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THE 
SUSQUEHANNA 



Apr. 1940 

to 
Apr. 1941 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Diamond Team Plays Bucknell 

This afternoon at three o'clock, the 
Crusader diamond team meets the 
Bucknell Bisons on the home diamond j Volume XXXXVII. 
for their second encounter of the sea- —————— ^— 

son. "Lefty" Krouse will pitch for Sus- 
quehanna. 



Inlerfraternity Ping Pong 

Tomorrow evening Beta Kappa will 
play host to Bond and Key's ping pong 
team; this will be the second match in 
the interfraternity championship play- 
off. 

T. K. A. to Attend Convention 

A delegation including Professor R. 
W. Gilbert and student members of 
Tau Kappa Alpha will attend the T. K. 
A. district convention at Bucknell Fri- 
day and Saturday. Robert Booth and 
Kenneth Wilt will enter the debate 
contest for Susquehanna; Merle Hoover 
will enter the extemporaneous speech 
contest. 

Motet to Broadcast 

Susquehanna's Motet Choir will give 
a half-hour concert over WCAU in 
Philadelphia from 1 to 1:30 P. M. This 
broadcast is a traditional part of the 
anual Motet tour. 

Tennis Team in Action 

Coach Stagg's court hopefuls open 
their thirteen-match season Saturday 
when they face the Dickinson Indians 
at Carlisle. 

Scranton-Keystone Nine Here 

Bob Pritchard and his baseball team 
will be hosts to Scranton-Keystone 
Junior College team here next Tues- 
day, April 23, at 2 P. M. 

Track Team to Meet Bucknell 

Susquehanna's track team will begin 
its season next Wednesday afternoon at 
3 P. M. when it vies with Bucknell. 
Both groups claim to have added 
strength this season. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1940 



Number 1 



Frederick C. Stevens Directs His Forty-three Voice Choir 




Band and Soloists 
Give Spring Concert 



FAMED MOTET CHOIR LEAVES FOR 
INTENSIVE ANNUAL CONCERT TOUR 



The Susquehanna University Concert 
Band rendered a very fine concert un- 
der the direction of Mr. Elrose Allison 
this last Thursday evening in Seibert 

I Chapel. The varied repertoire and the 
skill in the performers of the difficult 

• selections were highly commendable as 
proof of the progress of our student 
musicians. 

Especially worthy of praise are the 
Trioleers. Kenneth Bonsall. Neil Pish- 
er, and William Rother.borg. and the 
clarinet soloist. Edmund Koslowski, 
Each of the players displayed remark- 
able poise and talent, which may be 
said of the entire group. 

Mr. Allison is to be thanked for his 
untiring efforts to bring the accomp- 
lishments of the band to a higher level, 
one in which may be found a wide and 
well chosen program executed with a 
finesse and a vivid interpretation. 
S 



Susquehanna Sends Bucknell Plays Host 
Delegates to I. N. A. To T.K. A. Convention 



Stevens Introduces Special Arrangements of 
"Praise" and "Moonlight Sonata" Into Motet 
Repertoire 



Thatcher Elected as 
Susquehanna Editor 



Harry Thatcher, formerly managing 



elected editor-in-chief of that paper at 
a meeting of the electoral committee I 
of the Susquehanna Publishing Asso- 
ciation last Wednesday. Others who 
were elected to positions on THE SUS- 
QUEHANNA include: managing editor, 
Forrest Heckert; business manager, 
Elizabeth Reese; circulation manager, | 
Maxine Heefner. and advertising man- | 
ager, Paul Shoemaker. 

Freshmen who will be on the editor- i 
ial staff include: Ella Fetherolf, Mary 
COS, Dorothy Williamson. Pierce Cor- \ 
yell, Donald Bashore, Harry Wilcox, 
and Charles Gundrum. Members of j 
the business staff from the freshman 
class are: Rex Sunday, Frank Morgan, 
and Dorothy Weber. 

S 

Practice Teachers Are 
Forensic Contest Judges 



Dr. Krumbholz Tells 
Of "Social Service" 



Dr. C. E. Krumbholz, director of Na- 
tional Lutheran Welfare for the Na- 
tional Lutheran Council, spoke Mon- 
day morning in chapel on the subject, 
'Social Service." 

The speaker, father of Mary Lee 
Krumbholz, was introduced by Presi- 

ULut vi tVlUi i 13 Oii.Ull, .,.'.! Wi -iii He 

and Mrs. Krumbholz have been visit- 
ing. 

There are opportunities for youth in 
social service more than in most fields 
of endeavor because it is a field of work 
that is new and not overcrowded. In- 
deed, youth perhaps unknowingly is 
the largest factor in this field for he 
must face the changes that life brings 
and upon his decisions rests the char- 



<S> 



Newspaper Convention at Moravian 
Women's College Includes Lecture by 
William Lyon Phelps and Tour of 
Famous Buildings 



The Motet Choir left the campus last 

Sunday for its annual tour of concerts 

j in various churches and high schools. 

; The choir, under the direction of Pro- 

| fessor Frederick C. Stevens, and the 

management of Dr. Paul J. Ovrebo, has 

a schedule of two concerts a day, one 

i in the morning, and one in the even- 

I ing, spending the night at the place of 

! the evening concert. 

This year the choir has deviated 
from its usual type of program consist- 
ing entirely of motets, and has intro- 
duced into its pro b ium two very beau- 
i tiful numbers with p ccompaniment. 
! The first of these, "Praise," is an or- 
gan number, with Betty Barnhart at 
| the organ. The opening number of the 
| second group of selections on the pro- 
I gram, it is a forceful and exhilirating 
j number. The second of these accom- 
paniment numbers is a special arrange- 
j ment of Beethoven's first movement of 
the "Moonlight Sonata." There are no 



Forensic Fraternity to Hold District 
Convention Friday and Saturday; 
Debate and After-Pinner Speech to 
Be Featured 



acter of the future. Everywhere there words sung, but instead a violin obbli- 
are social problems, but regarded from ! gato is played by David Coren, and the 



Eight Susquehanna students who had 
done practice teaching in the field of 
English were judges at a Snyder County 
Forensic contest at Selinsgrove's Broad 
street high school on Saturday, April 
6. The contests were in grade school 
declamation and poetry. The judges 
included; Anne Hill, Dorothy Shutt. 
Virginia Burns, Helen Musselman, Vir- 
ginia Mann, Grace Fries, Donald Bill- 
man, and Hubert Pellman. 

The contestants numbered about ten 
to each grade. They were judged on 
the basis of memory, posture, enunci- 
ation, voice, and interpetation. 

S 



a different viewpoint these problems ! 
are opportunities for testing the lead- I 
ership of youth. 

Modern social welfare leaders recog- i 
nize the need for getting away from 
sentiment and the definite place that 
scientific methods and a professional 
attitude play in the work. There must 
be a genuine desire to be of service 
rather than a sentimental yen to help. 

Social work demands special train- 
ing and preparation both in college and 
graduate school. The agencies through 
which social service is rendered are: 
public agencies, private secular, and 
religious organizations. 



piano part is played by Elsie Hochella, 
while the choir itself gives a humming 
background, blending Deautifully into 
a melodic composition. 

Other numbers that the choir sings, 
are divided into three primary groups, 
that music belonging to the old classi- 
cal era, those of a lighter vein, and 
lastly those pertaining to church mu- 
sic. The first group consists of two 
numbers sung in Latin. "Lamenta- 
tions on Good Friday," a motet for six 
voices, written by Palestrina in the 
fifteenth century, and "Ave Regina 
Caelorum." written by Eduardo Jones, 
i Continued on Page 4t 



On Friday and Saturday, April 12 and 
13, the Intercollegiate Newspaper As- 
sociation of the Middle Atlantic States 
convened at the Moravian College for 
Women at Bethlehem to hold its semi- 
annual convention. There were more 
than one hundred delegates represent- 
ing colleges from the youngest in this 
country to the oldest girls' Protestant 
boarding school and college. Harry 
Thatcher and Forrest Heckert repre- 
sented "The Susquehanna' at this con- 
ference. 

Friday, at 2:30 p. m., following regis- 
uauuii, uicit- was a fceucitu ouoiiiess 

1 meeting which was succeeded by spe- 
cial sessions for discussion of the var- 
ious fields of college newspaper work: 

i the editorial page, news, sports, and 
business. The dinner in the evening 
was at the Beethoven Maenr.erchor. 
Dr. Heath, president of Moravian Col- 
lege for Women, was the speaker fol- 
lowing dinner 

At eight o'clock. Dr. William Lyon 
Phelps lectured at the high school. Dr. 

I Phelps, professor emeritus at Yale Uni- 

! versity, spoke very interestingly and 
wittily on many things — everything 
from a particular poem by Emily Bronte 
which is a good cure for despondency, 
to snoods and why the derby went out 
when the automobile came in. He built 
his lecture around what he expects to 
find in a good newspaper. 

In speaking of the sports page, Dr. 
Phelps stated that one can get great 
pleasure from sports, and, at the same 
time, get equal pleasure from philo- 
sophy and its allied studies. He said 
that "the rarest person in the whole 
world is an absolute pessimist;" that 
(Continued on Page 3> 



<s>- 



#— 



Susquehanna Possesses Excellent Athletic System; 
Everybody Eligible for Varsity, Intramural Teams 



Crompton Is Elected 
President of S. P. A. 



At a student poll, held in chapel last 
Friday morning, the officers for the 
Susquehanna Publishing Association 
for the coming year were elected. Mar- 
ion Crompton received the highest vote 
for president; Robert Booth and Merle 
Hoover were elected to fill the offices 
of vice-presideir and secretary re- 
spectively. 

The Susquehanna Publishing Asso- 
ciation member;; elect the staff officers 
for THE SUSQUEHANNA and serve 
as a nominating committee for the 
election of new officers. The newly- 
elects are required to be members of 
the junior ola 

The retiring officers are: President, 

Virginia Mann; vice-president. ; 

and secret a rv, 



Any bright spring afternoon after 
three Susquehanna turns over. The 
mental giants invest themselves in gym 
clothes and procede to develop them- 
selves a muscle. For example, down on 
the playing fields Red Mitman and by 
George Walsh will be playing a doubles 
match with Eugene Williams and 
Schuckie, while next court Ralph Wolf- 
gang and Gunner Robert Booth do a 
singles. 

Jim Hall will be putting the shot in 
secret behind the grandstand. High- 
jumper Fred Warner will be telling 
"Zip" Zavarich and Bill Curry, the 
quarter miler, how officials at the A. 
A. U. meeting in Philadelphia made 
him put the crossbar on right after he'd 
r < V OTted it like lie always did. 

Earl Deardorf will be prancing 
around the track for the 220 and 100 
yard dashes. Phil Templin will be 
showing promise at the half mile or 
880. "Chet" Shusta will be running the 
quarter, Harry Thatcher will be cover- 
ing the two mile with Bill Troutman. 
Blair Heaton will be highjumping or 
shotputting or discus throwing or run- 
ning the 100 or 220 yards races or— but 
that will be enough out of him. 

Baseballers Zubak and Isaacs and 
Shipe will be slowly pacing from the 



■>ym in a neck and neck contest with 
the daily train to see who will reach 
the other end of the field first, where 
Catcher Henry Klinger will be deep in 
consultation with Coach Bob Pritch- 
ard. 

Coach Stagg will oe keeping every- 
thing under surveillance, with a fond 
eye on the tennis and track teams es- 
pecially. 

And Dr. Ahl will be out looking over 
the prospects. 

There will be a lot more to look over, 
for more than 95 per cent of the males. 
and all but two per cent of the females 
at Susquehanna are participants in the 
college's Physical Education Program 
This is an excellent record for any 
■ChOOl, and for Susquehanna, it's a 
thing to be proud of. 

The Susquehanna Physical Educa- 
tion Program, then, should bear look- 
ing into. 

There are, at the University, 325 stu- 
dents. Of these 190 are men, and 135 
are women. Miss Irene Sluire. Women's 
Director of Ph.wca: Education, reports 
that in the the spcrts open to women, 
participants were as follows: 

Hockey. 103; soccer. 97; basketball. 
91; volley ball. 90; softball. 84. 

Of the 120 girls in the program, G6 



participated or 55 per cent. Of the 54 
girls not participating, 11 were not per- 
mitted by the family physician, 19 
others were upperclassmen in the Con- 
servatory of Music and 3 wer commut- 
ers, for whom additional expense and 
considerable inconvenience would have 
been involved, and 1 worked regularly. 
This left 20 girls not participating, or 
less than two per can , 

According to Miss Share. "This would 
indicate that less than two per cent 
are not interested, or, in the case <>! 
upperclassmen. cannot participate be- 
cause the maximum number for their 
Class are already playing in the various 
sports." 

On the male side of the sports pro- 
gram. Coach Stagg reports that of the 
190 men students, 57 were major lel- 
termen, and flve-eighthi or 7ti mei 
awards, not counting the soccei pi.' 
Male sporting participants included: 

Football players, varsity. 38; inter- 
class football, 35; soccer, 10; varsity 
basketball. 28; interclass basketball, 42; 
inteiirat basketball. 34; tennis, 12; 

track, 41; last year's intramurali 
playground ball. 33; Interclass ball, 40; 

ban ball, 30; volley ball. 34 
This year there will be a tournament 
i Continued on Page 4 i 



The annual district convention of 
Tau Kappa Alpha will be held on the 
campus of Bucknell University on Fri- 
day and Saturday of April 19th and 
20th. 

T. K. A. is a national forensic fra- 
ternity membership of which requires 
participation in such activities which 
involve debating and public speaking. 
Chapters are located in ninety-two col- 
leges strung from New Hampshire to 
California. The honorary fraternity 
was founded May 13, 1908 by Oswald 
Ryan. Its purpose is to sponsor ac- 
tivities and develop interests in speech 
work. Public speaking has reached a 
point of extreme importance in our 
daily living. Every profession and vo- 
cation require that one be capable of 
handling the English language with 
' ease and effectiveness. 

In the Pennsylvania district, such 
colleges as Dickinson. Franklin and 
Marshall. Gettysburg, Drew University. 
Juniata. Muhlenberg, Rutgers, Beth- 
any, Hobart, Keuka, Lafayette. New 
Brunswick, Upsala, Ursinus. Waynes- 
burg. Western Maryland. Westminster. 
and Susquehanna will be represented 
at the conclave at Bucknell. 

One of the outstanding features of 
■ this convention is the debate contest. 
Each college is represented both on the 
affirmative and negative side of the 
; question by one speaker only. Speeches 
j must be brief but well organized in 
! content. Cross examinations must also 
1 be clear and to the point. 

The T. K. A. banquet will be held 

on Friday evening which is followed by 

the contest of after dinner speeches. 

I Final round in debate contest will be 

i concluded Saturday morning and a 

' business session ami election of officers 

Saturday afternoon. 

A delegation from Susquehanna U 
; expected to accompany Professor Rus- 
sell Gilbert to the session. S. U. will 
| also have entrants into the conti 
S 



Flute Students Give 
Recital at Phi Mu Delta 

The flute pupils of Lorna Wren gave 
a recital, Friday evening at the Phi 
Mu Delta fraternity hou-e 

The fraternity parlor was very al- 
and targS bouquets of cut flowers. Mi 
tract ively decorated with large palms 
Wren made ■ charming mistress of 
ceremonies A special feature of the 
evening was the introduction Oi 
piCCOloiStS of live and seven ] ears of 
age. These two tots played "Sw< 
Low." and "Blue Bells of Seotlarj 

The program lasted for about I 

minutes and varied in style, compo 
and arrangements. Members of the 
college conservatory taking part in the 

program were Janet Shoekey F.Kie Ho- 
chella. pianists. James Myer and Jo- 
seph Pasterchick. 
This was the I 
Wren's class. Miss Wrei 
the country as a concer 
been ■ scholarship student at the Jul- 
liard School of Music, and a former 
pupil oi Qeorge Barren At pre 
Miss Wren is studying with Knuaid o: 
the Philadelphia Symphony O 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1940 

THE SUSOUEHANNA r Spring-Minded Swings ten' Sway PREVIEWS — 

^C " t-fi ~i jr J J • f-t-i J i T~x Wednesday and Thursday, 

Published Weekly Throughout the _ College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- J- O iVl tf lUU lUlld 1 VC IllZb U UU PJ^ JJJ^ ^ YOUNG TOM 

mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated EDISON takes place in Port Huron, 

intervals, as required b y the Post Office Department. Another week-end over and every- brother and friend; Deacon Critch- Michigan, the birthplace of the great 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner. '42, Circulation Manager. one j s feeling very elated about the field was really "in the groove" and inventor, and shows him as a clever 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. Saturday night Interfraternity Dance tired the girls out before the evening lad, interested in science and display- 

„ - — — - — — — :■ .. „ ,,,,,,,,„ » + i Qr ,ti7 _ ^;; e 7 held at the gvm. Bruce Hall furnished was half over. Fisher should be tired ing signs of the inventive genius that 

Member Intercalate Newspaper .Action o^ theMgdte Atlantic States. MJN £ g J^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ jf ^ 

__ Member of Nation al Col lege Press Association. Eve ryone looked as though spring Some of the newer couples got along one were getting the impression that 

THE STAFF has really come at last. Of course— we well— Corney and Blair, Hendricks and Mickey Rooney's dramatic abilities 

OR TN rmFP HARRY B THATCHER mean as far as clothes are concerned! Bonsall (the Romeo), Arentz and Bax- were confined to formula portrayals of 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE Another sign of spring— the return ter. Walsh and Weber. Come, come, Judge Hardy's son, YOUNG TOM EDI- 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert of alumni. It's good to see familiar now, Frattali, who is she? That goes SON should send them scampering 

Reporters: Margaret Grenobie. '40; Anne Hill, '40; Virginia Mann, '40; G. Rob- people on the dance floor, such as Bas- for you, too, McCord. back to their cynical holes. For a more 
ert Booth, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle Hoover. '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; tresSi Reese, Wert, Yingling, Worth- The older couples were Ken and Loie, moving, really superb piece of acting 
Eleanor Smith. '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; Blair Heaton, '42; ington Cr0 f t anc j Ochenrider. We Fenner and Helm, Heefner and Bill- has not been done in many a moon, 
Ruth Schwenk. '42; Willard Sterrett. '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor- dont know for sure but something tells man, Haves and Pritch, Snookie and even by more accomplished adult ac- 
yell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; Ella Fetherolf, '43; Charles Gundrum, '43; Dan us the chaperons Dean Gait, Dr. Houtz Bice, Mendy and Stoney, Tina and tors of the screen. The supporting 
MacCartney. '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson. 43. &nd professor Gilbert were talking Gehron, Anne and Homer. It seems cast includes Fay Bainter, George Ban- 
Circulation Manager pTui shoemaker about fishing. Wonder if there'll be so nice to see those old faithfuls still croft, Virginia Weidler, Eugene Pall- 

BuL e ness m Assis"anL er Delph'ine Hoover ,' Robert MacQuesten,' Stanley Stonesifer. classes Monday? attending the formals together ette, Victor Killian, and Bobby Jordan. 

' Rex Sunday Frank Morgan, and Dorothv Weber. We noticed that Mr. Donley com- We hope all enjoyed themselves as ... 

Faculty Advisors- Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business. Prof. D. I. Reitz. muted again this week-end to be with much as Welsh, Kaltreider, McWil- Friday, April 19 

. ! Peg; Albert was paying a great deal of Hams, Sechler, Harder, and Baye did, VIGIL IN THE NIGHT is the story 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1940 ^^ attention to Spechtie; Naylor and and so until the next dance we'll say of an English nurse (Carole Lombard), 

nvTrniTmHii" pnurv "Shaf" were acc ompanied)?) by Shaf's good-bye for now. her faith in her profession, and her de- 

OIS EiDIlUKl/VL rULltr sire to see her younger sister (Ann 

Each year many questions are asked by student, faculty, *</^~ > /^\TA.T/^TT~ > \T7T\.T/'~ > T7 " Shirley) become a successful nurse, too. 

and administration regarding the editorial policy of THE SUS- V^VjllN V^JLUlUN V^H S 1 !!^ *! also 1 notable . for f tne ., fact 

„ ,, ., ii i. i ^«.i j t™„ . _^__ tri£it trie Ic&turc piftycrs 3,1c tintcimiii3,r, 

QUEHANNA. We feel, therefore, that some attempt should be ============= wWch becomes an asget It hag been 

made to Clarify the policy followed in the publication of this This week I shall remark on many of Really Louie it maybe all right to go directed with extra good tastei good 

™,«« a r**r Tt <* ^npripllv timplv that such a statement Of tne coincidental happenings on our to the junior high school operetta but and m gend th women t 

newspapei. It is especially timely mat sucn a statement, 01 campus It was just a coincidence that is it necessary to buy the whole front £ ryir ; g Qne of the better pictur e S f 

policy Should appear in the first issue produced by a new Staff. Billy Nye happened by; or was it? He row just to see the one actress. the curren t cinema season, RKO- 

THE SUSOUEHANNA is the newspaper Of Susquehanna claims that he is going to tell Peg what It is indeed a remarkable coinci- Radio . g prodU ction also star's Brian 

Z . , , « . , „ _ » • it means. I wonder. dence that Knapper is asked to lecture Ay . prr . p „ nH nm-ic: t lnvH 

University. It tries to bring before its readers all news of in- ll ™ s a eems tnat it was only a coinci . t0 the s c A y \ wonder what the Aherne and Do » sL1 °> d - 

terest about Student, faculty, administration, and alumni — SO denc e that John Macarthy Lawrence subject is going to be. Monday, April 22 

lone: as the publication Of this news will not detract from a happened to intercept a letter written prof. Reitz should be more careful THE ^ AN WHQ WOULDNT TALK 

c™™th ,,, 1Tin L nnrrmin! snirit Tt will so far as DOSSible S'ive to his lost flame. I guess that accounts in his squeezing illustrations in class ig dramatic thnller starring Lloyd 

smooth-iunning campus spirit, it win, so iai as possjoie, give for the facfc that there were tears in hereafter Nolan Jean Rogers and Richard 

precedence to those articles Which are Of Widest interest to the n is e yes. Where there's smoke, there's With the Phi Mu boys eating at the clark g This fascinating melodrama 

readers fire - d0rm * WaS n0t sur P rising t0 see x one . gives a stark picture of the fear which 

We all were amazed and surprised of the girls post a sign by the front k t man ' s nDS sea led from telline 

Editorially, THE SUSQUEHANNA Will diSCUSS issues Of when Jimmie Millford brought his d00r , « All deliveries will please be made ^ e h P a \ ^e knew about the crime. 

Campus national. Or international SCOpe, but always from the bestest to the prom from Hazleton, but at the rear." Is it just a coincidence _ _ _ 

■ I t ■ ~r *v,„ i«jf4<H<hia1 cHirlont Attpmntc will hp mnrlp what surprises us now is that after that Hutch has a sore thumb or did Tuesdav Anr ji 03 

point of view of the individual student. At empts will be made ^.^ £■ ^ ghe now writes to ^ hammer glip Tuesday, ^ ^^ ^^ 

to recognize and point OUt the good as well as tne Daa in tne Bull but Jirnm i e hasn't received a let- Zip per has just asked Sanders to is the story of a night club dancer 
issues at hand. The goal Of the editorial section Will be to stimu- ter for the longest time. Coincidence? j 0in h is club. May I suggest that it is (Ann sothern) who tires of this life 

lntp student thought in the problems of the day in a construe- Lewis and * have been wo , nde I ing a very g00d club and that a11 people and stows awa >' on a shi P bound for 
late Stuaent tnougnt in tne piuuiems. vi hk u*y a ^ ^ hQw lQng w , g gQ . ng tQ t&ke Sam ^^ _^ ^ ^ &t ^ ^ f ^^ ^ ^^ plantations. On the way 

tive manner. to get enough courage to put the ques- know but may be he could tell you. across the ship becomes lost in a storm 

An attempt will be made to tell more Of the news Of the tion t0 a certain commercial teacher in They tell me that Lewis is still hold- and she is forced to spend some time 

11. v, -^^v.™ -ixn+v, +v,;o (m ™l<n* o ctoff nVintno- Norrv? ing out for more money. among the savage Congo tribes. John 

campus through pictures. With this in mind, a staff photog- Lois told me t0 call Ken Bird . brain . ^ u coincidence or is it a fact Carre J is the young doctor on board 

rapher Will be chosen to head this WOrk. Ken told me to call Lois Bird-brain. It that B1U pritchard was beating off the ship who falls in love with Ann Soth- 

Finally, we should say that THE SUSQUEHANNA is writ- ™u>7^e ^"uX' ™ els °" "*?** tt _ ^ s 

ten entirely by students. Any student who is interested in jour- ln each other. stlber a " d , hls bI ?, t,ro ' her ; Bl ">:' ¥ . _ " _ 

na"i He writing of any kind" is invited to join THE SUSQUE- «. •* ^SJSZZZ Z m ~££ZS%£i«''<££ J«n 10r ^"to Feature 

HANNA staff. Any opinion which the student wishes to express f^r™ They S?,fraid some "lor cidence? 1 B uess s„ hut 1 «onder ? Unique Lighting System 

through the medium of the college newspaper will be received, high school giri's mother will come up Yours truly, The evening of May 1L 1940i will be 

Anv pritlpi<;m lpariinP' to the betterment Of the oaoer will be arid mistake them for Baylor and tell P. S. Peg. I suggest you find out u d t f th next dance on Susque . 
Any Cllticism leading to the betteiment OI tne pape l WUl De her daughter what Coincidence means. hanna University's campus. Through- 
most welcome, whether coming from faculty, administration, 01 ==== _ ==:==:=== ======^ out the pagt fe ^ w « tne varioug 

student. We invite especially the open criticism of the retiring l\/[r]I?101I? CIlf^ll^TlRlRT TTWf^ 1 ^8 committees in charge of the affair have 

staff hoping thereby to benefit from those more experienced i^LILJUL ^^JTlJLJOJDlJL'JLl ^ lJuF been completing final arrangements. 

. ■ ~ Tickets for the event are on sale at 

than ourselves. ««-*_ ^u^,, nan v.nm the present time, the price is the tra- 

S The flame of genlus burns momen " Mlsty ethei c a n i hum ditional nrom charge of three dollars 

tarilv and then for a time dies out; but A dreamy melody. «» ° nal P rom cnarge 01 tnree dollars. 

nmvnnnvniTTl »«*y ■«* «**■» « " • Tickets may be secured from Harry 

EVER\BOD\ OUT. ever and anon the spirit moves, and Thatcher, Karl Young. Elaine Miller, 

Ninety five per cent of the men and ninety eight per cent something of a creative nature evolves wise old man Neptune Dougiag portzUne or Donald pord 

of the women of Susquehanna participate each year in one or ^o^ Jf^^^gy^J^ s a s J Jea i ous became Mr. Moon; The music for the event win be fur- 

more sports— inter-mural or inter-collegiate. This percentage quehanna fi nd the path to their col- But both are very nice. St^Si^SS ot * ^^^S 

is SO high compared With that Of Other institutions Of this na- umn, and perhaps, eventually, to fame. each fifteen men. The band has traveled 

ture that we feel that the athletic system at Susquehanna su ™ e e S d ^X tak!son W a new "dress wooed me and lost. extensively throughout the eastern sea- 

should be given a little consideration and a lot Of praise. " t ' ne ro / bv What sh0 ws this I'd much rather reach board and works out of State College, 

° , ., .. , . , B f " *!». ... ti „ ,., rrv,„ u OQrt nf lark Frn^ Pennsylvania, where its agency is lo- 

What are the primary purposes of a program of athletics in more clearly than that attractive sign The heart of Jack Frost. ^^ The outm consigtg B of fl y ve reed 

the small liberal arts college? Cannot they be summarized ^*!=f /^J*S»5 5££*tmm -He's not up in the clouds, musicians, six members in the brass 

something like this: (1) to develop in every Student a fair de- £ $8 £ 7r g A dash g of S p rin g, a starry Nor in the Milky Way; SSr^SSiS^n^^SmSS 

gree Of love for and playing ability in One or more sports Which sky, a warm breeze; add a sprinkling ^ te ^ la ^ r a 1 y v ^ hr0UdS 3J ^ J the rhythm miit 

can furnish recreation both during and after college days, (2) j^*^ ^ZT'' "" Aiack-a-day. ^ ^ ^ -^ piang ^ under 

to allow those With special talents to develop them adequately, ' The following exerpt is not original way for the securing of professional 

(3) to give the "average student" the ability and desire to speak not a satelute for me ^™ *« • MM- $™ - %£?£££, SSTSLSSl 

intelligently about the major sports in which the people Of the "Shooting stars from heaven, expreS s something which we all would chairman of the decorating committee, 

world play and finally, to do all these things in SUCh a manner Messages for whom? find fltab i e t0 bear in mind. states that the Alumni Gymnasium 

wujiu piaj , «"v. j, o one's a date at seven will be planned in a color scheme and 

as not to interfere with the academic pursuits of the student. » ^ ^ ^ ^ moon ^ yQu r&mble on thru m Brotner( lightin g arrangement which win rival 

At this time, with the beginning Of a new Season of the Whatever be your goal a11 decorating placed in the gym by 

orcvious cIrssgs 

sports year, we may well review the athletic program for the "Orion blinked welcome, Kee p your eye upon the Doughnut ' The programs for the social event of 

ensuing months This spring, Susquehanna men and women Frolic ga y with me; And n ot up on the Hol e." the vear have alreadv been order ed 

will participate in individual, inter-fraternity, interclass, and F i na l Touches Added to Baltimore-Washington ^^^^^^^ 

inter-collegiate games; there is no student enrolled in Susque- y ar j e f v C}, ow Plans Alumni Plan Banquet the event to those who secure tickets, 

hanna who is not eligible to participate in some form of ath- * plan to be present at the Junior 

,1.- Prom sponsored hy the class of '41. 

jeilcSi The Campus Variety Show, which is Arrangements are being completed rx>N'T MISS THE DANCE OF THE 

The men this spring Will be competing against each Other to be presented by the combined S. A. for one of the largest gatherings of YEAR!! 

individually in the tennis play-off and in golf; in Softball and I ■«> the Men's Music Guild, is rap- Susquehanna University alumni in the g 

iiwiwuuouj iu 1- ^ j b 1 idl roundi ng into fine shape. The Baltimore-Washington district at the it CnnAnMnA Kv 

ping pong they will compete as fraternities; in track they will so i oistSt along wlth those who are tak- Brooke Tea House on 7710 Blair Road, Vespers t Onauctea Dy 

be aligned by classes; in baseball, track, and tennis they will ing part in duets, trios, quartets, and n. w., Washington, d. c, on wednes- Mary Lee Kmmbholtz 

mpnt ..nmnet'itnrs from other colleges other ensemble numbers, are diligently day, April 17th. H. Vernon Blough, 

meet competitor irom ouiei cwwipw. . . , putting on the final touches to their general secretary of the Alumni Asso- The Sund evening vesper serylce 

The women have completed recently a series Of inter-Class particular numbers, and the one-act ciation, and Edwin M. Brungart, a re- was in char g e ^ th e Biemic Society 

tournaments such as basketball and baseball; they, too, Will play. "The New Bride" promises to be tired member of the faculty, will rep- and was conducte d by Mary Lee 

have an individual tennis tournament. In addition, the girls are oneof the best comedies seen here in recent me campus a^seii nsgrove e mo olz ser 

. . ., it.wi- u;i,;«r,- fo^iHtioc. a lon S "me. tion pictures 01 Lampus hhtiuh wm b s i n g ing a hymn and following that 

encouraged to use the available biking facilities. The program , g a varied one wlth be shown . Ellen B Be ^ nage y condU cted the devo- 

Add to this the all-inclUSive program Of physical education. man y surprises in store. In addition to R ev . I. Wilson Kepner of 224 Wash- tions. Joe Pasterchick played a flute 

Compulsory for both men and women and VOU have a system Of some excellent numbers of a serious burn street, Baltimore, Md., is the solo with Alice Deitrick as accompan- 

,, *u, +• n, n u ht i« tv,ie fkee cmhnnl nature there will be several comic nov- president of the club. Other officers of 1st. 

college athletics among tne nest in mis. Ciaisb btnooi. gM(|| and solos in the popular vein . A the local Susqueh anna alumni asso- The topic of the service was "Faith 

If a program Of athletics SUCh as this is to continue, it must chorus of about thirty will augment the ciation are vice-president. Rev. Samuel in God." Faith in God was defined as 

remain a popular feature of college life. Participation in ath- H^mlty numbers. H . Kornmann. 1516 Hamlin Street. N. trusting dependence and belief in ever- 

i=fi»c hnwi oiooiiimoto nnrl iv^^nrtnnt nlon* in fl nv wpll ronnri- The show will be presented Thurs- E„ Washington, D. C; secretary, Rev. lasting desire for our happiness. Faith 

letics holds a legitimate and impoitant plate in any well lound ^ a ^ ^ Seibert HaU R Luther Rhoades 5311 0wvnn 0ak t0 us means that we believe in God's 

ed college curriculum. The long-awaited spring has arrived, SO chapel at 8:15 Ave.. Baltimore, Md.; and Samuel F. care and through faith in Him we shall 

ii turn out and avail ourselves Of the fine facilities for s Allison, 2423 East Street, N. W., Wash- have perfect peace. Reverend Krumb- 

S p ( , Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. ington, D. C. holz pronounced the benediction. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<£>- 



-<S>- 



-«►- 



PRITCHARDITES TROUNCE HAVERFORD 
10-1 IN FIRST DIAMOND CONTEST 

Krouse Opens Season on Mound in Brilliant 
Style; Schleig and Zavarich Capture Batting 
Honors; Ford and Klinger Display Skill 



Track and Field Men 
Prepare for Bucknell 



Navy Representative 
Shows Film at Phi Mu 



The Crusaders under the tutelage of 
Coach Bob Pritchard got off to a run- 
ning start Wednesday afternoon as 
they soundly trounced Haverford Col- 
lege 10-1. 

The visitors got off to a one run lead 
in the opening inning on a hit by 
Warner, a sacrifice, an error and a 
single by Williams. 

In the second inning, however, the 
Crusaders opened up and after two 
men reached first on errors, three 
singles drove in two runs before the 
side was retired on a double play. 

In the fourth and fifth innings the 
Crusaders opened up in earnest and 
disposed of Howe on a double by Zava- 
rich after Schleig had tripled to the 
centerfield hedge. In the fifth Isaacs 
singled, went to second on an over- 
throw and scored when Ford doubled 
to right centerfield. Kaltreider then 
singled but Ford was caught at the 
plate. 

"Lefty" Krouse who tossed them 
from the portside for the locals, was 
touched for seven hits but they were 
kept well scattered. Krouse showed 
very good control in his first assign- 
ment of the season by walking only two 
men while he fanned five. 

Don Ford pulled the unexpected in 
the fifth inning. Beeler doubled to 
right field and after the throw in, Ford 
produced the ball from places unknown 
and promptly stopped a possible Hav- 
erford rally. 

Batting honors for the day went to 
John Schleig and "Zip" Zavarich, while 
all the Crusaders except Steve Zera- 
vica cashed in with at least one solid 
bungle. Schleig will be absent from 
the lineup for several days, having suf- 
fered from a torn ligament in his right 
foot, while he was sliding into second 
base. The lineup: 
Susquehanna AB R H O A 

Isaacs, 3b 5 1 2 6 

Ford, 2b 5 2 3 1 

Zeravica. lb 5 8 

Kaltreider, ss 3 2 1 5 

Klinger, c 4 1 1 6 2 

Schleig, rf 4 2 3 

Zavarich, If 3 3 2 3 

Zuback, cf 4 1 2 1 

Krouse, p 3 2 



PHI MU TAKES FIRST GAME IN 
INTERFRATERNITY PING PONG 



The "Men of the Wooden Paddles" 
I from Phi Mu defeated Beta Kappa on 
1 their home table on Tuesday evening. 
| Phi Mu took four sets while the Beta 
i Kappa boys were copping one. Play was 
! fast and furious and both adversaries 
j showed plenty of spirit. 

The sets were played on the basis of 

| the best two out of three games. In the 

opener Johnny Jones defeated Jack 

Shipe 21-14. 21-9. Then Bob Critchfield 

took Merle Hoover into camp 21-16, 

14-21, 21-16. Jimmy McCord beat Ken- 

', ny Wilt 21-12, 21-10 and Gene Smith 

took Herbie Klinger 21-14, 21-10. In the 

| final tilt Kenny Bonsall won over Nap- 

j per Knapp 21-13, 21-18. 

On Thursday, April 18 Bond and Key 
plays at Beta Kappa and on Tuesday, 
April 23, Phi Mu plays at Bond and 
Key. 



-S- 



Crusader Nine Meets 
Bisons Here Today 



Totals 30 10 

Haverford AB R 

Warner, ss 5 1 

Winslow, If 5 

Beeler, c 4 

Williams, rf 4 

Strohl, lb 4 

Saxer, 2b 1 

Howe, p 

Straus'h, p 1 

J. Magill, 3b 3 

Lewis, cf 3 

Dor'n, p, 2b 4 

x Dewald 1 



13 27 10 
H O A 

2 3 
2 
5 

2 
(i 



o 

1 

2 

3 

2 3 2 





Totals 35 1 7 24 11 

x Batted for Howe in 6th. 

Haverford 100000000—1 

Susquehanna ... 02044000 x— 10 

Errors — Susquehanna 5 (Isaacs, Ford, 
Zeravica, Kaltreider, Klinger); Haver- 
ford 4 (J. Magill 2, Beeler, Saxer). 

Two base hits — Beeler, Isaacs, Ford. 
Three base hits— Schleig, Zavarich. 
Bases on balls— Off Howe 1, Krouse 5. 
Winning pitcher — Krouse. Losing 
pitcher — Dorian. Stolen bases— Warn- 
er, Winslow, Schleig, Dorian. Double 
plays— Kaltreider, Klinger and Isaacs; 
J. Magill, Dorian and Strohl. Umpires 
— Beamenderfer and Spangler. 

S 

SUSQUEHANNA SENDS 
DELEGATES TO I. N. A. 

i Continued from Page 1) 
generally, so-called pessimists are mere- 
ly flattering themselves. One of the 
few genuine pessimists the world has 
ever seen was Jonathon Swift, who, 
among other things, would wear mourn- 
ing on his birthday anniversary. 

Concerning the legitimate stage, he 
said, "America has grown faster in the 
theatre than in any other art,"— but 
only in New York. In order to remedy 
this situation, he would like to see a 
resident company and repertory thea- 
tre in every town in the country to 
present the same plays as New York 
at the same time. 

Turning then to the motion picture, 
Dr. Phelps said that he used to wonder 
why the majority of movies were an 
"insult to the intelligence of a sub- 
normal adolescent." But, that since 
the Mars invasion scare of the fall of 



This afternoon Coach "Bob" Pritch- 
ard's diamond nine will enact the sec- 
ond scene of their fourteen act season 
when they vie with the varsity Bison 
swingsters from up the Susquehanna. 

If we can judge from last week's epi- 
sode the locals really have something 
to offer in the way of resistance to 
Coach Sitarsky's boys. This will be the 
first intercollegiate fray for our guests; 
while our men have the encourage- 
ment of a smashing victory under their 
belt, given them last Wednesday by a 
• struggling Haverford team. 

Coach Pritchard will probably use 
: the same batting order as that used 
'last Wednesday. It was: Isaacs, Ford, 
I Zeravica, Kaitrider, Klinger. Schleig, 
j Zavarich, Zuback, Krouse. 

"Lefty" Krouse will get the nod to 
\ the mound after a brilliant job of hurl- 
ing last week. The former Selinsgrove 
High School star proved quite per- 
plexing to the Haverford crew and will 
| probably do the same this week. In 
| Selinsgrove High "Lefty" hurled his 
: school to two championships, winning 
1 15 out of 17 games; he w y as also captain 
| during his senior year. 

Our advance dope on Bucknell indi- 
i cates that Ralph Livengood, veteran 
I right-hander now playing his third 
I season of varsity ball, will be the start- 
ing mound assignment here. Captain 
Jack Kessler will again be posted at 
first base; either George Kiick or Red 
Snyder will do the receiving. Joe Buzas, 
head batsman of last year's squad with 
a .414 average, will take up his position 
at short stop for this afternoon's game. 
"Jock" Doenges will play second base. 

An improved team, playing on a bet- 
ter home field than last season, and 
the confidence of victory should prove 
adequate to bring the Crusaders ven- 
gence over last season's defeat. 



1938, he knows that it must be because 
the people are so unintelligent. How- 
ever, he pointed out, there have been 
some really excellent photoplays re- 
cently, such as: "Wuthering Heights", 
"David Copperfield", "Goodby Mr. 
Chips", "Anna Karenina", and "Pyg- 
malion". To him, "Gone With the 
Wind" was a poor picture although he 
thought the book was fine. The picture 
was too monotonous, and Olivia de- 
Havilland was a much too healthy look- 
ing Melanie. 

In the period following the lecture 
which was devoted to asking Dr. Phelps 
questions, someone asked his opinion 
on the subject of a third term for 
Roosevelt. He replied that on the lec- 
ture platform he never discusses poli- 
tics or war "becauce culture must be 
kept alive." 

Saturday included a reopening of the 
Friday sessions at their individual op- 
tion; another general business meet- 
ing including election of new officers; 
lunch in the Moravian College dining 
room; a tour of the famous historical 
Moravian buildings; and a tea dance 
at Sigma Nu on the Lehigh University 
campus. At the banquet in the Foun- 



The most popular song on the cam- 
pus among the track fellows this week 
seems to be "With the Wind and the 
Rain in Their Hair." Last week found 
the boys out running around in all 
kinds of weather. The week started 
off beautifully but ended in a snow 
storm, and what a storm. This will 
make the season slow at the start be- 
cause it is the second such layoff of 
the year, both coming when most of 
the fellows were just rounding into 
good condition. As we open with our 
toughest opponents, and rivals, we re- 
gret this situation very much. For 
track interest has reached a peak this 
year and most of the fellows are out 
to make good against Bucknell. The 
whole team wants to balance some of 
the lopsided scores that have appeared 
in the past. Bucknell should be more 
vulnerable this year as their star run- 
ner and captain last year has gradu- 
ated, along with some of the other 
steady performers. 

For a brief preview of what the home 
team should do, we can say that the 
team has developed one hundred per 
cent over the times and distances of 
last year. Most of the boys have brok- 
en their records of last year just prac- 
ticing, and they can be expected to do 
better in the meet. The only drawback 
now is whether they can get back into 
condition after such a long lay-off. 

The interclass meet that was pre- 
viously scheduled for this week will be 
postponed till a later date. This was 
announced by Coach Stagg since the 
present condition has arisen. The team 
is going to concentrate on the meet 
against Bucknell since there are only 
nine days to practice before the meet. 



Last Thursday night, April 11, Lieu- 
| tenant Robert Allen, educational di- 
i rector of Pennsylvania for the United 
j States Navy, gave an illustrated lecture 
at Phi Mu Delta Fraternity. His p > 
pose is to travel to various colleges to 
show the opportunities offered by the 
Navy Air Corps of the United States 
Navy. 

He illustrated his lecture with two 
reels of film showing life at Pensacola 
Training Station. About forty men 
students of the school attended. 

S 

Tsk! Tsk! 

Clerk: "May I have next Monday 
off?" 
Boss: "Why. may I ask?" 
"It's my silver wedding day, sir." 
"What!" roared the boss. "Are we 
going to have to put up with this every 
25 years?" 



RadioStationW8TIW 
Lauded for Flood Aid 



Susquehanna's radio station, W8TIW 
was honored by a letter of thanks from 
Lieut.-Col. H. L. Robb of Baltimore, 
for services rendered during the past 
flood crisis. Lieut.-Col. Robb, the act- 
ing district army engineer, stressed the 
invaluable assistance rendered by ama- 
teurs in relaying vital information. 
Radio communications are the most 
efficient, the fastest and the most de- 
pendable of any thereby assuring or- 
derly and timely evacuation. River 
readings were radioed almost imme- 
diately to the Department of Waters 
in Harrisburg thereby permitting com- 
petent engineers to make "on the spot" 
crest predictions with amazing accur- 
acy, giving residents of the flooded 
area sufficient time to totally evacuate. 
Then too, these readings have been 
recorded in graph form in order to 
make any future predictions which 
might be necessary almost 100 f 7 ac- 
curate, eliminating chances quite 
largely of distasters such as those 
which occurred in some places in 1936. 
Cooperation with commercial radio 
stations by amateurs keeps the public 
informed as to any potential dangers 
from disaster, thus fulfilling a vital 
public service, which is after all the 
purpose of amateur radio. 

Dr. Paul J. Ovrebo, W8TIW, an- 
nounces that the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission has been petition- 
ed for Class A status, action to be 
taken in the very near future. W8TIW 
is operated by Dr. Ovrebo and Merle 
Hoover. W8TLH. 



tain Room of the Hotel Bethlehem, 
the I.N.A. cups were awarded to the 
representatives of those papers which 
had been judged best in their group, 
in advertising, in editorial work, in 
news, and in sports. Dr. Amos Ettinger, 
head of the history department of the 
Moravian College and Theological 
Seminary, spoke on the topic, "From 
the Reader's Chair." 

The Fair Sees Club of Moravian Col- 
lege for Women gave a formal dance at 
the hotel to which I.N.A. delegates were 
invited. 

S 

What It Cost Him 

The struggling author and his lovely 
young wife were at a party. A friend 
approached the writer and, with ad- 
miration in his voice, said: "Penwell, 
your wife is the most beautiful woman 
in the room. And her gown is positively 
a poem!" 

The writer nodded gloomily, and re- 
plied: "Not a poem, old man— 16 poems, 
seven short stories, and a novel." 
S 

From labor health, from health con- 
tentment springs.— Beattie. 



JIVELAND 

DANCING 

f:30 - - 11:00 

Meet Your Fellow Students 

MASONIC TEMPLE 



strand 

THEATRE 

sunbury 



WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
APRIL 17 AND 18 

Lew Ayers 
Lionel Barrymore 

"Dr. Kildare's 
Strange Case" 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
APRIL 19 AND 20 

Shirley Temple 

"BLUE BIRD" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
APRIL 22 AND 23 

Burgess Meredith 
Betty Field 

"Of Mice and Men" 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, ONLY 

Charles Laughton 
Vivien Leigh 

"Side Walks of 
London" 



a 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • • 

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 

Carole Lombard 
Brian Ahern 

Vigil in the Night" 

SATURDAY. APRIL 20 

Tom Brown 

"Oh, Johnny How 
You Can Love" 

MONDAY, APRIL 22 

Lloyd Nolan 
Jean Rogers 

"The Man Who 
Wouldn't Talk" 

TUESDAY, APRIL 23 

Ann Sothern 
John Carroll 

"Congo Maisie" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY' 
APRIL 24 AND 25 

Bing Crosby 

Dorothy Lamour 

Bob Hope 

"The Road to 
Singapore" 



Compliments of 

KLINE'S 

MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Farmers National 
Bank 

Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are interested in a Bigger 
SUSQUEHANNA 

and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 

Let us join hands In Making Thla 
Come True 



VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna. 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Type-writers 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The I faxatl Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St. 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



DIAMONDS WATCHES 

Have Your Watch Repaired Now. 

No Watch Too Small. All 

Work Guaranteed. 

W. M. VALSING 

Jewel i Selinsgrove, Pa. 



TYDOL VEEDOL 

RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an Individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK TEAT 
OVER! 



Watsontown Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 



AND 



PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa. Paxtonvllle, Pia 



PAGE FOl'R 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1940 



Noted Guest Artists 
For Band Festival 



Leona May Smith, Famed Cornetist, 
Will be Soloist; Dr. Frank Simons 
Will Conduct at Band Festival 



Students Invited to 



Bom Gregory Murray— "Music" 
Harold E. Darke— "O Brother Man" 

Motet for six voices # _ 

Charles Wood— "Glory and Honour and A If] in Vll h-rY0Sll LlSV 



Stage Staff Busy on Fed. of Women's Clubs 
Scenery for New Play JTo Hold Spring Meeting 



Laud" 



PART III. 
Christiansen- 



"Lost in the 



on 



Two hundred select and eager high 
school musicians and all of Susque- 
hanna's student body will have the 
pleasure of seeing Dr. Frank Simon 
conduct and hearing Miss Leona May- 
Smith. America's Premier Cornet Solo- 
ist, while they are on our campus May 
2, 3, and 4 for the Central Pennsylvania 
All-Master High School Band Festival. 

Dr. Frank Simon, who conducted the 
famous Armco Band and is Director of 
the Band Department at Cincinnati 
Conservatory of Music will conduct the j 
Festival Band In its concert Saturday 
evening. May 4. He will be assisted by 
Samuel W. Kurtz, music supervisor of 
the Bloomsburg public schools and 
Donald N. Luckenbill of West Hazle- 
ton and Freeland school districts. 

Miss Leona May Smith, celebrated 
cornet virtuoso, has appeared as solo- 
ist with the Goldman Band, Fred War- 
ing and his "Pennsylvanians," and at 
Radio City Music Hall. 

Miss Smith's music career began 
when she was attracted by a shiny 
cornet in the display window of a Bos- 
ton music shop. Her father bought the 
instrument for her and instructed her 
in the fundamentals of the art. At the 
age of nine she was making public ap- 
pearances and three years later she was 
engaged as first trumpet of the Boston 
Women's Symphony. 

In 1931 Miss Smith appeared as solo- 
ist with the band of her teacher, Wal- 
ter M. Smith. Dr. Edwin Franko Gold- 
man invited her to appear as soloist 
with his band in New York City. Later 
she played with Fred Waring. 

Critics have hailed Miss Smith as be- 
ing not only the greatest woman cor- 
netist but also as one of the greatest 
soloists of this generation. 



F. Melius 
Night" 
Charles Black— "Let Carols Ring" 
F. Melius Christiansen— "Lullaby 
Christmas Eve" 
"Lo, How a Rose" 
"Beautiful Saviour" 

Optional Numbers 

Georg Friedrich Handel 1685-1759 

Thanks be to Thee 
(Arioso from "Cantata con stro- 
menti") 
Noble Cain 

Adagio movement to Beethoven 
Sonata Opus 27, No. 2 
Solo — violin and piano 



FAMED MOTET CHOIR LEAVES 
FOR INTENSIVE, ANNUAL 
CONCERT TOUR 

(Continued from Page 1) 
which is a motet for eight voices. 

The modern group opens with the 
number "Praise," and includes other 
numbers as "O Brother Man," "Glory, 
Honor, and Laud." "The Moonlight 
Sonata, and "Music." The last group 
concludes with the Crusader hymn, 
"Beautiful Saviour." 

There are no single solo parts, but 
in their stead, they are capably taken 
by Misses Hochella. Seitzinger, and 
McWilliams. in the form of a well 
blended trio, sounding as one voice, 
and the first alto section doing the 
same in another number. 

The choir is in good shape, and is 
expected to improve as the tour pro- 
gresses, and to be at its best for the 
radio broadcast over WCAU in Phila- 
delphia, from one to one-thiry. this 
Saturday afternoon. The tour in out- 
line form is given below, showing where 
the choir has gone, and where it will be 
in coming days. 

Sunday, April 14. Schuylkill Haven. 
2:30 i). in., Christ Lutheran Church. 

Sunday evening. Pottsville, 7:30 p. m.. 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Rev. Emil W. 
Webei . pastor. 

Monda\ morning, Pottsville High 
School. 1(1 a. in. 

Monday evening, Reading, 8:15' p. 
in.. St. Andrew's Church, Rev. Charles 
E. Roth, pastor. 

Tuesday morning, Reading School 
Assembly, 10:30 a. m. 

Tuesday evening. Her.shey, 8:15 p. m., 
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Rev. H, 
B. lflddleswarth, pastor. 

Wednesday evening. Pottstown, 8:15 
p. m.. Church < t the Transfiguration, 

Rev Richard Kliche. 

Saturday afternoon, l to l :S0 p, m.. 
wcau. Philadelphia, 

Sunday. April 21. Harrlsburg, Forum 
state Educational Building, 3 p. m. 

Sunday evening. Lebanon, 7:30. Leb- 
anon Trinity Lutheran Church, Rev. 
Edward Bchwenk, pastor. 

The complete repertoire oi the choir 
includes: 

PART I. 
Giovanni Pierluigi da Pale,-,trina — 1525- 
15M 

lamentation on Good Friday 

(Sung in Latin) 

trdo Torres 1872- 

Ave Regina caelorum 

i Antlphon Hum the Si cond Ves- 

i m i oi the Purification) 

P ART II. 

Contemporary Engui h Hu lc 
Alec Rowley Prai e 

an accompaniment 



(Continued from Page 1) 
SI SQIEHANNA POSSESSES 
EXCELLENT ATHLETIC SYSTLM 
EVERYBODY ELIGIBLE FOR 
VARSITY, INTRAMURAL TEAMS 
; in golf and in tennis. An estimated 16 
! entries are expected in each. 

The Physical Education Program at 
Susquehanna has three slants: 

1. Training in motor skills to enjoy 
play. This is done thru the Physical 
Education classes — combined play and 
teaching. Next on the program — golf. 

2. Recreation. This will reach most 
of the men through intramural sports. 

3. Participation in inter-collegiate 
sports. This for the Phi Beta Kappa 
athletes. It is interesting to note that, 
because of the small number of men on 

; the campus, over one half of them are 

I on a team. 

The S. U. program is as good as the 

i program in any college in the country. 

j Said Coach Stagg, "By and large, the 
students get more here with the facili- 
ties we have than any place like it." 

This is because five different sports 
are offered the students, and because 
the excellent plant facilities allow large 
squads. Under the present set up the 
whole student body can be members of 
a team. Practically all students, exclud- 
ing music students and commuters, take 
part in the three year physical pro- 
gram. 

And after looking at the practition- 
ers, the conclusion is: What do Tarzan 
and Maureen Sullivan have that S. U. 
doesn't? 

S 



According to an announcement made 
from Dean Gait's office yesterday af- 
ternoon, the Susquehanna students are 
all expected to participate in the Sub- 
Freshman Day activities planned for 
Saturday, May 11. 

Here is one of the ways the dean 
mentioned that each individual could 
aid in making the day a success: Speak 
to Dean Gait. Mr. Yorty. or Mrs. Ul- 
rich and give them the names of per- I 
sonal friends of yours who are seniors 
in high school this year and who will 
be probable candidates for some college 
next fall. The administration officials 
will then send a special invitation to 
each of these, mentioning the person 
who suggested that he be invited. The 
only expense involved for the guest will 
be the transportation to and from Sus- 
quehanna; all events here will be free. 
Every student can be of great ser- 
vice on the campus on Sub-Freshman 
Day, also, the dean emphasized. If each 
student is here, the guests will be able 
to get a much better impression of how 
I Susquehanna actually runs. Then too, 
Susquehannans will want to act as per- 
| sonal entertainers for their special 
I friends. 

Advance reports have been coming in 
already as to the probable number of 
seniors who will attend. Five or more 
carloads will attend from the Hanover 
district; eight cars have been filled 
from both Johnstown and Pittsburgh. 
Many other reports of smaller contin- 
gents have reached the local office al- 
ready. 

S 

Helen Rogers, who graduated from 
the Conservatory of Music last June, 
will be employed as a teacher of 
music in the public schools of Wild- 
wood, N. J., after April 14. 



The Susquehanna University Theatre 
Guild is readying production of their 
second annual play. "Criminal at 
Large," a cheerily eerie drama of mur- 
der, written by the master detective 
writer Edgar Wallace. 

The scenery has been altered and is 
being finished. Chief carpenters John 
Schleig and Eugene Williams report 
that the scenery for the several scenes 
has been completed, and is prepared 
for painting. 

The cast has learned its lines, and is 
now concentrating on characterization 
and projection of the characterization. 
The leading players are Paul Shatto, 
George Spiggle, Louise McWilliams. 
George MacQuesten, Sara Williams, 
Mary Emma Yoder, William Nye. Mar- 
garet Chamberlain, Stanley Baxter. 
Lawrence Cady, and Jack Mayer. 

Student director for "Criminal at 

i Large" is Grace Fries, assisted by a 

| directorial staff of Marie Edlund, 

prompter, and Betty Albury, general 

directorial assistant. 

Philip Bergstresser is chief technical 
adviser for the play. He is assisted by 
Play Production Class members: Don- 
ald Critchfield. Burton Richards, Eu- 
gene Williams, John Schleig, Ken Kin- 
ney, and Stephen Bergstresser. 



The annual spring meeting of the 
Snyder county Federation of Women's 
Clubs will be held at Seibert Hall, Sat- 
urday, April 20. At 10 A. M., Mrs. 
Harold Follmer will give an organ re- 
cital. Discussion groups will be held 
at 11:45 A. M. under the direction of 
Mrs. F. Earle Magee, president of the 
Pennsylvania State Federation of 
Women's Clubs, and Mrs. G. Donald 
Fisher, secretary of the State Feder- 
ation. 

A luncheon will be held in Horton 
Dining Hall at 1 P. M. The afternoon 
session will begin at 2:15 P. M. It will 
be opened by an organ recital played 
by Professor Percy M. Linebaugh of 
the Conservatory of Music faculty. 
There will be group singing and music 
by the Selinsgrove high school en- 

! semble. under the direction of Mrs. 
Alice Giauque. The main addresses of 
the meeting will be given at this ses- 

! sion by Mrs. Magee and Mrs. Fisher. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



Susquehanna Debaters 
Ended Season Thursday 

Debating at Susquehanna came to a 
climax on Thursday evening, April 11, 
when our negative encountered the af- 
firmative of Bucknell University in a 
radio debate from station WKOK at 
Sunbury. Susquehanna was represent- 
ed by Hoover and Booth, while Slade 
and Smith upheld the Bucknell side 
of the issue. 

The question for debate this year 
was. "Resolved, that the basic blame 
for the present European conflict rests 
with the allies." 

This question proved intensely inter- 
esting to the debaters and also to those 
who attended the debates which were 
held in the chapel from time to time. 

Susquehanna was opposed by the 
following colleges: Penn State. Seton 
Hill. Waynesburg. Geneva, Ursinus. 
California State Teachers, Western 
Maryland. Rutgers. Muhlenberg. Buck- 
nell, Dickinson, and Keuka. 

Two trips were taken; one through 
the East, and the other through the 
western part of Pennsylvania. Trips 
of this nature enabled the debaters of 
i S. U. to associate with other students 
and professors as they exchanged views 
, concerning campus life and other items 



of interest. 

Those who saw action this season as 
varsity debaters were: Harry Thatcher. 
Merle Vincent Hoover, Robert Booth. 
Kenneth Wilt, Lawrence Cady, Pierce 
Allen Coryell, Helen Musselman, and< 
Florence Rothermel. 

Special recognition should be given 
to Vincent Frattali who very ably serv- 
ed the position of debate manager for 
the past three years. Frattali gradu- 
ates this year after having been close- 
ly associated with forensic activities 
throughout his college career. 

It is urged that students of Susque- 
hanna who are inclined toward public 
speaking enlist in the ranks of the de- 
bate squad next year. According to 
Debate Coach Russell W. Gilbert, this 
year's freshmen especially have a gold- 
en opportunity to develop into repre- 
sentatives of S. U. on the debate plat- 
form. This includes women as well 
as men. 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



Where's The Gang? 
at 

ERC'S 
Kampus Korner 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERING AND 

INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32- Y 
STORE 145-Y 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL CAFE 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 




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BARBER 
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Sanitary Service 
ONE PRICE FOR 

Hair Cuts £L 



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SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



Compliments of 

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N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Wait 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
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NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Full Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



BRESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To KcuhleW 
SHOE SHINE 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
tltution, Now in its 114 year. 

For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 I .million! 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa, 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 



A.B., B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith. AM., DD„ 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 






Pres. 




200 N. uruuu 



! ! 



Highlights I 

Of the Week 

Track Team Meets Bucknell 

The Crusader cindermen take the 
field against the Bucknell Bisons at j 
3:15 p. m. this afternoon. The local , 
runners are expected to show a much | 
stronger team than that of last year, j 
This will be the first encounter for Sus- ! 
quehanna; Bucknell lost to Blooms- 
burg last Wednesday. 

Variety Show 

The Sigma Alpha Iota Sorority joins \ 
with the Men's Music Guild in present- I 
ing a varied program of selected num- 
bers, including the one-act comedy— | 
"The New Bride." Price of admission, j 
thirty-five cents. 

Lanthorns to be Distributed 

The 1941 Lanthorn will be distributed 
from the Bursar's office between the j 
hours of one and four o'clock Friday j 
afternoon. Each person must appear 
In person to claim his copy. 

Juniata Baseball Team Here 

The baseball team of Juniata College 
will oppose the Crusader nine on the 
home field Saturday afternoon. Both 
teams have shown great strength in 
early-season frays. 

Tennis Team at Juniata 

Coach Stagg's netmen open their 
season against Juniata on the latter's 
courts on Saturday afternoon. The 
match scheduled with Dickinson for 
last Saturday was rained out. 

Motet Sings at Trinity Lutheran 

Susquehanna's Motet Choir will give 
its annual home concert in Trinity 
Lutheran Church this year; it will be 
given this Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p. 
m. Sunday evening the choir will ap- 
pear in St. John's Lutheran Church 
in Lewistown. 

Crusader Nine at Drexel 

Bob Pritchard's hurlers will travel to 
Philadelphia, where they will meet 
Drexel Institute in their fourth test of 
the season. 

Scranton-Keystone Here 

The local tennis team will play host 
to Scranton-Keystone's netmen on 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Junior Recital 

Members of the Junior Class in the 
Conservatory will present their annual 
recital in Seibert Auditorium at 8:15 
p. m. The program includes an attrac- 
tive group of piano and vocal num- 
bers. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXXXYII. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24. 1940 



Number Z 



G 



a.esMonduc,.., Sub-FreshmanDayTo CAMPUS VARIETY SHOW PRESENTS 

He Widely Observed "THE NEW BRIDE" AND SPECIALTIES 




"Open House" on Campus Will Give 

varied and First-Hand contact with loung, Forney, SecMer, and Walters Head Cast 

College to Prospective Students q{ Q omedy; (^^ g^ j^ ( YuSa der QlUir- 

tet, and Malone Offer Novelty Numbers 



Simons to Conduct 
Special Band Clinic 



Noted Conductor Will Speak About 
His Technique in "Simonizing the 
Concert Band" 



Debaters Participate 
In T.K.A. Convention 



The annual convention for the Mid- 
Pennsylvania district of Tau Kappa 
Alpha was held on the campus of Buck- 
nell University on Friday and Satur- 
day of April 19 and 20. The following 
colleges were present and were active 
participants in the contests and ac- 
tivities of the convention: 

Muhlenberg, Ursinus, Hobart, West- 
ern Maryland, Lafayette, Dickinson, 
Upsala, Brothers, Albright. Bucknell 
and Susquehanna. 

The debate contest took place on 
Friday afternoon in which each col- 
lege entered two debaters. The quest- 
ion for debate was: 

Resolved that: "Liberal arts colleges 
should discountinance student discrim- 
ination against freshmen." 

The four best debaters entered the 
final rounds which took place on Sat- 
urday morning in the form of a Par- 
liamentary discussion. Mr. Demnian, of 
Brothers College and Miss Funk, of 
Ursinus were judged final winners of 
the contest. 

Following the annual banquet which 
was held at the Lewisburg Inn the 
group was entertained by the after- 
dinner speaking contest. The subjects 
of these speeches was: 

"What College Has Done for Me." 

The contest was won by Mr Slade of 
Bucknell, while Mr. Metzger of Muhlen- 
berg earned second place. 

The final session of the convention 
concerned the usual business and elect- 
ion of officers. 

Mr. Metzger, a sophomore at Muhlen- 
berg College, was elected district presi- 
dent to succeed Noah Pehl, retiring 
president. Doctor Herbert Wing, of 
Dickinson College was reelected to the 
position of Secretary-treasure, while 
Professor Russell W. Gilbert was ap- 
pointed to the executive council. 

Vincent Fratalli, Robert Booth, Hu- 
bert Pellman. and Kenneth Wilt com- 
prised the delegation which accompan- 
ied Professor Gilbert from Susquehan- 
na to another historic T.K.A. Conven- 
tion. 



"Simonizing the Concert Band" is the 
topic about which Dr. Frank Simon 
will speak at the band clinic which, is 
to be held as one of the features of 
the annual Central Pennsylvania All- 
Master 3and Festival which will meet 
on our campus May 2, 3, and 4. 

Dr. Simon is noted in music circles 
for the unusual tonal effects which he 
uses in order to bring out the splendid 
symphonic structure of his well-known 
Armco Band. He is a competent per- 
former, not only in conducting, but 
has had the experience of playing the 
cornet which makes his presentation 
the wider in its application and value, 
as is well seen in the enthusiastic com- 
ments made by critics. 

Dr. Simon, first, became famous in 
the field of music when he attracted 
the interest of Herman Bellstedt, un- 
der whose capable and expert direction. 
Simon was drilled in the study of the 
cornet. As the "Boy Wonder of the 
Cornet" he appeared with well-known 
; professional bands until he received a 
position in John Philip Sousa's Band. 
In the capacity of premier soloist and 
assistant conductor, Simon rose to 
greater heights, culminating in the 
realization of his desire to have a band 
of his own through the offer of the 
American Rolling Mill Company, of 
Middletown. Ohio. 

Today, he stands in a significant po- 
sition as the Director of the Band De- 
partment at the Cincinnati Conserva- 
tory of Music and is a past-president of 
the American Bandmaster's Associa- 
tion. 

At the band clinic, Miss Leona May 
Smith will speak about "The Effective 
Playing of the Cornet." The assistant 
conductors are Samuel W. Kurtz, mu- 
sic supervisor of the Bloomsburg public 
schools and Donald N. Luckenbill of 
the West Hazleton and the Freeland 
school districts. 



Susquehanna University's Alumni I 
Association is cooperating with the col- 
lege administration at Selinsgrove in 
sponsoring a Sub-Freshman Day on 
the campus, Saturday. May 11. 

Calvin V. Erdly, president of the | 
Alumni Association and superintendent ; 
of the Lewistown schools, has named a ! 
fourteen-member committee to assist 
in the program. This committee con- 
sists of Mathilda E. Neudoerffer, West 
Hazleton; George W. Cassler, Coraopo- I 
lis; Samuel B. Bulick, Scottdale; John 
E. Noonan. Plymouth; Henry R Carich- 
ner, West Pittston; Kent Worthington. 
Canton; William T. Decker. Montgom- 
ery; LaRue C. Shempp, Williamsport; 
Arch A. Aucker. Scranton; Janet M. 
Earhart, Harrisburg; Martha E. Bolig. 
Northumberland; Addison Pohle, Al- 
toona; and Mrs. Park R. Wagner, Som- 
erset. 

"Open House" will be observed on 
the campus during the day so as to 
permit visiting students to observe, first 
hand, college campus routine. Other 
features of the program will include 
short concerts by the Motet Choir and 
the University Band, the annual May 
Day Festival, a collegiate track and 
and tennis match. 

If you know of any prospective stu- 
dent in your home town or elsewhere 
go to Mr. Yorty, Vernon Blough, or 
some other representative and give him 
the student's name so that the college 
can send him the information and sug- 
gest that he make use of the oppor- 
tunity. 

The program for Sub-Freshman Day 
is as follows: 
10:00 a. m. — registration 
10:30 to 11:30 — classroom visitation 
Amateur Radio Demonstration — Sta- 
tion W8TIW— Physics Dept. 
Chemical and Biological Laboratory 
experiments 

Demonstration with business ma- 
chines 

Music Techniques Demonstration — 
Conservatory of Music 
(Alumni and prospective students will 
be allowed to make their own choice of 
classroom visitation — visit as many 
demonstrations as possible or just those 
that students are particularly interest- 
ed in.) 

11:30 a. m. — Chapel Convocation with 
Motet Choir and address by Dr. G. 
Morris Smith, president of Susque- 
hanna University 
12:15 p. m. — Luncheon in college din- 
ing hall 
12:45 to 1:30 — band concert in front 
of Seibert Hall (at this same period, 
prospective students may feel free 
to visit campus and library with vis- 
iting alumni and regular students.) 
2:00 p. m.— May Day Festival 
College track meet— American Uni- 
versity vs. Susquehanna 
College tennis match — Juniata Col- 
lege vs. Susquehanna. 



To Appear Tomorrow 




Dr. Smith Announces 
Commencement Date 



Dr. Bagger to Have Baccalaureate 
Sermon; President Corson to Give 
Commencement Address 



Dr. Harry H. Bagger and Fred Pierce 
Corson are the two men who will figure 
prominently in the graduation exer- 
cises which will bid Susquehanna Uni- 
versity's goodbye to the Class of 1940, 

Dr. Smith has announced. 

I 
Dr. Harry H. Bagger will deliver the , 
Baccalaureate sermon and Fred Pierce 
Corson the Commencement address at 
Susquehanna University's eiehty-sec- ' 
ond commencement come spring. 

Dr. Bagger, who is president of the 
Pittsburgh Synod, will deliver the Bac- 
calaureate sermon in the Trinity Luth- 
eran Church, the local church affiliat- 
ed with Susquehanna. The academic 
procession will form at Selinsgrove 
Hall, and from there inarch directly to 
the church on South Market street. 

Sunday evening at five a special Mu- 
sic Vespers will be held in Seibert Hall 
chapel. 

Alumni Day will be Saturday, June 
first. The schedule, Dr. Smith informs, 
locates lunch at 12:15. and the ban- 
quet at 6 P. M. At this time the mem- 
bers of the graduating class, the class 
of 1940, will be officially inducted into 
• the alumni organization. 

Fred Pierce Corson, who is president 
i of Dickinson College at Carlisle, will 
I give the Commencement address. Dean 
I Gait will present the recommendations 
j for degrees, as approved by the fac- 
' ulty. Dr. G. Morris Smith, president of 
Susquehanna, will then confer them at 
I the formal exercises. Monday evening. 



Tour 



Tomorrow- evening. Thursday. April 
25th. at 8:15 in Seibert Hall Chapel, 
the curtain goes up on the Campus 
Variety Show. The 8. A. I. and the 
Men's Music Guild have combined their 
efforts and talents for this production. 
and a fine show is expected. The long- 
awaited one-act comedy "The New 
Bride." featuring Karl Young, Blanche 
Forney. Clyde Sechler. and Elizabeth 
Walters in leading roles, will be a part 
of the presentation. Other features will 
include David Coren, violinist; Doris 
Welch. Louise McWilliams. and Dor- 
othy Holmes, vocal swing trio; The 
Crusaders Quartet, which includes 
Clyde Sechler, Karl Young, Melvin 
Jones, and Donald Billman; Betty Ma- 
lone. in a comic impersonation; and 
others. A large chorus of mixed voices 
vrill augment the specialty numbers. 

The Campus Variety Show will be of 
particular interest to those who recall 
last year's presentation of "Cleopatra" 
by the Men's Music Guild, since Clyde 
Sechler, the impersonator of Cleopatra, 
will again play a female role in "Tire 
New Bride," this time disguising him- 
self in female attire in an attempt to 
' escape the law. 
The cast: 

James Vaughan Karl Young 

Pudge Blanche Forney- 
Ashley Barr Clyde Sechler 

Helen Vaughan .... Elizabeth Walters 

Betty Byewater Nancy Griesemer 

Edward Tait John Burke 

' Stillson Kenneth Bonsall 

Officer O'Toole Walter Freed 

I Fanchette Ruth Schwenk 

I Officer Fogarty Edison James 



Lanthorn Editor 



rf Us on a Bus" is the Big About Motet 

As Reporter Keveals All gest Scoop of the Year 




' TmL c. shatto 



I'd like to call this "Us on a Bus" or 
"Live Where You're Put and Like It," 
but the editor said not to headline our 
own articles, so there's one sentence 
gone to waste. If you're wondering 
how the choir likes living "where you're 
I put" just listen to a few of the com- 
\ ments as the gang meets to compare 
notes in the morning. 

Schmidt: You should have seenGVun- 
; drum's face when I signed the crieck 
I for that big dinner, "Frederick B. 
Schmidt and party." Yes, we were the 
guests of Ezra Hershey at the Com- 
munity Inn. 

Mrs. Stevens: We had potatoes for 
breakfast! 

Sechler: You should have seen that 
man's cellar! 

The hours in the bus were enlivened 
by songs, puns, wit. and nit-wits with 
certain of thfl fellows outstanding in 

' one or more of these fields. Of course, 
l here was the Crusader's Quartet— Bill- 

i man, Jones, Sechler, and Young- who 

i were introduced In the Reading Ele- 
mentary school by Prof. Stevens as our 

I "four funny men." 

Then there was Corin with his pitch- 
pipe rendition of "Dark Eyes." E>ave 
also proved an excellent "presto wipeo" 
conductor with a facility for varying 



the tempo of the windshield wiper ac- 
cording to the mood of the music. 

Anna Reeder proved to be a "natur- 
al," as they would say in Hollywood, 
with her Pennsylvania Dutch imita- 
tions. And just for variety Dr. Ovrebo 
and Prof. Stevens would talk Norweg- 
ian now and then. 

No account of the trip would be com- 
plete without mentioning the choir's 
visit to the elementary school in Read- 
ing. It was a well -equipped, well- 
managed school and the children and 
the choir seemed equally interested in 
one another. "Emmanuel" captivated 
the hearts of the performers. Emman- 
uel was a little darky with with big. 
soulful eyes who took a solemn and 
flattering interest in the music. 

Italian food— or perhaps it wasn't 
Italian food— seemed to be of interest 
to many of the choir members. In 
Hershey, they gathered at De Angello's 
urant. after betnf assured by the 
proprietor that they could make noise, 
if they so desired. In Philadelphia, a 
group of ten had dinner in Turin's 
Grotto on Saturday night. The more 
conservative stuck to their meat and 
potatoes, while the more adventure- 
some indulged in antipasto and Italian 
spaghetti and meat balls. Sally Stev- 



ens proved very adept at spaghetti- 
twirling, while Ginny Mann was defin- 
itely a novice. 

Later in the evening, many of the 
choir people were to be seen at the 
Academy of Music where, as Prof. 
Stevens puts it, they "rushed the Gods^ 
or, as you might put it. "sat in the 
peanut gallery." The Philadelphia Or- 
chestra, conducted by Eugene Ormondy, 
played an all Tchaikowsky program— 
I program capable of arousing more 
emotions and enthusiasm than a four 
star movie. If you want an account of 
audience reaction, ask Schmidt what 
happened when they started playing 
the theme, known to most of you as 
'Moon Love." of the second movement 
of Symphony No. 5. Your candid re- 
porter was too busy reacting to the 
music himself to make any observa- 

Those who were not at the Academy 

of Music saw movies or visited the 
Planetarium. Of course, the ston 
Philadelphia were honored by the pat- 
ronage of the choir members in the 
afternoon. 

After the Harrisburg and Lebanon 
concerts on Sunday, forty-five very 
sleepy people returned to the campus 
shortly after midnight. 



1941 Lanthorn Ready 
For Distribution 



Paul Shatto has announced that the 
1941 Lanthorn is ready for distribution 
and may be gotten by appearing in 
person at the Bursar's office Friday af- 
ternoon from one to four o'clock. Those 
who have seen the book applaud it M 
the most original production for many 
\eais 

With the ■appearance of this issue the 
Lanthorn mark* its forty-second an- 
nual edition, having appeared first In 
the year 1897. 

The book this year will be out si.. 
in in its informal presentation, dedi- 
cation, and make-up. 

The cover is ot two-tone blue leather 

and carries on the cover of each copy 
an individual photograph symbol! 
the name Lanthorn; the pictures are 
ned by the new duPnnt process 
uaranteed not to loosen. 
The dividers between departments 
are full-page spreads featuring an 
proprtate door and ■ symbolic picture. 
The Lanthorn is a picture and ston 
review of our administration, our 
(lasses, organiaationa, act ni'ie-. and 
athletics. A new feature this year wih 
(Continued on Page 4> 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.00 a Year. Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove. Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

Reporters: Margaret Grenoble. '40; Anne Hill, '40; Virginia Mann. '40; G. Rob- 
ert Booth. '41 ; Miriam Garner, '41 ; Merle Hoover, '41 ; Jane Hutchinson, '41 ; 
Eleanor Smith. '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; Blair Heaton, '42; 
Ruth Schwenk, '42; Willard Sterrett, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor- 
yell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; Ella Fetherolf, '43; Charles Gundrum, '43; Dan 
MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson, '43. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Advertising Manager Paul Shoemaker 

Easiness Assistants: Delphine Hoover, Robert MacQuesten, Stanley Stonesifer, 

Rex Sunday. Frank Morgan, and Dorothy Weber. 
Faculty Advisors: Editorial. Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1940 

SUB-FRESHMAN DAY 

This year Susquehanna is adding a Sub-Freshman Day to 
her spring program, and is asking the wholehearted cooperation 
of students, faculty, administration, and alumni in making the 
project a success. 

This new feature is hailed by authorities as one of the 
best methods known for discovering good college material, for 
interesting those students in any particular college, and for ac- 
quainting them with real college life so that their period of ori- 
entation may not be so difficult. For this THE SUSQUEHANNA 
lauds the efforts of those responsible for this addition. 

The sub-freshman day idea is an old one and is used to- 
day by all the larger and more progressive institutions. We 
find, however, that where it is most successful is in those schools 
where the entire student body cooperates with administrative 
officials. At Gettysburg, for example, student cooperation is 
especially fine, the members of the various classes taking part 
in activities throughout the entire day. Susquehanna encour- 
ages such student cooperation and invites each student to do 
his bit in making our sub-freshman day a real success. 

The plan is this. If you have a friend or acquaintance who 
is a senior in high school this year and who you believe will 
make a good college student, step into either the alumni office 
or the registrar's office and report the name or names. These 
persons will then be invited personally by the university officials 
to spend May 11 with us and to take part in the program ar- 
ranged. By cooperating in this small detail each student can 
add greatly to the success of the event. 

Another splendid opportunity for us students to be of ser- 
vice is in providing entertainment for the high school seniors 
while they are here. Aside from those students who will take 
part in the events of the day, such as the band concert, May 
Day, classroo mdemonstrations, and the track and tennis con- 
tests, there will be a need for students to act as individual 
"guides" or "hosts" for the visitors; you can be helpful even 
though there are none of your acquaintances here. There will 
be opportunity for all faculty members to be on hand as Am- 
bassadors of good will for our guests. 

By a little genuine cooperation for this one day, we can 
assure Susquehanna a larger number of better students for next 
year. 

S 

ON ELECTIONS 

With the coming of another election season at Susquehanna 
this staff feels the responsibility of counseling each student to 
weigh the candidates upon the balance of leadership ability 
rather than upon the personal considerations which so often 
rule. 

Democracy at Susquehanna is remarkably similar to dem- 
ocracy in our state and national governments — in the former as 
in the latter, the success and permanence of democratic methods 
depends upon the ability of the individual elector to choose able 
men for leaders. 

To this end it behooves each person to search for the real 
ability to lead among the list of candidates and to support the 
person with that ability even though it may necessitate "step- 
ping over the fraternity traces." 

For he who would make his fraternity great, may we pre- 
sent this opinion — the soundest method to use in getting more 
men into offices is by presenting better candidates and not by 
buying more votes for second-rate candidates; this is not only 
cheaper but it builds up a good prestige for your group rather 
than a bad one. 
EXCHANGE NEWSPAPERS 

It is a comman practice for college newspaper staffs to ex- 
change papers with other colleges. In this way the staff is able 
to get an idea of what other newspapers are like and is often 
able to improve greatly the local publication by incorporating 
ideas in this way. 

Also, by receiving the student newspapers of colleges in this 
area one is able to keep in touch with happenings at other 
schools and with friends who may be attending there. We feel, 
therefore, that these newspapers will be of interest to all stu- 
dents and not merely to THE SUSQUEHANNA staff. With this 
in mind, we will display each week on the newspaper table in 
the library newspapers from several colleges for use by all stu- 
dents. 



Ancient Moravian Colony at Beth- PREVIEWS 
lehem Intrigues S. U. Reporter ■■■ 



What will Susquehanna University 
be like in the year 2056? What will Sel- 
insgrove be like then? Will there be 
ancient buildings containing historical 
antiques and legends? Will there be 
attractive guides dressed in costume of 
the period when Susquehanna was 
founded to show the visitor about? Will 
the guides point out only buildings that 
are well over a hundred years old, 
scoffing at those which are a mere 
ninety -two? 

This and more is offered the visitor 
to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where 
long ago the Moravians founded Mo- 
ravian College and Theological Semi- 
nary, and Moravian College for Wom- 
en. There one can really see the eigh- 
teenth century. Some day, perhaps, 
people will come to Susquehanna to 
see the nineteenth century when it 
too is far distant. 

The college buildings, could they 
speak, might tell of great men who 
walked their corridors — men such as 
Washington, Franklin, von Steuben, 
Pulaski, John Paul Jones, Adams, and 
Drs. Warren and Lewis; for, during the 
Revolution, this was a hospital for the 
Continental Army. The place abounds 
in legends: great vaulted meat cellars 
that are called dungeons, an opening to 
what was once an underground passage 
used to escape Indians and later a part 
of the Underground Railroad, and a 
stain on the floor of an attic said to 
be the blood of Lafayette who lay there 
wounded. This latter legend is said 



by the authorities to be quite false, 
and they discourage going up to see 
the stain. 

The Moravian church is very beauti- 
ful having an especially lovely belfry, 
from which the famous trombones are 
played at festive seasons. And then 
there is God's Acre— the old graveyard 
— with its uniform headstones all set 
very unostentatiously level with the 
ground. 

There are old buildings of hand hewn 
virgin timber logs, and buildings of 
stone, rough fleldstone and quarried 
stone, which have great buttresses to 
prevent sinking, for underlying the soil 
is limestone. Inside the buildings are 
tall case clocks, HL hinges, and a 
museum of early Moravian antiques. 

In addition, the guide — wearing the 
traditional old Moravian costume of a 
violet-grey color with the quaint point- 
ed "Schnabel" cap worn by the women 
as late as the Civil War period— will 
show you "Die Apotheke," the oldest 
drug store in continuous existence in 
this country. Here is the 1752 fireplace 
with its ancient retorts, the old blown 
glass bottles, the show globes, and 
delft jars for gums and resins, in fact 
the most nearly complete collection of 
early American pharmaceutical equip- 
ment in the United States. 

And so, we wonder what our descen- 
dants of 2056 A. D. will find when they 
come to the school that great-great 
grandpa or grandma attended. 



'THE CAMPUS COI.TC" 



Lawrence says that she fell for the 
1940 Buick and that is all. He also 
suggests that there might be a ring 
connected with it. But I disagree, 
Dottie doesn't seem the type to get 
hooked so early in her young life. Or 
is she just on the end of a line, now? 

Can you imagine it? It is the most 
remarkable thing on the campus in a 
coon's age. It has finally happened. 
It has been reported to me by my 
sabotage system that Chuck and June 
have finally called it all off. When 
asked for a statement for the press, 
Chuck exclaimed, "Just put it down 
to personalities." Perhaps it's the 
weather and the rain has dampened 
the flame or is it extinguished? 

Since Cutie No. 1 got his hair cut, 
he spends more time combing it now 
than before. He was timed by a stop 
watch and it took him 30 minutes and 
12.9 seconds. Vanity vanity, all is van- 
ity. But how can he spend over a half 
hour? To me it's unbelievable. 

Coach it seems has turned the tennis 
courts into a vegetable garden and 
from where I sit it appears that he is 
going to have his tennis team plant- 
ing corn soon. It is one thing sure 
that this year the boys won't get blis- 
ters on their hands from their bats 
but hard callouses and bent backs from 
handling hoes. I do wish he had plant- 
ed tomatoes instead of corn. 

Perhaps I am wrong but I think that 
Mr. Eddie Richards is just a freshman 
at this school. But, on April 16, 1940 
he received a letter from the University 



of Chicago. It started as follows: As 
your graduation approaches — . Par- 
don me, but I think there must be some 
mistake or has he just covered himself 
up and concealed his depths from us. 
He certainly must be important to have 
THE ONE AND ONLY University of 
Chicago write to him about his gradu- 
ate courses already. Tell us Ed. just 
what are you going to take up? 

Question of the week: What was 
the cuddle club on the motet trip and 
just what did Dr. Ovrebo mean when 
he said "Unravel yourself and let's do 
some singing?" 

Lately it seems that Allah has been 
having trouble. I mean her eyes. They 
tell me she is slowly going blind in one 
eye. I guess it comes from the fact of 
being dazzled by two such charming 
men as Warner and Popeye. There 
was Popeye standing outside the show 
waiting for her, (funny, I thought he 
always met her on the inside) and does 
she come out alone? No. (curses) She 
was on the arm of that distinguished 
Brummel, Warner. Can you imagine 
Hook's face. Boy I can, fiery red. 

That will be all folks except for the 
fact that when Hutch and Fisher leave 
the campus you would expect them to 
go in the same direction, but no. She 
goes to Bucknell, which seems quite 
the popular thing to do. along with go- 
ing to Va.. and he goes to visit Johnie. 
I wish someone would straighten me 
out. 

Yours truly, 



Wednesday and Thursday, 
April 24 and 25 

ROAD TO SINGAPORE is a roman- 
tic musical comedy produced by Para- 
mount and stars Dorothy Lamour, Bing 
Crosby, and Bob Hope. The three 
stars of screen and radio fame combine 
their popular talents to produce a rare 
musical treat. Hollywood treats this 
new musical with added deftness and 
appeal taken from the tropical settings 
in the East. Bob Hope scores a hit 
with his humorous and naive impres- 
sions in this new picture. 

Friday, April 26 

Metro's production MAN FROM DA- 
KOTA is a colorful melodrama star- 
ring Wallace Beery, John Howard, and 
Delores Del Rio. Wallace Beery gives 
a grand performance as the "Man from 
Dakota" in a portrayal which is con- 
ceded to be the epitome of a western 
hero. John Howard and Delores Del 
Rio also give commanding perform- 
ances as they lend a thrilling romantic 
touch to the otherwise monotonous 
prairie setting, and the colorless hills 
of Dakota. 

Monday, April 29 

BRITISH INTELLIGENCE starring 
Boris Karloff, Margaret Lindsey, and 
Bruce Lester deals with the intense ac- 
tivity of this organization during the 
last war as they sought to track down 
and apprehend spies and obtain infor- 
mation from the hands of the enemy. 
The story has little in it that everyone 
does not know, and as result provides 
only little in the way of entertain- 
ment to the audience. Margaret Lind- 
say provides the picture with bits of 
exciting moments as a member of this 
great organization which rose to such 
fame during the last war. 

Tuesday, April 30 

Paramount's production SEVEN- 
TEEN provides a pleasing comedy for 
juveniles starring Jackie Cooper, Betty 
Field, and Otto Kruger. The attrac- 
tion is a clever screen show of the ro- 
mantic dreams of two youthfuls whose 
reality is more like a cloud in the sky. 



Bobby O'Conner To 
Sing at Junior Prom 



RAIN DROPS" 



tt 



"All night long the raindrops 
sprinkle." And comes an eight o'clock 
—they're still sprinkling! Ah, I think 
of that old rhyme: 

"If it starts before seven, 
It'll quit before eleven." 

This certainly started well before 
seven— sometime last week, to be ex- 
act. Comes eleven: 
"Rain on the roof, 

I hear the patter of the rain on the 
roof." 

Then I say to myself that this is 
only the tenth day and that leaves 
thirty days and nights before we catch 
up with the world's record. 

Meanwhile: 

Were they the Motet widows I saw 
in a conclave singing "Stormy Weath- 
er"? Yes, there's Jeannie Fenner join- 
ing them (he went to Hazleton) as 
they get to "—it's raining all the ti- 
lme." And what is more, gals, from 
the looks of things, it will be raining 
Monday when they are back on cam- 
pus. 

Bill Davis's tune was slightly differ- 
ent. I am pretty sure it was he I 
heard lamenting: "Water, water every- 
where and not a drop to drink." 

There really weren't many people on 
campus this week-end (what nice 
weather those who were away missed) 
to furnish copy for a reporter, but I 
saw Betts and George long enough to 
observe that their newest theme song 
was, "Let it rain, let it pour, nothing 
bothers us." Spechtie and Bac varied 
it with, "Every time it rains, it rains 
pennies from heaven." 



A rain hat is usually a very peculiar 
bird. Some of them, like Snooky's new 
blue one, are pretty tricky, and then 
there are the kind that aren't legiti- 
mate rain hats, like the one that Mc- 
Cartney is now wearing so that his 
mother will think that he wore it all 
winter. The conventional rain hat for 
girls, as you will notice if you watch a 
young lady stepping out into the down- 
pour, keeps the rain off every part of 
her head except where curls are found. 
If you watch the same young lady 
when she comes in from the downpour 
you will soon see that the rain hat is 
still keeping the rain from the young 
lady's head — that is, except where curls 
were to be found when she went out. 

A fellow's rain hat is usually a cross 
between last year's Sunday hat and an 
inverted waste basket. Several out- 
standing chapeaux of this monsoon 
were worn by Eunie Arentz, Deardorf, 
and Burton Richards. Then there are 
babushkas— which in most cases neith- 
er look nice nor keep the rain off, but 
maybe the wearers like "Running be- 
tween the raindrops." 

Last week, while on a trip down 
town, I chanced to peer out from un- 
der my umbrella and what should I 
see and hear but a duet coming from 
the other side of the street to the ef- 
fect of: "We walked together in April 
rain, the city streets were country 
lanes." (No, they weren't in Sunbury, 
but town doesn't fit the rhythm.) At 
least I thought that Ernie and Peg 
could be singing that. Sally, in all her 
exuberance, was singing to herself 
(Continued on Page 4) 



One of the biggest days of Susque- 
hanna's school year. May 11, 1940, will 
have a grand slam ending with the 
Junior Prom. Graced by the presence 
of our lovely May queen, one of the 
smoothest bands in this section of the 
state will subjugate itself to the fes- 
tive spirit of the occasion, by playing 
superbly any style from suave swing 
io low down barrel- -touse tactics. 

Rex Rockwell's band, noted for its 
versatility and distinctive arrange- 
ments, will do much to contribute to 
the success of a gala social event 
which has no peer in the realm of the 
Susquehanna society doings. The band 
was formerly led by Bill Bottorf of 
State College who at the present time 
is incarcerated in an Arizona health 
resort, as a result of over work. 

The band sports a new singer in the 
form of Bobby O'Conner, who former- 
ly sang with Dick Stabile's orchestra. 

In using five reeds, six brasses, and 
four rhythm, the band achieves a ton- 
al balance, and rhythmic tonal soli- 
darity which is distinctly pleasing to 
the ears of their many listeners. 

Many alumni have already sent in 
their requests for tickets and Saturday 
night, May 11, 1940 will find a large 
number of alumni dancers present. 

The decorations for the gymnasium 
will be erected by a Harrisburg decor- 
ating company. The contract calls for 
three massive lantern type lights on 
each girder, with sport scenes and lat- 
tice work supporting smaller lanterns 
along the sides of the building. The 
lighting will give the gym a subdued 
effect and the entrance will be decor- 
ated with two seven foot flower tow- 
ers. 

Tickets for the Prom are on sale at 
the present time and may be secured 
from Harry Thatcher, Elaine Miller, 
Douglas Portzline, Karl Young, and 
Don Ford. 

S 

DINNER AND THEATRE PARTY 
HELD BY OMEGA DELTA SIGMA 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority had a 
pinner party at the Homestead Inn 
on Monday evening, April 22. After the 
dinner the girls attended the theatre, 
where John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and 
Men" was being shown. 

This evening, Wednesday, April 24, 
the sorority will continue its series of 
lectures. Mrs. Gait will discuss social 
life in Cairo. 

The honoraries of Omega Delta 
Sigma presented the sorority with a 
beautiful coffee table and two pictures 
for their room. 



_S- 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<$>- 



-«• 



CRUSADERS TRIM SCRANTON-KEYSTONE 
IN SECOND BASEBALL WIN BY 15-1 



tt 



RANDOM SPORTS" 






1 



Coach Pritchard's undefeated nine 
will meet Juniata College on the uni- 
versity diamond this Saturday. High 
spirited by their previous victories, the 
Crusaders will try to keep their slate 
clean in this game. One or two pos- 
sible changes may be seen in the Sus- 
! quehanna lineup but in all probability 
' the same nine which have started in 
the other games will see service again 
on the diamond. 

Juniata comes with a strong team 
which is characteristic of the school. 
They will come here from Ursinus, 
where they play Friday. Last year 
they defeated Susquehanna in a close 
game, the score being 7-6. The Cru- 
saders will not only be interested in 
keeping their clean slate but in aveng- 
ing that defeat. Two fine teams will 
swing into action at 2:30 Saturday af- 
ternoon; so come and lend your sup- 
port. 



Gensel Hurls Orange and Maroon Nine to Easy 
Victory on Local Field; Seventh Inning Drive 
Nets Nine Runs; Visitors Lose on Errors 

€>- ' ■ 

With a spurt that netted 13 runs in fViiaji/lpre i ft Wmii 
the sixth and seventh innings, Coach vlUMUCla IU lTl""l 
Bob Pritchard's Crusaders completely T , 

swamped a helpless Keystone Junior .llltlintn Oil Sfltl11*flflV 
College nine yesterday afternoon to the * U1,UUa UU tf«UUIUdJ 
tune of 15-1. 

Held to a 1-1 tie up until the fifth 
inning, the Orange and Maroon slowly 
opened up to win the game in style 
with John Gensel allowing only 3 hits 
in the entire game. Gensel showed 
real form in his first real try-out of 
the season as a relief pitcher. 

Sandone opened up for the Scranton 
team, but after the sixth, he was 
knocked from the mound after he had 
given the Crusaders 12 hits. He was 
replaced by Shimer. 

In the fifth inning the Crusaders 
took the upper hand as one run crossed 
the plate. 

In the sixth inning the drive was 
made with Kaltreider up first, and on 
an error by the visitors' shortstop he 
reached first. Klinger next up, struck 
out, as well as Schleig, but on this 
Kaltreider stole to second. Zavarich 
by an error of the shotstop brought 
"Bucky" to third and Zubac who got 
his base on balls filled the sacks. Gen- 
sel then smashed out a two bagger and 
brought in three runs. Larry Isaacs, 
next up, drove Gensel across home 
plate, but Isaacs was caught between 
second and third on Ford's bouncer to 
second base. This putout retired the 
side. 

In the fast moving seventh inning, 
Lewis was first to the plate, only to 
strike out. Then Kaltreider singled to 
left field, followed by Klinger, who also 
singled. Schleig arrived at first base by 
an error through the shortstop, which 
brought Kaltreider over the plate. 
Zavarich then stepped up only to swat 
a fly ball to center field. Zubac singled 
to drive in two runs and Gensel walk- 
ed. Isaacs loaded the bases by an- 
other error of the visitor's shortstop, 
and Ford singled to bring in two more 
runs. Tom Lewis stepped up to the 
plate, stretched, and singled to right 
field which brought in Isaacs and Ford. 
Kaltreider singled, sending Lewis to 
second and Klinger also singled to 
again fill the bases. Schleig walked, 
forcing Lewis across the plate and 
Zavarich walked, scoring Kaltreider. 
Wolf, who was batting for Zubac, hit 
to shortstop and was stopped at first 
to retire the side. 

The lineup: 
Susquehanna AB R H A E 

Gensel, p 4 3 2 2 

Klinger, c 5 2 1 1 

Zeravica, lb 5 1 1 

Ford, 2b 5 1 2 4 

Kaltreider, ss 5 3 3 2 $ 

Isaacs, 3b 5 1 1 2 1 

Zavarich, If 5 1 

Zubac, cf 4 3 1 

Schleig, rf 5 1 

Lewis, lb 2 1 1 7 

x Wolf, If 1 



With weather conditions as they have i 
been for the last few weeks I think it 
would be a good idea for Susquehanna 
to introduce a new sport on the cam- 
pus, rowing. You will probably think 
this statement a little wild but if you 
took notice to the track last Saturday 
you would not doubt me. The water 
was at least two feet (slight exagger- 
ation) deep. At least it was deep 
enough for a small shell to float around 
in. 

All joking aside we can look forward 
to some interesting fights today in our 
encounter with the Buckeyes after 
their poor showing against Bloomsburg. 
Their times were much poorer than 
some of ours. A good guess would be 
to say that S. TJ. will be stronger in 
the distance runs and Bucknell should 
take the dashes. In the field events 
our lads should run into trouble in 
everything except the high jump and 
the broad jump. All in all the meet 
should be very close and a good one 
to watch. 

It is true that the times turned in 



by the local boys have not been cham- 
pionship results, but they are good 
considering they are mere trials and 
the real effort is not extended till one 
gets into stiff competition. You can 
expect the boys to do a good bit better 
in the meet than they do in practice. 
The last few days of practice have 
worked on the imaginations of some 
of the spring athletes. It was suggested 
by one of the oldtimers that the track 
team should buy some new outfits, 
consisting of oilskin suits, inflated 

shoes, and water wings. It was also 
suggested that the out fielders take 
along life preservers so that if they fell 
into some of the deep places they 
would be in no danger. 

The highlight of the rainy season 
came when Eugene Smith dug up some 
grubs from the pole vaulting pit and 
gave them to Ox Leam who proceeded 
to bait the crossbar. He says he caught 
six trout right out of the stream run- 
ning around the field. But there are 
some people who doubt the story. 



Crusader Trackmen 
Meet Bucknell Today 



B. and K. Wins Inter- 
Frat Ping Pong Games 

On Thursday evening the pelleteers 
from Bond and Key invaded Keta 
Kappa and was victorious, winning four 
games out of five. The little celluloid 
ball clicked hard and fast as one op- 
ponent after another faced each other 
across the hardwood. 

In the first set Red Mitman topped 
Willard Schadle, 21-11, 21-23, 21-10. 
Burt Richards won over Herbie Kling- 
er 21-12, 22-20. Stan Baxter took Sarge 
Meek into camp 21-13, 21-7. Merle 
Hoover, captain of the Beta Kappans, 
was defeated by Arky Ford 16-21, 21-13, 
21-12. In the finale Jack Shipe de- 
feated Gene Williams 21-9, 21-12. 

Last evening Bond and Key nosed 
out Phi Mu in a thriller by winning 
three out of five. 

On Thursday, April 25, Beta Kappa 
journeys to Phi Mu and on the follow- 
ing Tuesday Beta Kappa plays at Bond 
and Key. 

S 



Junior Recital to 
Be Held in Chapel 






Totals 15 11 17 3 

xBatted for Zubac in 7th. 
Scranton Keystone AB R 



Shimer, p 1 

Sandone. p 3 

Conrad, c 3 

Figlimene, lb 3 

Wagner, 2b 3 

Fordham, ss 3 

Mahlchic, 3b 3 

McAndres, If 3 

Evans, cf 3 

Lepri, rf 2 



H A E 



1 

9 

2 
3 
I 

n 


o 



Totals 1 3 18 7 

Susquehanna 001014 9—15 

Scranton Keystone ..0010000—1 

Errors — Susquehanna — 3 I Zeravica, 
Isaacs, Klinger); Scranton Keystone 7, 
•Fordham 2, McAndrew, Maholchic 4). 

Two base hits— Kaltreider, Gensel, 
Maholchic. 

Stolen bases— Kaltreider, Isaacs, Zu- 
bac, Kaltreider, Klinger, Figliomene. 

Bases on balls— Off Gensel 2; San- 
done 4. 

Double play— Kaltreider, Ford, Zera- 
vica. 

Winning pitcher— Gensel. 

Losing pitcher— Sandone. 

Umpire — Spangler, 

S 

Good Guess 

Clerk <in men's clothing store): "I 
assume you are looking for something 
bl men's clothing?" 

Lady: "I certainly am. Have you 
seen my husband around here?" 



On Tuesday evening, April 30, at 8:15 
p. m., in Seibert Chapel will be held the 
Junior Recital which is given annually 
by those Conservatory students who 
are majoring in a special field of music. 
The soloists will be Melissa Smoot, 
Faith Harbeson, and Elsie Hochella; 
Prof. Linebaugh will be the organist 
for the Concerto numbers. 

The program will be as follows: 

1. Piano — Concerto in D minor— Men- 
delssohn 

(First Movement) 

Melissa Smoot 
Prof. Linebaugh at the organ 

2. Aria— "Oh! had I Jubals lyre" (Josh- 
ua) Handel 

Faith Harbeson, soprano 
Betty Malone at the piano 

! 3. Piano — a. Berceuse Chopin 

; b. Bolero Chopin 

Elsie Hochella 

4. Songs— a. Romance Debussy 

b. Chanson Norvegienne ..Fourdrain 

Faith Harbeson 

5. Piano — a. A Tale MacDowell 

b. The Enchanted Nymph . . Levitski 

Melissa Smoot 

6. Piano — Concertstucke Weber 

Elsie Hochella 
Prof. Linebaugh at the organ 

Linebaugh, Dietrick 
Give Short Recitals 



Today the trackmen open their 1940 
season in a dual meet with Bucknell 
University on our field and track. Last 
year our boys went to Bucknell and 
suffered a set-back 105 to 21, but this 
year the team has improved and should 
do considerably better, due to the re- 
turn of a large number of last year's 
major lettermen and other candidates. 

It is still early in the season, and 
there has not been much accomplish- 
ed except for the routine practice, 
mostly due to the bad weather and the 
slow condition of the track. Time 
trials have been postponed as Coach 
Stagg has advised against it for fear 
of injury. There are a number of new 
freshmen that have come out which 
show promise of great improvement 
later in the season. 

The probable entries will include 
Deardorf, Shusta, and Leib in the 100 
yard dash, and Deardorf, Shusta, and 
Heaton in the 220. There are several 
entries in the quarter mile including 
Shusta, Curry, Ed Rogers, Smith, and 
Wilcox. In the half mile run, Templin, 
Kemberling, G. MacQuesten. Wolf- 
gang, and Hudspeth will compete, while 
the mile race will be run solely by Bob 
MacQuesten, and the two mile race by 
Thatcher and Troutman. Bill Pritch- 
ard and Monk Meyers will run both 
the high and the low hurdles. 

In the field events, Fred Warner, 
Heaton, and Hugus will be entered in 
the high jump, and it is quite probable 
that we will take first and second 
places. In the pole vault, Leam, Her- 
man, Musser, Hugus, and Hudspeth are 
also entered, while in the broad jump, 
Burt Richards, Pritchard, Heaton, and 
Leam should be able to place. In the 
weights, Heaton. Templin, Martin, Mc- 
Fall, Hall, and Baylor should give some 
competition in the shot put, and Kauf- 
man, Heaton. Templin, Blough, Hall, 
and Baylor should give Bucknell a little 
trouble in the discus throw. Warner, 
Richards, Wolfe, and Pasterchick all 
will be doing their best in the javelin 
throw. 

ORDER OF EVENTS 
Running Events 

1 Mile Run 
440 Yard Run 
100 Yard Dash 

120 Yard High Hurdles 
880 Yard Run 
220 Yard Dash 

2 Mile Run 

220 Yard Low Hurdles 
Weights and Jumps 
Pole Vault 
High Jump 
Shot Put 
Discus 
Broad Jump 
Javelin Throw 

S 



strand 

T ti I A T ■ t 
sunbury 



THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND 

SATURDAY 

APRIL 25, 26, 27 

Deanna Durbin 

Kay Francis 
Walter Pidgeon 

"It's A Date" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
APRIL 29, 30 

Jean Arthur 
Fred MacMurray 
Melvyn Douglas 

"Too Many 
Husbands" 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 

Edward G. Robinson 

"Dr. Elrich's Magic 
Bullets 



.99 



THURSDAY, MAY 2 

Lawrence Olivier 
Joan Fontaine 

REBECCA" 



"l 



BEST WISHES FOR A 
SPEEDY RECOVVERY 



The ten o'clock meeting of the Sny- 
der County Federation of Women's 
Clubs opened with an organ recital by 
Alice Deiterick. Miss Deiterick played 
Preludo by Guilmant, Nocturne by Fer- 
rata, Pastel by Thompson. The March 
i in C by Cad man was played as the 
processional for the Girl Scouts. 

Prof. Percy M. Linebaugh gave a re- 
cital at 2:15. His program consisted of 
Rippling Brook by Gillette, Lead Kind- 
ly Light by Lemare and Largo by Han- 
del. 



Mrs. Paul J. Ovrebo is reported to be 
improving at her home at 210 Chestnut 
street, after undergoing an operation 
at the Lankenau Hospital in Philadel- 
phia several weeks ago. Susquehan- 
nans join in wishing Mrs. Ovrebo a 
sptPdy recovery. 



Hm-m! 

The teacher was testing the knowl- 
edge of the kindergarten class. Toss- 
ing a half dollar on the desk, she said 
sharply. "What is that?" 

Instantly a voice from the back of 
the room replied, "Tails!" 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • • 

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 

Wallace Beery 
Dolores Del Rio 

"The Man From 
Dakota" 

SATURDAY. APRIL 27 

Vincent Price 

"The Invisible 
Man Returns" 

MONDAY, APRIL 29 

Boris Karloff 
Margaret Lindsay 

"British 
Intelligence" 

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 

Jackie Cooper 

"SEVENTEEN" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
MAY 1 AND 2 

ERROL FLY NN 
MIRIAM HOPKINS 

"VIRGINIA CITY" 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
MAY 3 AND 4 

"PINOCCHIO" 



Compliments of 

KLINE'S 

MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



Farmers National 
Bank 

Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are Interested in a Bigger 
SUSQUEHANNA 

and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 

Let as join hands in Making Thi» 
Come True 



VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna, 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Typewriters 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 

The %*q£l Store 

Registered Drag Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA, 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

S25 Market St 706 Market St 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COAT8. DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



DIAMONDS WATCHES 

Have Your Watch Repaired Now. 

No Watch Too Small. All 

Work Guaranteed. 

W, M. VALSING 

Jewel* Selinsgrove, Pa. 



TTDOL VEEDOL 

RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa, 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 
Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK TnAT 
OVER! 



Watsontown Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 

AND 

PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa, Paxtonville, Pa 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1940 



Irene Shure Writes 
May Day Pageant 



See Assembly Plant 



A May Day really of and by Susque- 
hanna University for students, pros- 
pective students, and townspeople will 
be presented May 11 in the May court 
in front of the rock garden at Hassing- 
er Hall. The really part comes from 
the fact that the May Day festival is 
not only enacted by Susquehannans; 
it is written by a Susquehannan as 
well. 

Miss Irene Shure. instructor of Phy- 



Harbeson andCrompton Business Society to 

Made Sorority Heads 

At sorority meetings held this past 
Wednesday evening the members of 
Kappa Delta Phi and Sigma Alpha 
Iota sororities elected their officers for 
the coming year. The officers for 

Omega Delta Sigma will be chosen at I pi an t in that city tomorrow, April 25. 
a future meeting. ; The society extends a cordial invitation 

The members of S. A. I. who were j t0 a u. the commercial students, and 
chosen as officers are: Faith Harbeson, , an yone else who would be interested 
president; Jean Warner, vice-president; m the trip. Reservations for transpor- 
Elsie Hochella, sergeant at arms; Nancy j tation are being taken in the Book 
Griesemer, secretary; Janet Shockey, ! Room now. The period for making 



Motet Will End Season Proctors Committee 
With Local Concerts Entertained by Gaits 



The Business Society is planning a 
trip to Berwick to inspect the Assembly 



treasurer; Esther Seitzinger, chaplain. 
The officers for K. D. P. are : Marion 
Crompton. president; Betty Brand, 



Hometown; Mt. Carmel 



sic nl Education and Director of Girls : vice -president; Lois Schweitzer, secre 
Work, has again repeated her feat of tary . Miriam TJnangst. financial secre 
the past two years in writing the May tan .. Elizabeth Reese, treasurer. 
Day pageant. g 

Miss Shure conducted a contest for 
plots among the students of her 
eurythmics classes. The wanning plot 
was submitted by Clyde Sechler who 
will play the jester in the pageant. 

The leading roles are enacted by 
Mary Emma Yoder as queen for the 
pageanl and Karl Young as the Lord 
Mayor. An English Village is celebrat- 
ing its traditional May Day festival. 
The celebration is divided into three 



D. T. McKelvey, Jr., president of the 
Hazleton Susquehanna Alumni Club, 
announced that the arrangements are 
completed for the club's annual ban- 
quet to be held at Scrafford's Inn, 
Hometown. Wednesday at 6:30 o'clock. 
April 24. 

Prof. Russell Gilbert will be the 
parts. The Procession for which the speaker. H 
actors are Johnny Smith, as page; Paul at tend. 

Ovrebo, Jr., as crown bearer, Karl Susquehanna University alumni in 
Young as the mayor, Neil Fisher as the 'Mt. Carmel. Shamokin. Ashland and 
trumpeter, Jack Helm as the minstrel, surrounding communities are having 
Clyde Sechler as jester, August Kauf- | their annual banquet at the Marble 
man as the prince; Michael Wolf, Jack | Hall Hotel in Mt. Carmel, on Tuesday, 
Walsh and Harold Mitman are, with ' April 23. The principal speaker will be 
Jack Helm, the suitors; Vincent Frat- | Dr. G. Morris Smith, 
tali is the sheriff; John Hudspeth is David Coren will play a group of 
the juggler; Marion Crow and John violin solos. Joseph Mehalow will ac- 
Burke are the hobbyhorse. company and play a group of piano 

The queen, Mary Emma Yoder, has selections. 

as ladies of the court Lois Davis, Me- 1 

lissa Smoot, and Elizabeth Smith. 1941 LANTHORN READY 

Louise McWilliams is a gypsy, and FOR DISTRIBUTION 
Doris Welsh and Peggy Chamberlain 



reservations expire at four o'clock this 
afternoon. 

The Assembly Plant should prove 
both interesting and educational. The 
students will have the opportunity to 
see how locomotives and trains are as- 
sembled. The plant is now equipped 
for the manufacture of war tanks and 
materials which should be an added 
attraction because of its effect on the 
'present war situation. 

This plant was used in the making of 
war machines during the first World 
War. 

S 

RAINDROPS 



Six more concerts for the Motet Choir 
have been scheduled for the remainder 
of this year. The annual home concert i 
will be given next Sunday, April 28, in 
Trinity Lutheran Church in Selins- 
grove. The concert will be given at 2:30. 
That same day the choir will sing in , 
Lewistown at 8:00 p. m. 

Saturday afternoon, May 4, the Motet 
will leave for Williamsburg. They will 
sing there Saturday evening. Sunday.' 
they will give concerts in Somerset and 
in Johnstown. 

The Motet is also scheduled to sing 
in the chapel May 11, for Sub-Fresh- 
man Day. This is the last scheduled 
concert of the choir. 



Dean and Mrs. Russell Gait enter- 
tained the Proctors Committee of the 
men's dormitories, Friday afternoon 
from 4 to 6 at a tea in their home. 
Committee members present were Dr. 
Aaam Smith, faculty advisor, and Dean 
Gait, chairman. Student committee 
members were Fred Schmidt, Joseph 
Mehalow. Paul Shatto, and Harry 
Thatcher. 

The purpose of the meeting was to 
report on the work accomplished this 
year, and to lay plans for next year. 
The committee reported that they had 
received fine cooperation from the men 
in the dormitories and that they be- 
lieve next year will be even more suc- 
cessful than this year has been. 



(Continued from Page 3) 
Vernon Blough will also , som ething like: "Isn't it a lovely day 

I to be caught in the rain?" Karl seem- 
ed to agree pretty well. Bill Curry was 
also overheard in an attempt at croon- 
ing, but we'd better let Bill explain 
that!!! 

That ever-at-it wag, Shoe now as- 
serts that he is going to call his mother 
and express his birthday wishes for 
her by having the second floor of Has- 
singer sing "Happy Birthday" with or- 
chestra to her over the phone. Poor 
Mrs. Shoemaker! 

Suggestion to all or any visitors who 
may have been on campus over the 
week-end: See Mr. Yorty about a rain 
check and come back for May Day. 
We're hoping at least that "Blue Rain' 



are tumblers. (Continued from Page 1 

After the Procession comes the sec- be a series of action Pictures from the j won . t na ' ve to be used for the proces- 
ond part of the program— dances and footba11 P ast se a son - | sional. 



contests to amuse the court. There are 
six dances: a gypsy solo dance by 
Louise McWilliams. an archery drill. 
a Morris handkerchief dance, a scarf 
dance, and a maypole dance. The con- 
tests between the suitors for the May 
Queen's hand are four in number: 
Archery, racing, wrestling, and soccer. 
The May Day exercises are sponsor- 
ed by the Women's Athletic Association. 
S 

Hutchison Quotes from 
Tolstoy at Vespers 

Sunday evening vespers was conduct- 
ed by Helen Wright, leader; Jane 
Hutchison, speaker; and Alice Deiter- 
ick, organist. The theme of the ser- 
vice was "Live your life this day so 
that you may face death's approach 
serenely." 

The service was opened with the 
singing of "Blessing and Honor, and 
Glory and Power." followed by the 
reading of the Beatitudes, in which are 
set forth the promise of God's reward 
for our tasks well done. 

Jane told about the Russian relig- 
ious writer. Tolstoy, who as he was 
walking along in the country one day 
continually thought about "what he 
Would do il he knew tluit he should 
die within twenty-four hours. Some 
people would go to work to set them- 
selves aright witii God, though even 
on their deathbeds as did Constantine. 
and witli man; but that is not a com- 
mendable act for Christians, we. as 
Christians even in our ordinary way, 
should so live and work as Christians 
that we may be found on Judgment 
Daj on God's righl band. To live as 
Christians means to face many trials 
and disappointments; but we shall 
come to realise thai "The longest way 
around is the shortest wav home to 
God ' 

"Savior, Breathe an Evening Bless- 
ing'' was the closing livimi, after which 
Pi Smith pronounced the Benediction. 



The theme of the book will be 
"Doors" and will be incorporated es- 
pecially in the divider pages. 

The staffs responsible for the pro- 
duction of the 1941 Lanthom include: 

Editorial Staff: Paul C. Shatto, edi- 
tor-in-chief; Harry Thatcher. George 
H. Bantley. Philip W. Bergstresser, 
Mary Emma Yoder, Feme Poorbaugh, 
Martha Tribby. Willard Schadel, Karl 
Young, and Elsie Hochella. Dr. Arthur 
H. Wilson served as the faculty ad- 
visor. 

Business Staff: Florence Reitz. busi- 
ness manager; Lois Davis. Lois Beam- 
enderfer. and Harry Klepko. Prof. D. 
Irvin Reitz was the faculty advisor. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA staff wishes to 
congratulate the retiring staffs on the 
creation of a really new Lanthorn. 

The photographers for this year's 
publication were Breon and Stover of 
the Penn State Photo Shop, State Col- 
lege. Pa. The Grit Publishing Com- 
! pany, Williamsport. Pa., is the pub- 
lisher. 

S 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



Which brings us to McCord. They 
say it's a fact that he, slightly mixed 
up as usual, had for his song last 
week: "September in the Rain." 



From labor health, from health con- 
tentment springs.— Beattie. 



Rl ITrilim BARBER 
Allll O SHOP 



Sanitary Service 
ONE PRICE FOR 

Hair Cuts £L 



25c 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Wait 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
FREE 

Shoe Shine Parlor 

NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Full Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



The future is purchased by the pres- 
ent. — Johnson. 



BRESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthom 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



S.U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERTNG AND 

INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



I — 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL CAFE 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove. Pa. 



M C 



m 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 
Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses'— - 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCTENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TR-AINXNG 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL. PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pre*. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



f 



PROGRESS 

INSURANCE IN FORCE 
$676,500.00 

• in 1 -.im.oo 

$26,370,926.00 

$42,56M41.00 

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MINNEAPOLIS 



LEGAL RESERVE LIFE INSURANCE FOR LUTHERANS 



Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



VOIR INSURANCE 

does double duty for 
you! Provides a 
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your dependents in 
the event of your 
death; or, if you live 
to retirement age, 
gives you a monthly 
income for life. 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



All-Master Band Festival 

Tomorrow, Friday, and Saturday 
Susquehanna will play host to the fifth 
annual All-Master Band Festival. To 
all our guests we express the heartiest 
welcome! The program for the fes- 
tival is: 

Registration— Thursday, 2 p. m. 
Rehearsals during Thursday, Friday, 

and Saturday morning. 
Band clinic— Saturday, 1:45 p. m. 
Mass drill maneuvers — Saturday, 3:00 

p. m. 
Festival Concert— Saturday, 8:15 p. m. 
■ in the Alumni Gymnasium. 

Moravian Baseball Team Here 

Friday afternoon the Crusader 
moundmen take the field for the fifth 
game of the season against a reputedly 
strong Moravian nine. The record of 
the Pritchardites to date shows two 
losses and two victories. 

Tennis Team Meets Moravian 

Coach Stagg's netmen will seek the 
winning column Friday afternoon when 
they meet the Moravian racqueteers on 
the local courts. 

Pre-theologieal Club to Meet 

The Pre-theological Club will be the 
guests of Dr. and Mrs. T. W. Kretsch- 
mann on Friday evening at 7 p. m. At 
this meeting the installation of the 
newly-elected officers will take place. 

Juniata Track Team Here Saturday 

After suffering a setback at the 
hands of the Bucknell Bisons, the Sus- 
quehanna track team will meet its sec- 
ond foe of the season Saturday after- 
noon at 1 p. m., when it faces Juniata 
here. 

Pi Gamma Mu Banquet 

This national honorary social science 
fraternity will hold its annual banquet 
on Monday evening at 6:45 p. m. at 
the Governor Snyder Hotel. The meet- 
ing will be addressed by Rev. Edward 
Ullrich. 

Elizabethtown Teams Here 

Susquehanna will play host to the 
tennis and baseball teams from Eliza- 
bethtown College next Tuesday after- 
noon. 

Phi Kappa Meets Tuesday 

The Phi Kappa Greek club will meet 
next Tuesday evening in room 205 G. 
A. The officers for the coming year 
will be installed. 

Interclass Track Meet 

. The annual contest between the four 
classes to determine track and field 
supremacy will be held next Wednes- 
day afternoon. Coach Stagg hopes to 
discover additional varsity candidates 
through this meet. 



Pottsville Choir Repays 
Annual Visit of Motet 



This morning at 11 o'clock the Potts- 
ville High School choir of 112 voices 
under the direction of Earl W. Havi- 
land gave a concert in the chapel be- 
fore the student body. 

This was the choir's third annual 
visit to the campus and after the con- 
cert they were the guests of the Uni- 
versity at luncheon and during the 
afternoon. 

Several weeks ago the University's 
own Motet Choir gave a concert in the 
Pottsville High School and the girls of 
Motet sang with the Pottsville choir. 
This proved very successful and was 
on the program again. 

Last year a very effective Verse Choir 
also gave a few selections. This was 
a very unique and interesting idea and 
today the Verse Choir made is second 
appearance on our campus. 



Players Will Organize 
DramaticsHonorSociety 

A list of those actors who have ful- 
filled the requirements for an honorary 
dramatic club is now in preparation, 
Mr. James C. Freeman, faculty advisor 
for the Theatre Guild has announced. 

The requirements are identical with 
those for the national dramatic fra- 
ternity, Alpha Psi Omega, with which 
the local group hopes to be affiliated 
eventually. 

The requirements include an acting 
major role (70 lines or speeches) in 
one long play or service as stage man- 
ager, technical director, or business 
manager for two long plays. Minor 
roles and work on technical commit- 
tees count toward proportionate mem- 
bership. 

As soon as the data is accumulated, 
some time in the next two weeks, the 
club will be organized if the members 
of this "honor role" so desire. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXAAvii. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

»LLINs>(;KOYE. PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1940 



Number :) 



Luminaries of the Fifth Annual All-Master Band Festival 




New S. C. A. Cabinet 
Members Elected 



Elaine Miller is Grand President; 
Heaton and Reitz Are Respectively 
Boys' and Girls' Presidents 



£LR0Se UffLJJSOhl 

\F£.stiMl Conductor) 



FRANK SIMON AND LEONA MAY SMITH TO APPEAR HERE; 
SUSQUEHANNA TO PLAY HOST TO HIGH SCHOOL MUSICIANS 



Dr. Gait Announces 
Latest Honor Roll 



Band Festival to Begin 
Tomorrow; to Feature 
Mass Drills and Concert 



S. U. Studies Ready 
For Distribution 



i 



—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



Dean's list for the period ending 
April 6, 1940. This list becomes effec- 
tive April 29th. 1940. This cancels the 
previous dean's list, and all students 
who have dropped off lose their free 
cutting privileges beginning Monday, 
April 29th. 

Dorothy Artz 

Donald Billman 

Warren Bonawitz 

Marion Boyer 

David Coren 

Mary Christine Fox 

Lois Davis 

John Drumheller 

Katherine Dietterle 

Marie Edlund 

Mildred Follmer 

Jeanne Fenner 

Robert Fisher 

Grace Fries 

Margaret Grenoble 

Nancy Griesemer 

Melvin Haas 

Elsie Hochella 

Mary Lee Krumbholtz 

Ferae Lauver 

William Mease 

Glenn Musser 

Joseph Pasterchik 

Jean Penman 

Anna Reeder 

Edward Rogers 

Florence Rothermel 

Fred Schmidt 

Paul Shatto 

Dorothy Shutt 

Harry Thatcher 

Harry Wilcox 

Evelyn Williamson 

Eugene Williams 

Michael F. Wolf 

Marjorie Wolfe 

When announcing this list in chapel 
Monday morning. Dean Gait explained 
that this list includes the upper ten 
per cent of the student body instead of 
including those students whose aver- 
age was 2.05 or above as was done last 
semester. 

When quest ioned about the motive 
for changing the method of determin- 
ing the Dean's List, the dean stated 
that he had been experimenting with 
various methods of arriving at dean's 
lists and that no permanent method 
had been decided upon as yet. 

He explained fun her by laying t hat ■ 
facultj la Inclined to grade in cycles. 
Issuing mere high grades at one time 
than knottier, This makes it almost 
impossible sonic* imes to use a certain, 
arbitrary BCholMtk avenv • | ■ de- 
termining factor; this fluctuation can 
(Continued on Page 4> 



Tomorrow. Thursday afternoon, will 
mark the arrival of some 150 hand- 
picked musicians from forty Central 
Pennsylvania high schools who will be 
on the campus May 2. 3. and 4, during 
which time they will rehearse and ap- 
pear as the young stars of the fifth 
annual All-Master Band Festival of 
this region. The annual band festival, 
sponsored by Susquehanna University, 
has become one of the outstanding 
events of its kind in the East and will 
attract thousands of music lovers to 
our campus for its drill clinic, massed 
band concert, and the festival concert. 
Dr. Frank Simon, conductor of the 
Armco Band and internationally fam- 
ous bandmaster, will be the guest con- 
ductor for the festival. Besides. Dr. 
Simon is the director of the band de- 
partment of the Cincinnati Conserva- 
tory of Music, and is also, well known 
as concert soloist. His superb artistry 
won him an enviable reputation as cor- 
net soloist with the great John Philip 
Sousa Band. He left the Sousa Band 
in 1921 to organize his own band under 
the sponsorship of the American Roll- 
ing Mill Company and millions have 
since listened to his famous Armco 
Band over the networks of the Na- 
' tional Broadcasting Company. 

Dv. Simon, in addition to conducting 
i he festival concert on Saturday even- 
• ing, will hold a discussion at the band 
' clinic on "Simonizing the Concert 
Band." During the band drill maneu- 
vers, he will direct a massed band of 
some 400 pieces in the playing of his 
most famous composition, "Cincinnati 
Post March." 

The guest soloist for the festival con- 
cert will be Miss Leona May Smith, 
America's premier cornet soloist. Miss 
Smith has appeared with the Goldman 
Band, Fred Waring and his "Pennsyl- 
vanians," and at Radio City Music Hall 
under the direction of Erno Rapee. 
She has been hailed by critics as being 
not only the greatest woman cornetist, 
but has been unquestionably conceded 
to be one of t lie greatest soloists of this 
generation. She will speak at the band 
clinic about "Efficient Playing of the 
. Cornet." 

Elrose L. Allison. Susquehanna's band 
director and conductor of the All-Mas- 
ter High School Band Festival, has an- 
nounced the following schedule: 

Registration Thursday afternoon at 
two. 
Section rehearsals at three 

Ensemble rehearsals Thursday even- 
ing. 
Smith rehearses with band Friday 
i Continued on Page 4) 



Fifth Issue of Faculty Publication 
Completed; Gait, Lawson, Russ, Os- 
terbind, and Wilson Contribute 



Dr. Arthur H. Wilson has announced 
that the latest issue of the Susque- 

i hanna University Studies is off the 
press and ready for distribution. Copies 
may be secured at the book store or 
from Dr. Wilson for the expense-de- 

[ fraying sum of twenty-five cents per 

| copy. 

Susquhanna University Studies is an 
j annual publication made up of articles 
I concerning research projects carried 
' on by various members of the faculty. 
! This issue, a forty page work, contains 

articles by: Dean Russell Gait, Dr. Eric 

W. Lawson, Dr. William A. Russ, Mr. 

Carter C. Osterbind, and Dr. Arthur 

H. Wilson. 

The appearance of this number of the 
'■ Studies is especially significant in that 
it marks the completion of the first 
J volume of the publication. According 
1 to Dr. Wilson, the publication of these 
! research findings was made possible 
by Dr. G. Morris Smith five years ago. 
Along with five research articles, this 
number contains also the academic 
records of all contributors to the five 
numbers of volume one. All in all. 
eighteen writers who are or have been 
members of the local faculty have con- 
tributed to the Studies; Dr. Wilson ex- 
pressed great pleasure at their success 
! at getting contributions from a wide 
representation among the faculty. The 
articles published in the first five num- 
bers have varied from ancient history 
to Shakespeare to modern poetry to the 
i latest industrial and historical facts. 
The Susquehanna University Studies 
is published by an editorial board of 
four members: Dr. Arthur H. Wilson, 
'chairman; Dr. G. Morris Smith, Dr. 
George E. Fisher, and Dr. William A. 
Russ, Jr. 

This issue contains the following five 
articles, including first Dean Russell 
! Gait's findings concerning the prac- 
tices followed by twenty Pennsylvania 
colleges in tiie supervision of men's 
dormitories. This article outlines the 
various methods used a' different coi- 
SUmmariSf merits and 

fault- found in each, and tells of the 
new experiment made by Susquehanna 
during the pasl 

The second sectlo ted to a 

discussion ol re rulation of the policy of 

commercial banks In the United States 

v. by Dr. Erie W. Lawson, Dr. 

• ipecially with the 

(Continued on Page 4> 



Elaine Miller was elected grand 
president of the S. C A. for the com- 
ing year Monday afternoon by the new 
cabinet. Blair Heaton was elected boys, 
president and Florence Reitz, girls' 
president. These three officers com- 
pose the executive committee. Other 
officers are Harold Mitman— treasurer, 
Evelyn Williamson — recording secre- 
tary, and Mary Emma Yoder— corres- 
ponding secretary. 

The remaining members of the new 
cabinet and their respective positions 
are : Paul Shoemaker and Cornelia 
Grothe, co-chairmen of Freshman ac- 
tivities; Martin Hopkins, world fellow- 
ship; Harry Hhatcher, handbook; For- 
rest Heckert. membership chairman; 
Merle Hoover, student church; Miriam 
Unangst, vespers; Kathe Hansen, 
chapel; and Jack Walsh, social chair- 
man. This new cabinet was elected by 
the members of the Student Christian 
Association Friday morning after chap- 
el. The date for installation has not 
been definitely decided but the service 
will take place during the coming week 
The president of this year's cabinet 
was Robert Sander. His assistants were 
George Brosius and Elaine Miller. The 
other members of the cabinet were Ethel 
Straesser, Helen Wright, Harry Thatch- 
er, George Bantley, John Gensel, Leon 
Haines, Jeanne Fenner, Martin Hop- 
kins, Elizabeth Albury, Mary Lee 
Krumbholz, and Dorothy Shutt. 
Miss Miller is the second girl to be 

' grand president of the S. C. A. The 
first president was a girl when it was 
organized in 1934. Miss Miller has been 

; an active member of the Association 
since her freshman year and has been 
a member of the cabinet for two years 
She held the office of girls' president 
this year. The student body feels that 
she is quite capable of such a position 
and is ready to give her its full support 
After her election Miss Miller said: 
"I will do everything I can to make 
the S. C. A. a fine organization during 
the next year, and I am sure with the 
cooperation of a fine cabinet and the 
student body that we can promote more 
student fellowship, higher ideals, and 
the many more aims for which the Stu- 
dent Christian Association stands." 



To Appear In Play 




Mysterious English 
Lord to Head Drama 



"Criminal at Large" Staffs Begin In- 
tensive Work in Preparation for First 
Showing on May 17 



"Criminal at Large" tells the story of 

murder in an English country home 

It i.-, one of the plays for Which the 

. ih are famous quiet, suspense- 

ful murder. 

The cast for the Susquehanna 
Theatre Guild's "Criminal al La 
Edgar Wallace's play of murder 
mysterj enters this week the final 
stretch of intensive practice before the 
first presentation, which will be given 
May it m Belberi Hall. 

Thi : "Criminal at Large" In- 

cludes Forrest Heckert, shown above, 

Paul Shatto. Louise McWilh 
(Continued on Page ;i> 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1940 






THE SUSQUEHANNA Traditional May Day Celebration 

Features Bucolic English Village 



Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by 



the Post Office Department. 



Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 



THE STAFF 



May Day is a day of tradition and 
custom. Every year people repeat over 
again the things which they and their 
ancestors have done for ages. Those 
afflicted with freckles wash their faces 
in the early morning May dew. School 
children weave baskets of multicolored 
paper, fill them with wild flowers, and 
hang them at someone's door. But 
Susquehanna's tradition is to have a 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Forrest Heckert genuine May Day celebration abound 

G. Rob- ing in lovely creatures, both male and 



Managing Editor 

Reporters: Margaret Grenoble, '40; Anne Hill. '40; Virginia Mann. '40 

ert Booth, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; 
Eleanor Smith, '41; Ruth Specht. '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; Blair Heaton, '42; 
Ruth Schwenk, '42; Willard Sterrett, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor- 
yell, '43; Marv Cox, *43; Ella Fetherolf, '43; Charles Gundrum, '43; Dan 
MacCartney, '43; Harrv Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson, '43. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Advertising Manager Paul Shoemaker 

Business Assistants: Delphine Hoover, Robert MacQuesten, Stanley Stonesifer, 

Rex Sunday, Frank Morgan, Dorothy Weder, Frank Corcoran. 
Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. P. I. Reitz. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1940 



female, fitting about as inhabitants of 
another world and another time. And 
then too, there is the "piece de resis- 
tance," the coronation of Her Royal 
Majesty, Queen of the May, in honor 
of whom all the festivities are held. 

This year, the other world is England, 
as last year it was the land of Peter 
Pan. We shall be taken to the ancient 



May Day festival of a bucolic English 
village and treated not only to the 
sight of royalty, but also to the enter- 
tainments of royalty— minstrelsy, jugg- 
ling, tumbling, horse-play, dancing, 
archery, and a jester, fully the peer of 
Shakespeare's "motley fool." Likewise, 
we shall see four stalwart suitors vying 
for the hand of ye faire ladye. I Suit- 
ors that actively go after their true 
love; not the sort that languish in 
secret, wishing silently, "Wouldst that 
I might kiss thy hand," or some similar 
tripe.) 

All this not without effort. It takes 
work— mental and physical. The pag- 
eant must be conceived, written, and 
acted— even at the expense of an ankle, 
if necessary. Laud and honor to all 
those who make May Day at Susque- 
hanna what it is, a glorious tradition. 



WELCOME MUSICIANS! 

Tomorrow afternoon the delegations of students and in- 
structors from high schools throughout this section Of the State it isn't fair. One week the weather 
will arrive for the fifth annual All-Master Band Festival. Over is so rainy that one isn't in the humor 

win cm w.««^«-j _...i*4.«. fl to do anything and the next week it's 

the three-day festival period more than two hundred musicians so nice that everyone gets spring feve r. 

are expected to visit the campus, each of them chosen because Ne t result: same. 

of outstanding merit as a director or as a player of his respec- Golf, however, took an upswing in 

° ..... , ■„ „. u 1tt popularity as a result of the spring 

tive instrument. In addition, many music lovers will piobably weather Naylor and shaef and Loi ey 
attend the mass drills on Saturday afternoon and the grand and critch comprised one foursome 
concert on Saturday evening. To all these guests Susquehanna £"££ %?%£%££>£ 
University extends the heartiest welcome. splrit of tnings and went camping. 

The Staff Of THE SUSQUEHANNA lauds the accomplish- Others hiked Selinsgrove and vicinity 

ments of the band festivals of former years and extends the ^£~ ^X^f^ 

hope that this one may set a new height to achievement. For- Pe0 pie on the stands seemed to think 

mer festivals have brought together those student musicians that he would have got even more ex- 

from more than thirty surrounding schools whom their instruc- g^£ ZT^TJZS!; 

tors have picked as having outstanding ability. To supervise the his stride eve n a little bit. 

instructing of these musicians, high school instructors have Bill Nye celebrated the coming of 

been invited from all sections of the state. Each year a band j^*^ 'SSMSE 

director of national fame has been brought to the festival to sophical, the cast would have missed 

crvstalize the work of the individual instructors. This year we Joe Baxter's little stunt wherein he 

J , . „ . . , , , , . K a_ _.* nr . a Hllf took his own and Bill's part with quite 

have been especially fortunate to be able to book not one but interesting resultK if Bill had not slep t 

two nationally known figures for the festival. With such figures through-as he says. 

as Frank Simon and Leona May Smith in attendance this year's Back together again <and stale news 

. , , ,, , ., . at that) are Chuck and June. Itisnt 

festival should surpass those of the past. a direct result of course but Cnucki 

We feel that no little praise for the SUCCeSS Of these music poor boy, has taken to hearing things. 

treats should go to the officials of the university and especially J-j^jj^.J-gJ-fyg 

of the Conservatory for their untiring efforts to improve the it was a pasS i ng pedestrian who had 

festival. said - " Hell °" BiU Curry, too, has been 



"TO MUSE OR AMUSE" 



that. We're wondering. Bill— who? 



On behalf of those in charge of arranging the festival 

schedule, we wish to ask the whole-hearted cooperation of both with nice wea ther comes the padd- 

students and faculty members in regard to any interruptions ling season. Early signs were boys in- 

of college classes which may occur. The large number of mu- ^S^"Si^SSTZ 

sicians in attendance and the short time allowed for the mas- Ferne Aren tz*s door had a little note 

tery of the concert music does make it necessary for some re- on display lately. To quote: "Gone 

hearsals to be held during class hours, but every effort will be ££? XSmLSlZSZ* 



rate, for fear of missing too many I 
shall merely report to those who 
weren't on campus and consequently 
may think that they missed something: 
practically everyone else was away, too. 
If you doubt my words see Shusta and 
he will tell you all about his "only 
thirteen tables." Grrr. 

Methods for staying awake in class 
on a nice spring day are always help- 
ful. Hence, may we suggest the fol- 
lowing: First, arrive to class just a 
little late. Not only does that give 
less time in which to fall asleep but 
also it sometimes has a sharpening 
effect on the teacher's tongue which 
serves to keep one awake a little long- 
er. A good start has been made by this 
time. Then the simpler methods may 
be tried: looking out the window at 
the lovely birds, flowers, and things, 
and drawing pictures. In mild cases 
these will serve to keep the sufferer 
awake until his next class. In more 
obstinate cases stronger methods must 
be used. For instance, there are dif- 
ficult additions which may be worked 
on— mentally, of course— with an at- 
tempt at such concentration that the 
figurer cannot fall asleep. Such things 
as adding up the number of one's 
chapel cuts and dividing the total by 
three, totaling one's class cuts, and 
translating the whole into one-fifth of 
a credit may prove diverting for one 
period. In fact that can turn out with 
hearing things— and over the phone at a scaring effect, too. Poetry may be 



PREVIEWS .... 

Wednesday and Thursday, 
May 1 and 2 

Warner Brothers' production, VIR- 
GINIA CITY is a yarn of the closing 
days of the Civil War, with Errol Flynn, 
Miriam Hopkins, and Randolph Scott 
heading a stellar cast of topflight movie 
stars. The picture supposedly having 
its basis in historic fact, pictures rich 
pioneers of rowdy Virginia City, sym- 
pathizers with the Confederacy, trying 
to ship over five million dollars in gold 
ingots to Richmond by covered wagon 
caravan to help the lost cause of the 
South. On one side is a dashing Union 
intelligence officer, lately escaped from 
Libby Prison, who is sent to thwart the 
plot. On the other is a reckless Con- 
federate office, bent upon getting the 
gold convoy through. The pretty pawn 
is a Dixie girl, ardent Southern sym- 
pathizer dancing in the notorious Saz- 
erac Cafe in order that she can pick 
up information and sway opinion. In 
no time she's torn between love and 
duty. Errol Flynn makes the Irish- 
born Yankee officer handsome and 
debonair, while Randolph is stalwart 
and resolute as the Confederate. Mir- 
iam Hopkins' heroine is more intelli- 
gent than the pattern usually calls for, 
and for good measure there is Humph- 
rey Bogart as the bad man of the 
Southwest. 

Friday and Saturday, May 3 and 4 

Walt Disney's second full-length car- 
toon feature, PINOCCHIO, reaches the 
local theatre after enjoying a highly 
successful run wherever it has played. 
The delightful fantasy of an old old 
story is beautifully done with all of the 
magnificence and splendor that Holly- 
wood studios could possibly create. The 
creative genius which is Disney's has 
called forth a host of unique and fasci- 
nating imaginative characters which 
include Geppheto, Pinocchio, Con- 
science, the cot and the goldfish. It's 
a picture for everyone to see — don't 
miss seeing it! 

S 

The New Bride' Pleases 
Audience at Varities 

THE NEW BRIDE 



o'clock see June Jerore. She would be 
able to furnish helpful and successful 
methods by now. 
It would take a Winchell to give a 



made to reduce the amount of interruption to a minimum. 

S 

CONGRATULATIONS, WRITERS ! 

With the issuing of the fifth number of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity Studies, Susquehanna marks another milepost in liter- complete resume of all the trips away 
ary achievement. The five faculty members whose works make *SSttJE*<2££tt. 
up this number of the Studies, and indeed all those who have ces sfui. (That's consoling.) At any 

contributed to the series since it began, are to be congratulated 

for a fine piece of work. 

A publication such as this is valuable in many ways, but 
greatest of all its use is to bring before the public, students and 
otherwise, the original works being carried on by the college 
faculty. Let us consider this number as an example. Dean 
Gait's findings about dormitory regulation among Pennsylvania 
colleges might never have been presented to any reading public 
in a concise, readable outline form had it not been for this or- 



written if appropriate inspiration can 
be found, and it usually can in the 
spring. If all these have no effect 
then we offer the cure to be used when 
all else fails: Prepare the lesson so 
well that your recitation will take the 
greater part of the period. This will 
serve to keep not only you awake but 
would probably perform a good turn 



The Men's Music Guild and S. A. I. 
combined their talents last Thursday 
night to give a Campus Variety Show 
at 8:15 in Seibert chapel before an ap- 
preciative audience of students, faculty 
and friends. 

The one-act farce, "The New Bride," 
featured Clyde Sechler as Ashley Barr, 
who in an effort to evade officers of the 
law dons feminine attire. Nancy 
Griesemer was outstanding for her 
portrayal of Betty Byewater, an anti- 
quated newspaperwoman. 

Members of the cast were: 

James Vaughan Karl Young 

Pudge, his new bride . .Blanche Forney 

Ashley Barr Clyde Sechler 

Helen Vaughan Elizabeth Walters 



your sleepy roommate up for an eight for the rest of the class— keep them Betty Byewater Nancy Griesemer 



awake from surprise. 

Economics students in the last few 
days have been making comments 
which lead me to think that perhaps 
Dr. Lawson has some information 
which might prove interesting to the 
campus at large. We'll see if he will 
talk for next week's column!! 



"THE CAMPUS C.OI.TC" 



Well, at long last the spring has fin- 
ally put in its appearance judging by 
the activity upon the campus. Ac- 
tivity of strolling people under a mel- 
low moon and soft whispered nothings 
as shadows merge. For all informa- 
gan; publishd, it will probably serve to explain to the students tion on this sub ject, i refer you to my 

here the present day trend in other colleges and to serve as a expert in the line of love, romance, and happened to meet 

beacon to guide administrators in other institutions. and women, in the form of George 

But there is another very important aspect to the point Bantiey whom coach dubbed the heart 
to be considered. A college is judged in many circles by the ' 
research work done by its faculty. Of course, a small college is 
limited in this respect since it cannot finance extensive projects 
by its faculty members. Susquehanna fortunately, is manned 
by a faculty in which there is much talent and ability along 
research lines. Susquehanna University Studies is intended 
to encourage our faculty to engage in such works, insuring them wha t else is he? 

that their findings Will be published. Here, may I insert a paid advertise- 

THE SUSQUEHANNA staff wishes to express great sym- ment ™e waxer of a11 wax !f is J" 
^ _ _ , * „, ,. need of more cars to wax. The jobs 

pathy toward the publication of Susquehanna University Studies are guaranteed t0 nold up as i ong as 
and congratulations to all who have been a part of this organ the car remains in the garage, m 

: thn nast case anvone wishes to have his car 

in ur pdhu. waxed tQ the Jnt of brlUiancy> S ee 

The staff also wishes to urge the student to take advantage Happy the Cork 
of the opportunities which this publication offers. In the past, Bv the waVi spe aking of the cork, i 
there has been little interest shown by students toward these think i ought to warn him that Jay 
issues, but we feel that every student and faculty member should *"2£&V t0 " , £lS£ «&•% 
read the results of these researches by our faculty members. Happy is good for is playing Redcap. 
Most schools the size of Susquehanna have no such production can you imagine what i saw sun- 
in which the capabilities of the faculty members can be dis- day night? well, in tell you There 

, ,, , , , . he was, all alone, just pining his heart 

played, and the least we as students can do to show our appre- out Mendy had gone home It was 
ciation is to secure a copy and read it. sort of pleasant to see him by himself 



He is sorry- 
he didn't play Georgie against the girl 
at Dickinson. He believes that by his 
attraction he might have won. 

Schuck claims that after being beat- 
en by the girl at Dickinson, he is go- 
ing to turn driver for the tennis team. 



for once. 

Speaking of people being alone it 
seems that Hook (Popeye) and Nye 
were "stood up" on Sunday night. It 
also seems that Alias and Coincidence 
were also "stood up." Both of the 
couples came down town for a coke 

When they 
met they both had all kinds of ex- 
cuses. Why didn't they tell each other 
they didn't want dates. 

I didn't see it but they tell me that 
John pulled a Casey at the bat. Of 
course, that is only natural. It isn't 
the first time that he has struck out 
with bases loaded. 

MacCartney goes for a visit. Smith 
goes out. Walsh and MacCartney sev- 
er relations. A duel is next week. Cof- 
fee and pistols at ten. 

Heaton also seems to be doing all 
right. Grothe and he make a nice 
couple. 

As a preview of coming attractions of 
all coming attractions, let me intro- 
duce you to Mr. Albert Knapp. It 
seems that at long last he is giving 
the girls a break, for the commence- 
ment dance. But, sorry Seibert, he is 
bringing his most loved from home. 
Why not ask him for an explanation 
and the how and why of the matter. 

As a last word, will someone ask 
Knober to please wear a hat. The 
other fellows are bad, but his haircut? 
Yours truly. 



Edward Tait John Burke 

Officer O'Toole Walter Freed 

Fanchette Ruth Schwenk 

Officer Fogarty Edison James 

Preceding the play, Miss Louise Mc- 
Williams, "noted vocal instructor," en- 
tertained her students at a party. As 
the various students entered each had 
some part to contribute to the enter- 
tainment. The Crusaders Quartet — 
Donald Billman, Melvin Jones, Clyde 
Sechler, and Karl Young— sang "I Had 
a Dream," and "Annie Laurie." David 
Coren played a violin solo, the most 
artistic feature of the program, "Le- 
gende," by Wieniawski. He was ac- 
companied by Joe Mehalow at the 
piano. 

With an impersonation of a singer 
with amusing gestures and voice, Betty 
Malone brought a highly humorous 
note to the program in her rendition of 
"You Are My Lucky Star." Doris 
Welch, Louise McWilliams, and Dot 
Holmes sang a swing trio, "Through 
the Starry Night." 

Peg Grenoble played "Dark Eyes" on 
the concertina; Sechler played a banjo 
selection and Peg, accompanied by 
Clyde at the piano played "Bei Mir 
Bist Du Schoen." The party broke up 
after a duet, "Sweethearts," by John 
Burke and Eleanor Lyons. 
S 



Get Your Prom 
Tickets Now! 



All members of the Junior Class 
are to secure their tickets for the 
Junior Prom this week if possible. 
The girls' tickets are in the hands 
of Elaine Miller; the men's tickets 
have been divided according to fra- 
ternities and may be secured from 
Karl Young, Phi Mu Delta; Donald 
Ford, Bond and Key; and Harry 
Thatcher, Beta Kappa. Tickets for 
non-classmen may also be purchas- 
ed from any one of the above-men- 
tioned persons. 



: — 









WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<».- 



-<s>- 



DREXEL TECH HANDS PRITCHARDITES 
SECOND DEFEAT OF SEASON BY 5-4 



tt 



RANDOM SPORTS" 



Krouse Holds Strong Tech Team to Seven Hits in 
Philadelphia Fray; Zeravica Leads Batting At- 
tack; Zubac Injured 






Monday the Crusader baseball team 
journeyed to Philadelphia and suffer- 
ed a stinging defeat at the hands of a 
strong Drexel Tech team by a 5-4 
score. The defeat was the second 
straight for the locals in as many 
starts. 

The Susquehanna nine took the lead 
in the first inning by scoring two runs 
with two men out. Ford singled, stole 
second, and advanced to third when 
Kaltreider's infield grounder was muf- 
fed. Kaltreider then stole second and 
both men crossed the platter on Steve 
Zeravica's single to centerfleld. Drexel 
scored single tallies in the second and 
third innings by using the squeeze play 
method to tie the count. The home 
team went into the lead in the third 
with two runs which scored as a re- 
sult of a two base hit by Styres, a 
single and a misjudged fly ball. Furth- 
er score was avoided by a double play. 

The Crusaders tallied another run 
in the sixth inning when Ford dropped 
a single into left, stole second and 
scored on Kaltreider's single. In this 
same inning the locals had the bases 
loaded with one out but Schleig and 
Lewis failed in coming through with 
safe blows. The Pritchardites scored 
another tally in the eighth when Zu- 
back walked, and after Ford and Kalt- 
reider went out on infield bouncers, 
Steve Zeravica brought Zuback across 
with a double to right field. 

In the ninth inning after Zavarich 
and Gensel had gone out, Isaacs doubl- 
ed into the left field stands, Zuback 
then walked but was picked off first 
base after the first pitch. Zuback 
wrenched his knee when he turned to 
retreat to the base, the injury being a 
recurrence of the same type which kept 
him on the sidelines for some time 
during last football season. 

Lefty Krouse gave but seven hits 
during his nine inning tenure but 
Drexel touched Susquehanna's ace for 
hits when they were needed. Steve 
Zeravica led the locals' hitting attack, 
getting three bingles, including a 
double. Kaltreider and Ford had two 
hits to the credit. 

Box score: 

Susquehanna AB R H O A 

Isaacs, 3b 5 1 1 2 

Zuback, cf 4 1 1 1 

Ford, 2b 4 2 2 3 7 

Kaltreider, ss 3 1 1 1 2 

Zeravica, c 4 3 3 

Schleig, rf 4 1 

Lewis, lb 4 12 

Zavarich. If 4 2 

Krouse, p 3 1 3 

Gensel (a) 1 



S. U. Cindermen Drop 
Opener to Bucknell 



Strong Bison Team Outclasses Locals 
On Local Track; MacQuesten, Warn- 
er, and Heaton Win 






Totals 36 4 9 24 14 

(a) Batted for Krouse in ninth. 
Drexel AB R H O A 

Halas, 2b 5 1 4 

Kolb, 3b 4 1 1 1 2 

Derdorf, lb 3 14 

Di Larso, If 3 1 1 3 

Styres, rf 4 1 1 1 

Clyde, c 4 1 6 2 

Quinn, cf 4 1 1 2 

Landis, ss 3 1 1 4 

Vandergrift, p 2 1 

Susquehanna ....20000101 0—4 
Drexel 01120010 x— 5 

Errors — Landis 2, Isaacs 2, Krouse 1. 

Two base hits — Styres, Zeravica, 
Isaacs. 
Stolen bases — Ford 2, Zeravica, Landis. 

Sacrifices — Derdorf, Vandergrift 2, 
Kolb. 

Left on bases — Drexel 9, Susque- 
hanna 7. 

Double play— Ford to Lewis. 

Base on balls — off Krouse 2, Van- 
dergrift 2. 

Struck out — by Krouse 1, by Van- 
dergrift 6. 

Losing pitcher— Krouse. 

Umpire— Gibbs. 

S 

MYSTERIOUS ENGLISH 
LORD TO HEAD DRAMA 



Last Wednesday afternoon the Cru- 
sader track and field men opened their 
seven meet season against the Buck- 
nell Bisons on the home track. The 
locals evidenced a stronger team than 
last year but were not in good condi- 
tion, probably because the cold weather 
has interrupted outdoor workouts. The 
meet ended with Bucknell on the strong 
end by a count of 34-92. 

Two points of strength were espe- 
cially obvious on the local team — the 
mile run and the high jump. Robert 
MacQuesten, ace miler, got off to a 
good start this season by completely 
outclassing the Bucknell field; at no 
time in the entire race did a Bucknell 
man succeed in coming close to the 
Susquehanna entry. In the high jump, 
Fred Warner and Blair Heaton com- 
promised with a tie at 5'10"; this like- 
wise was not equalled by our oppon- 
ents. 

Another thrilling point in the meet 
J came when Pritchard and Thomas fin- 
i ished the 120-yd. high hurdles at al- 
most a dead heat; the decision declared 
Thomas winner by a nose. 

Burt Richards and Bill Pritchard 
were high scorers for the Susquehanna 
team each garnering two second places 

This Saturday the Staggmen take 
their marks against a strong Juniata 
i team on the local track at 1 p. m. Jun- 
iala won the triangular meet against 
Susquehanna and Moravian last year, 
and it is expected that the Juniata 
runners will offer stiff competition. 

The summary of the events in the 
Bucknell-Susquehanna meet is as fol- 
lows: 

Mile Run— Won by MacQuesten <S>; 
second, Snyder <B); third, Schnure 
(B). Time— 5:08. 

440-yd. Run— Won by Shaffer <B); 
second, Shusta <S); third, Curry <S). 
Time— 54.8. 

110-yd. Dash— Won by Armour (B); 
second, Culp <B); third, Pritchard (S). 
Time— 10.1. 

120-yd. High Hurdles — Won by 
Thomas <B); second, Pritchard <S); 
third, Meyers <S). Time— 17.0. 

880-yd. Run— Won by Eshelman <B); 
second, Shaffer (B); third, Snyder <B). 
Time— 2:14.3. 

220-yd Dash— Won by Armour iB); 
second, Culp <B); third, Deardorf (S). 
Time— 22.7. 

2-Mile Run— Won by Moore <B); 
second, Peters (B); third, Biddle <B). 
Time— 11:29.5. 

220-yd Low Hurdles— Won by Thom- 
as iB); second, Pritchard <S); third, 
Bender <B). Time— 22.7 

Pole Vault — Won by Cannestro (B); 
second, Ward <B>; third, Learn <S) and 
Herman (S) tie. Height— 10'6". 

High Jump — Won by Warner <S) and 
Heaton (S) tie; third, Anderson <B> 
and Shaffer <B>. Height— 5'10". 

Shot Put— Won by Serrao <B>; sec- 
ond, Pocius (B); third, Woods (B). 
Distance— 39'11". 

Discus — Won by Pocius (B); second, 
Sarrao <B>; third. Woods <B>. Dis- 
tance— 123' 9". 

Broad Jump— Won by Thomas <Bi; 
second, Richards »S>; third, Weinburg 
(B). Distance— 20'10'.". 

Javelin — Won by Thomas <B>; sec- 
ond, Richards <S>; third, Warner (I), 
Distance— 168'5". 

Final score: Susquehanna 34; Buck- 
nell 92. 



Last week seemed to be the downfall 
of the spring sports for Susquehanna. 
Tennis, track, and baseball teams suf- 
fered at the hands of their opponents. 
The tennis team losing to Dickinson 
and Juniata, the baseball team suffer- 
ing at home by losing to Juniata, and 
the junior varsity track squad traveled 
to Carson Long to be tamped by their 
runners. 

Some interesting incidents noticed 
were: the beautiful relief pitching of 
John Gensel after six runs had cross- 
ed the plate in the first inning of the 
game. He came through to retire the 
side permitting the team to score only 
one more run. Later in the game the 
whole team rallied to make the game 
a thriller but last year's jinx popped 
up and the rally fell short by two runs. 
— At Carson Long some new prospects 
were uncovered. George Herman won 
the high jump at five feet five inches. 
He displayed good form and with a 
little practice he should make a good 
man to help Warner and Heaton in 
the varsity meets. — Templin came 
through to win both the shot and the 
discus, and not far behind was Lou 
Baylor. This is the most promising 
outlook for the track team, for all it 
needs is one or two good men in the 
weights.— One thing we can say for 
the runners of Susquehanna they show- 
: ed the real Crusader spirit, for many 
i teams would have given up after one 



Halts Juniata Drive 



look at the track at Carson Long. It j 
reminded me more of a country road 
than a place to run off a track meet. — 
Bill Curry was so exhausted at the end 
of the four-forty that he fainted. If 
everyone put that much into a race it 
wouldn't be long before some world 
records would fall. — Back to baseball 
we found that Johnny Zuback con- 
tinued to hit like a big leaguer. If he 
keeps up at that pace he will have one 
of those .400 averages. 

FAMILIAR FIGURES 

The next time you go to a ball game 
look for the little old man who sits 
on the right side of the bleachers about 
three rows up. He is one of our most 
ardent followers in both football and 
baseball. The home games are bright- 
ened by his remarks as the batters 
stand there, confused by Gensel's side 
arm pitching. If you can't find this 
little fellow, look out along the third 
base line for a large men in a gray 
suit. He stands out there and heckles 
the opposition's third baseman. He 
usually has a cigar in his hand and a 
smile on his face. 

strand 

THEATRE 

sunbury 




Juniata Indians Top 
Crusader Moundmen 



First and Fifth Inning Drives Win 
For Visitors; Gensel Stops Juniata 
Heyday 



After getting a lead of six runs in 
the first inning and four in the fifth, 
the Juniata Indians handed the Sus- 
quehanna Crusaders their first defeat 
on the home diamond by a 14 to 12 
score. 

i Krouse, swept off the mound in the 
j first inning after he had given the In- 
! dians tnree hits and 6 runs, was re- 
i placed by Johnnie Gensel, who slowed 
down the opposition to a snail's pace 
j until the fifth inning when the visitors 
; gathered four runs; their last attack 
of the game. 

Opening up in the last two innings j 
j to accumulate six runs, the Crusaders ; 
I were unable to overcome the Indians' 
first and fifth inning advances. 

The lineup: 
Susquehanna AB R H A E 

: Isaacs, 3b 6 1 3 1 1 

Zuback, cf 6 2 2 1 

Ford, 2b 6 3 4 1 

Kaltreider, ss 4 2 1 3 3 

: Klinger, c 3 2 1 2 

Zeravica, c 2 1 1 

Schleig, rf 5 1 1 

I Zavarich, If 5 1 1 

I Lewis, lb 4 2 1 1 

I Gensel, p 5 1 1 

j Krouse, p 



THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 
MAY 2, 3, 4 

Joan Fontaine 
Lawrence Olivier 

"REBECCA" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
MAY 6 AND 7 



Ann Sheridan 
Jeffry Lynn 

It All Came True" 



a, 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 8 

Glenda Darnell 
John Payne 

"STAR DUST" 



(Continued from Page 1) 
George Spiggle, Sara Williams, George 
MacQuesten, Mary Emma Yoder, Wil- 
liam Nye, Stanley Baxter, Margaret 
Chamberlain, Lawrence Cady, and 
Jack Mayer. 

The technical staff is working fev- 
erishly to find the solutions to the spe- 
cial problems posed by "Criminal at 
Large." Lawrence Cady and Jack May- 
er of the Lighting Committee, have de- 
signed a special light dimmer for use 



in the performance, the present dim- 
mer not being able to meet the exacting 
requirements demanded by the play- 
wright's directions, to help create the 
weird atmosphere. 

Two performances will be presented 
by the Theatre Guild. One, May 17, 
two weeks away, is for the benefit of 
the guild and connoisseurs of the mys- 
tery drama. Business Committee chair- 
man for the first performance is 
Pierce Allen Coryell. The second per- 
formance will be an Alumni Association 
benefit, for which production Vernon 
Blough, Alumni Secretary, is in charge 
of the business arrangements. 



Totals 47 12 9 13 10 

Juniata AB R H A E 

Valigorski, ss 6 3 3 1 3 

Siemon, cf 6 2 4 

Bergstresser, c 4 4 2 2 

Grega, 2b 6 1 2 2 4 

Leopold, lb 6 1 2 

Cooper, If 5 1 1 

Walter, 3b 4 2 1 3 3 

Castle, p 5 1 

Simpkins, rf 4 1 2 1 



Totals 46 14 16 10 13 

Susquehanna ... 02102013 3—12 
Juniata 61114000 1—14 

Two base hits — Susquehanna, Ford. 
Lewis. 

Three base hits— Zeravica. 

Left on bases— Susquehanna 8, Jun- 
iata 8. 

Base on balls— Off Gensel 1, off 
Castle 2. 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • » 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
MAY 3 AND 4 

WALT DISNEY'S 

"PINOCCHIO" 

IN 

TECHNICOLOR 

MONDAY, MAY 6 

John Ciarfield 

Pat O'Brien 

Ann Sheridan 

"Castle On The 
Hudson" 

TUESDAY, MAY 7 

Preston Foster 

Andy Devine 

Ellen Drew 

"GERONIMO" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
MAY 8 AND 9 

Henry Fonda 
Jane Darinell 

"GRAPES OF 
WRATH" 



Compliments of 

KLINE'S 

MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Farmers National 
Bank 

Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are interested in a Bigger 
SUSQUEHANNA 

and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 

Let us join hands in Making Thli 
Come True 



VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna. 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Typewriters 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The I faxatt Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELTNSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



325 Market St 
SUNBURY - 



- 706 Market St 
MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa 



DIAMONDS WATCHES 

Have Your Watch Repaired Now. 

No Watch Too Small. All 

Work Guaranteed. 

W. M. VALSING 

Jewel t Selinsgrove, Pa. 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 

RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students, Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



Watsontown Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 

AND 

PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
WaUontown, Pa. Paxtonvllle, Pa 



PAGE FOTR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1940 



Special Aids Given 
In Vocational Choice 



Mrs. Gait Tells o. I), s. Dickinson, Juniata 

About 'Women in Egypt' 



Many .students come to college with 
definite plans for their future. Many 
of them have definite goals in life 
now; but the majority of college fresh- 
men have very hazy ideas about their 
future; especially are they confused 
concerning the choice of their life's 
work. These people represent the ma- : 
jority of the college freshmen, and 
definitely need the advice, and aid of 
some more experienced person. 

Susquehanna University sponsors a 
definite vocation planning program to 
encourage students to secure accurate 
information about the vocations in 
which he is interested and the build- 
ing of a body of knowledge of qualifi- 
cations to enter and be successful in 
the occupation. 

A series of vocation interest tests are 
given to such students who believe that . 
they possess special interests or abili- 
ties. A special section of references in 
the University Library is maintained 
so that students may get acquainted 
with the literature about the different 
professions. This material may be very 
helpful to those who already have de- j 
cided in which field they are better 
skilled. Additional facts and records i 
may be located which will clear any 
misconstrued ideas which you may have j 
secured. 

Dean Russell Gait has also appointed 
special professional advisers from his , 
faculty to keep in close conference with ! 
students who plan to enter the profes- 
sions or pursue further study. These 
conferences with the professional ad- 
visers enlighten the students on such 
matters as schools, admissions, costs, 
scholarships, and courses. 



Last Wednesday evening, the second 
in the present series of educational 
programs was conducted by Omega 
Delta Sigma sorority. Mrs. Russell 
Gait was the guest speaker. She dis- 
cussed the topic, "The Social Position 
of Women in Egypt." 

Mrs. Gait appeared before the group 
in a peasant woman's costume. The 
girls were impressed by the desolate, 
boring existence of an Egyptian wom- 
an's life. The life of the peasant is 
filled with drudgery and filth. Another 
startling statement revealed that only- 
one out of every hundred women is 
able to read and write. 

The most interesting part of the dis- 
cussion was the vivid description of an 
Egyptian wedding with all of its form, 
customs, and superstition. 

The concensus of opinion among the 
girls is that we are very thankful to 
be independent American women, and 
that we don't have to endure the Ori- 
ental mode of civilization. 

After the meeting the sorority acted 
as hostess to their guest by having din- 
ner as a group in the dining hall. 

S 

FRANK SIMON AND LEONA 
MAY SMITH TO APPEAR HERE 



Defeat S. U. Netmen 



Tennis Appears Promising Despite 
Opening Setback; Williams, Bantley, 
and Jones Take Their Matches 



defeated Wil- 
6-1; Overcash- 
McCord-Bantley, 
defeated 



Non-LettermenCompete 
With (arson Long 

Last Saturday the non-lettermen of 
the track team participated in an in- 
formal meet at New Bloomfield with 
the Carson Long cadets. Although in 
the final analysis Susquehanna was far 
superior in the weight and field events, 
Carson Long trackmen were faster in 
the running events, and defeated S. U. 

One of the outstanding events was 
the 100 yard dash, the time of which 
was 9.9 seconds, in which Leib took a 
third place, his time being 10.3 sec- 
onds. In the high jump, George Her- 
man took first place with a height of 
5'3V. while in the 12-lb shot put. 
Templin came first with a put of 38'6", 
"Lou" Baylor taking second place. Phil 
Templin also took first place in the 
discus with a throw of 96'6", and Bay- 
lor and Kaufman took .second and 
third places, respectively. There were 
no high hurdles, 2 mile run. or pole 
vault. 

The Carson Long school has just had 
a new track made, which is not yet in 
the best of condition, being covered 
with a gravel of coal, rather than the 
usual cinders. In two places on the 
track puddles of water acted as tem- 
porary obstacles. 

Tills sort of meet was considered a 
success in that it helped to bind the 
athletic relationship between the two 
Schools, as well as give the non-letter- 
men ;t chance. Coach Stagg expects to 
have another such meet for these same 
nun later m the Spring with another 
high school of repute. 

S 

S. I. STI DIES READY 
FOR DISTRIBUTION 



i Continued from Page 1) 
lations >et up by the Comptroller 
ot the Currency n-s iw,ed in June. 1938, 
and advocates principles ol regulation 
made upon more scientific ha > 

Next in order i, a discussion of 

"Presidential Disfranchisement in Ar- 
kansas" as viewed b; Dr. William A. 
RUKS, head of the Hist on and Political 

sea nee Department Thi article give 
an authoritative evaluation of the 

method used m restoring Arkansas to 
lull legal status in the Union after 
1860. 

Fourthly, Mr. Carter C Osterbind 
present- a very readable pro and con 
discussion of the 'Tennessee Vallej 
Authoritj at a Yardstick," in which he 
mentions the chief advantages and 

weaknesses ol the policj ol yardstick 
Inj as followed b] the New Deal 

Dr Arthur h. Wilson dues the series 

with an article on the Universal Ap- 
peal m Shakespeare." Dr, Wilson con- 
tends that Shakespeare's works have 
human Interest value and will, there- 
tore, , ompete w Ith reduc- 
tion! ol the present (lav 



(Continued from Page It 
night. 

Simon rehearses on Saturday morn- 
ing. 
Clinic on Saturday afternoon at 1:45. 
Mass drill maneuvers Saturday at 3. 
Festival concert Saturday evening at 
8:15. 

This annual band festival affords an 
incentive for the Individual musician to 
improve his talents and furnishes an 
opportunity for band directors to take 
active part In the preparation of teach- 
ing, training, and coaching an organ- 
ization of large proportion. This year 
the assisting conductors will be Donald 
N. Luckenbill, music director for the 
West Hazleton and the Freeland school 
districts, and Samuel W. Kurtz, music 
supervisor for the Bloomsburg public 
schools. 

The bandmasters who are cooperat- 
ing in the training of the select mu- 
sicians include: Ray Steeley, Ashland; 
Frank Schoendorfer, Jersey Shore; 
Samuel Haupt, Trevorton; Bruce 
Houseknecht, Milton; Helen Edwards, 
Towanda; Ray B. Minich, Lykens; P. 
J. Fisher. Loysville; C. E. Swalm. Wll- 
hamstown; P. S. Mitchell, Lewistown; 
Leo Minechbach, Pottsville; Paul Freed, 
Wildwood. N. J.; Marion Walter, New 
Bloomfield; Harold Bollinger. North- 
umberland; P. F. Bartges, Aaronsburg; 
Robert Beckman. Sunbury; George 
Anderson, Shamokin; Elrose L. Allison. 
Selinsgrove; D. J. Lewis. Hazleton; W. 
O. Roberts. Wllkes-Barre; Angelo 
D'Alexandro. Kulpmont; Charles Cole- 
man. Beavertown; J. J. Stief, Mt. Car- 
mel; Kenneth Blyler. Fallsington; M. 
T. Kemmerer, Tamaqua; and Paul A. 
Harner, New Oxford. 

Behind the scenes the following com- 
mittee is hard at work: All-Master 
Band Festival Conductor, Elrose Alli- 
son; business manager. Dr. Sheldon; 
ass't. business manager, Prof. Line- 
baugh; comptroller, Mr. Yorty; lib- 
rarian. Joseph Pasterchik; and secre- 
tary. Elaine Miller. 

The climaxing triumph of this three- 
day schedule of Intensive rehearsals 
will come when Dr. Simon takes up 
the baton to direct these high school 
musicians m their festival concert 
Which is to he held in the spacious 
gymnasium, The price of admission 
will be 50 cents, general; 25 cents, high 
school students. 



The tennis team opened Its season 
last Thursday In a match with Dick- 
inson College, at Carlisle. Due to the 
unsettled weather and the poor con- 
dition of the courts, the Susquehanna 
netmen were unable to hold any real 
practice, and consequently were in no 
condition to meet the Dickinson team, 
which won by a decisive score of 9-0. 
Singles 

Captain Czajowskl defeated Captain 
Williams, 6-1, 6-2; Olewiler defeated 
Sterrett, 6-2, 6-2; Overcash defeated 
McCord, 6-0, 6-2; Houdeshel defeated 
Bantley, 6-1, 6-0; Alice Abbott defeat- 
ed Schuck, 6-2, 6-4; Ying LI defeated 
Jones, 6-0, 6-0. 
Doubles 

Czajowski-Olewiler 
liams-Sterrett, 6-2, 
Houdeshel defeated 
6-0, 8-6; Silver-Rosenberg 
Mitman-Walsh. 8-6, 6-2. 

The second match was held at Hunt- 
ingdon with Juniata College last Sat- 
urday. The team did better than In its 
first match, but lost again, this time 
by a score of 5-3. Captain Williams de- 
feated Boyd easily, Bantley and Jones 
also winning matches for Susquehanna. 
There Is one Interesting feature con- 
cerning this match. This is the sur- 
prising number of third sets that had 
to be played, which accounted for the 
fact that the third doubles match had 
to be called for darkness, after each 
team had won a set. 
Singles 

Williams defeated Boyd, 6-1, 7-5; 
Barben defeated Sterrett, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1; 
Ayers defeated McCord, 9-7, 6-3; Bant- 
ley defeated Gehret, 6-3, 6-4; Stewart 
defeated Schuck, 6-0, 6-0; Jones de- 
feated Griffith, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5. 
Doubles 

Boyd-Barben defeated Williams- 
Sterrett, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3; Gehret- Ayers 
defeated McCord-Schuck, 6-1, 4-6. 6-2; 
Bantley-Jones tied Stewart-Griffith 
8-6, 4-6. 

The match originally scheduled with 
Scranton-Keystone for yesterday will 
not be played until a later date. 

S 

DR. GALT ANNOUNCES 
LATEST HONOR ROLL 



Mother's Day Gift 

Such a gift can be found in the 
Susquehanna Cook Book. Only fifty 
are left of the limited edition which 
are to be distributed. How delightful 
to have a "Susquehanna Cake" named 
by the dietician of the college! Copies 
can be secured from the Dean of Wom- 
en or from the Book Room for the price 
of $1.25. Proceeds will help in paying 
for the furniture for Seibert Hall pur- 
chased by the Ladies' Auxiliary. Send 
one home to mother this Mother's Dav. 



Campus Club Luncheon 

Held at Lewisburg 



The Campus Club of Susquehanna 
University held its annual luncheon for 
members at 1 p. m. Saturday. April 27, 
at the Hotel Lewisburger. Lewlsburg, 
Penna, Following the luncheon, Chin- | 
ese Checkers and Bridge were played, j 
Mrs. A. A. Stagg, Jr., was chairman of j 
the committee in charge of arrange- 
meats. Other members of the commit- j 
tee were as follows: Mrs. E. Edwin i 
Sheldon, Miss Mary Potteiger, Miss 
Audrey North. Miss Beatrice Herman,/ 
Mrs. Charles B. Foelsch, and Miss Viola ; 
DuFrain. 

The club is composed of women mem- I 
bers of the university faculty and wives | 
of the male faculty. Mrs. James Free- 
man is chairman of the club. 



Business Society Makes 
Field Trip to Berwick 

On Thursday, April 25, the Business 
Society sponsored a trip to the Ameri- 
can Car and Foundry Company at Ber- 
wick. Penna. The several cars left Sei- 
bert Hall at 12:30 and the trip around 
the plant was begun at 1:45. It was a 
very worthwhile and interesting trip 
including detailed explanations of the 
output of tanks, subway cars, wheels, 
aluminum parts, and many other 
things. There are four thousand work- 
ers and three hundred office people em- 
ployed by this concern. 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



Large Audiences Hear 
Motet Closing Concerts 

The students of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity were given the privilege of 
hearing their own Motet Choir In the 
annual concert, given on Sunday, April 
28, at 2:30 P. M. in the Trinity Luth- 
eran Church of Selinsgrove. A goodly 
number attended and enjoyed the sing- 
ing by this splendid organization. 

At the Lutheran Church in Lewis- 
town on this same evening, the Choir 
indeed fulfilled the expectations of all 
who heard it. The Church was packed 
with a very pleasing audience and the 
singers responded with excellent tone 
quality, beautiful harmony and with- 
out a doubt earned their title as the 
"Prize Winners of Choral Music." 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERING AND 
INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



(Continued from Page 1) 
be overcome by taking a certain per- 
centage of the student body to make 
up the list. 

Dean Gait stated that this new sys- 
tem wouid very likely be used to de- 
termine the honor roll at the end of 
this semester. 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL CAFE 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 




RAICH'S 

Sanitary 
ONE PRI 

Hair Cuts 



BARBER 
SHOP 

Sanitary Service 

ONE PRICE FOR 

All 
Week 



25c 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsg-rove, Pa, 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Wait 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
FREE 

Shoe Shine Parlor 

NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Full Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



BRESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

F<>r Information addri 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MELT AM) EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthorn 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 



Sunbury, Pa. 






SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B., B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



Student Recital Thursday Evening 

The students of the Conservatory 
will give a recital tomorrow evening at 
8:15 p. m. in the Chapel. 

Sister Anna Ebert to Speak 

The women of the Student Christian 
Association will have Sister Anna Ebert 
of the Philadelphia Motherhouse for 
Deaconesses as their guest speaker at 
a meeting Thursday evening at 10 p. 
m. in Seibert Hall. Miss Ebert will tell 
of the life of the Lutheran deaconess. 

Baseball, Tennis Teams at 
Bucknell Friday 

Susquehanna's baseball and tennis 
teams will travel to Bucknell Friday 
afternoon where they will engage the 
Bisons. 

Sub-Freshman Day Saturday- 
All Susquehanna is preparing to wel- 
come some two hundred prospective 
students to the campus Saturday. An 
elaborate program of entertainment 
has been arranged. The ten and eleven 
o'clock classes will not meet. 

May Day Activities 

The university will celebrate May 
Day this Saturday by a series of ac- 
tivities sponsored by the Women's Ath- 
letic Association. The annual May Day 
pageant and coronation ceremony will 
begin at 2 p. m. at the rock garden. 

Junior Prom Saturday Evening 

The Class of 1941 will entertain at 
the annual Junior Prom Saturday 
evening from 8 to 12. Rex Rockweil 
and Bobbie O'Conner will be music at- 
tractions at the affair. 

Track Team to Meet American 
University 

Coach Stagg's cindermen will seek 
their first win of the season Saturday 
afternoon at 3 o'clock when they en- 
gage American University on the local 
track. 

Juniata Tennis Team Here 

Among the athletic events of Sub- 
Freshman Day will be a tennis match 
between Susquehanna and Juniata Col- 
lege on the Crusader courts at 3 p. m. 

Tennis Tournament to be Held Here 

Coach Stagg announces that the high 
schools of this district will participate 
in a tennis tournament to he held on 
the local courts on Saturday. 

Baseball at Upsala 

The baseball team will journey to 
East Orange. New Jersey, next Tues- 
day, where they will engage a strong 
Upsala nine. 

French, Business Clubs to 
Meet Tuesday 

Both the French Club and the Busi- 
ness Club is scheduled for a meeting 
to be held in Steele Science Hall next 
Tuesday evening. 



Gait Makes Awards 
Of Scholastic Cups 



Sigma Alpha Iota, Bond & Key Win 
Respective Cups; Achievements Are 
Illustrative of Culture Acquired 



This morning during the Chapel ex- 
ercises the college observed Academic 
Recognition Day at which time Dean 
Russell Gait announced the winners 
of the Inter-Sorority and the Inter- 
Fraternity Scholarship Cups. 

Dean Gait stated that he was mere- 
ly acting as the agent of these two or- 
ganizations by whom the cups have 
been awarded each year to the Soror- 
ity and the Fraternity attaining the 
highest scholastic rating for the last 
semester of the past school year and 
the first semester of the present school 
term. In addition to this fact. Dean 
Gait expressed the main idea which 
the winning of these cups proves. The 
business of a Liberal Arts College is 
besides a preparation for a profession, 
to give people culture. One of the 
elements in culture is the quality of 
being well-read, another the possession 
of the facts with which one can think. 
Now, these cups are a symbol of the 
culture which has been gained by the 
students in the organizations which 
secure them. 

The winner of the Inter-Sorority 
cup is Sigma Alpha Iota, the music 
sorority which had an average of 1.71. 
The averages of the other two are: K. 
D. P. 1.66, and O. D. S. 1.64. Tire cup 
lias been in the possession of O. D. S. 
'or the last two years. 

The winner of the Inter-Fraternity 
cup is Bond and Key, which had an 
average of 1.39. The averages of the 
other two are: Beta Kappa, 1.35, and 
Phi Mu Delta, 1.15. This cup is the 
(Continued on Page 4> 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY. MAY 8. 1941 



Number I 



Central Figures of the Annual May Day Coronation 




-ffNhJB f 

kAhi-tfil-WAlTINCf 



Eunice. flf?£HTZ, k&y/'-iN-wriNq OtARkdrrs. <?4/<V 

Susquehanna To Welcome Sub Freshmen Guests Saturday; 
May Day Festival and Junior From Feature Week-End 



200 Visitors Expected at 
Susquehanna for Active 
Program on Saturday 

On Saturday, May 11, Susquehanna 
University's Alumni Association will 
cooperate with the college administra- 
tion and sponsor the first Annual Sub- 
Freshman Day on the campus. 

The college campus routine will be 
as usual so that that the visiting stu- 
dents will be able to see first hand real 
campus life. They will be permitted 
to see the college students in their 
classes and will also be able to hear a 
short concert by the Motet Choir. They 
will be the guests of the University 
at a band concert, collegiate track 
meet, tennis match, and the annual 
May Day Festival. 

The scheduled program for Sub- 
Freshman day is as follows: 
10:00 a. m— Registration 
10:30 to 11:30— Classroom Visitation 
Amateur Radio Demonstration— Sta- 
tion W8TIW 
Chemical and Biological Laboratory 

Experiments 
Demonstration with Business Ma- 
chines 
Music Techniques Demonstration- 
Conservatory of Music 
11:30 a. m— Chapel Convocation with 
Motet Choir and Address by Dr. G. 
Morris Smith, President of Susque- 
hanna University 
12:15 p. m.— Luncheon in College Din- i 

ing Hall 
12:45 to 1:30— Band Concert in front of ! 
Seibert Hall (in this same period, 
prospective students may feel free to 
visit campus and library with visit- 
ing alumni and regular students.) 
2:00 p. m— May Day Festival 
3:00 p. m— College Track Meet- 
American University vs. Susque- 
hanna 

, S 



NOTICE 

Tickets for the Junior Prom are 
available now from Donald Ford, 
Elaine Miller, Harry Thatcher, or 
Douglas Portzline. Juniors are urg- 
ed to get their tickets immediately. 
Program! will be distributed Friday 
to those who have bought their 
tickets before that time. Tickets 
will be on sale at the door Saturday 
evening. 



W.A.A. to Sponsor May 
Day Events; to Present 
Old English Pageant 

Extensive plans are being made for 
the annual May Day exercises, in which 
the beautiful May court of 1940 will 
appear Saturday afternoon. 

This year the court consists of: 
Madalene Hayes. May queen; Anne 
Hill, lady in waiting; Margaret Shees- 
ley, Naomi Bingaman, Dorothy Shutt. 
Eunice Arentz, Charlotte Baish, and 
Marie Edlund. These ladies have been 
rated to those positions by a ballot of 
ihe entire student body. 

May Day will officially open again 
this year with a breakfast sponsored 
by the Women's Athletic Association 
in honor of the queen and her court to 
be served at 7:15 a. m. in Horton Din- 
ing Hall. 

The festival will begin promptly at 
2:00 p. m. on May 11 in front of the 
rock garden at Hassinger Hall. 

Miss Irene Shure, instructor of Phy- 
sical Education and Director of Girls' 
Work, has written the May Day pag- 
eant for the third consecutive year. 

Miss Shure conducted a contest for 
plots among the students of her 
eurythmics classes. The winning plot 
was submitted by Clyde Sechler who 
will play the role of the jester in the 
pageant. 

The leading roles of this year's fes- 
tival are held by Mary Emma Yoder as 
queen and Karl Young as the Lord 
Mayor. An English village is celebrat- 
ing its traditional May Day Festival. 
The celebration is divided into three 
part*, The Procession for which 
Johnny Smith is the page; Paul Ovre- 
bo, Jr., the crown bearer; Karl Young, 
the mayor; Neil Fisher, the trumpet- 
er; Jack Helm, the minstrel; Clyde 
Sechler. the jester; August Kauffman. 
the prince; Michael Wolf, Jack Walsh, 
Harold Mitman, and Jack Helm are 
the suitors; Vincent Frattali, the sher- 
iff; John Hudspeth, the juggler; Mar- 
ion Crow and John Burke are the 
hobby horse. 

The ladies of the court are Lois 
Davis. Melissa Smoot, and Eleanor 
Smith, Louise McWUUami Is a gypsy, 

and Doris Welsh and Peggy Chamber- 
lain are tumbli i . 

After the Procession come the dances 
and contests to amuse the court. There 
are six dances | gypsy lolo dance bv 
• Continued on Page 4» 



Rex Rockwell to Play; 
Bobbie O'Conner to Sing 
at Gala Event by Juniors 

A gala gathering for Susquehanna's 
student body, alumni, and guests, will 
be held this Saturday evening in the 
Alumni Gymnasium. The event which 
is such an attraction is the annual Jun- 
ior Prom which is this year being pre- 
sented by the class of '41. The dance 
this year will climax what may be call- 
ed the biggest day in the history of the 
university. Beside the May Day cele- 
bration, a newly initiated sub-fresh- 
man day program, a track meet, and a 
tennis match will keep the many visi- 
tors busy throughout the day. 

In the evening, the sweet swing 
rhythm of Rex Rockwell's orchestra 
will play for the dancers on the hard- 
woods of the local gymnasium. Amidst 
a panorama of beautiful decorations, 
furnished by the Harrisburg Decorat- 
ing Company, this fifteen piece musi- 
cal ensemble will provide real enter- 
tainment for the young couples who 
will be dancing. Rockwell's orchestra 
features the well known Bobby O'Con- 
nor on the vocal choruses, a singer 
whose reputation for swing singing has 
made him famous throughout the play- 
ground centers of the state of Penn- 
sylvania. The orchestra for the oc- 
casion originated in State College a 
number of years back and has cur- 
rently played throughout the entire 
eastern seaboard. 

The decorations for the affair will 
perhaps surpass those of any previous 
dance or junior prom on the local cam- 
pus. Three large lanterns, seven feet 
high and forty inches in diameter, will 
be strung from each girder of the gym, 
smaller lanterns suspended from lat- 
tice work will be placed at equal spaces 
along the side of the building with 
spring sport scene placed between tin .,■ 
spaces. At the entrance two large flow- 
er towers will provide a fitting setting. 

The programs for the occasion have 
already been obtained and will be dis- 
tributed by the ticket sellers to time 
who have bought tickets before noon 
Friday, Only a limited number of pro- 
grams have been obtained, so it is ad- 
visable for all campus students to ob- 
tain their tickets m plentj Of tune to 
receive 'heir programs. 

A receiving line will be part of the 
am at the annual Prom and a 
grand march or promenade will be held 
i Continued on Page 4' 



Dramatics Students 
Named to HonorClub 



Bergstresser and Young Lead Group 
of Fifteen Persons Eligible for Newly 
Formed Society; Hold Initial Meeting 



Two students were awarded high 
honors, two special mention, and thir- 
teen others were elected into the Sus- 
quehanna Theatre Guild Honors Club 
at a meeting last Tuesday of those stu- 
dents still in school who had qualified 
for the club as of June. 1939. 

Karl Young and Philip Bergstre 
received the high honors. Karl Young 
earned his by his services: as • Q. Mor- 
ris Weatherbee, 8r„" a major role in 
-Clarissa;" technical director of "S 
Door;" leading role of "Doremus Jess- 
up" in "It Can't Happen Here:" mem- 
dcal staff. "Parents and Pig- 
tails;" minor roles ol "Senator H 
wick" in "First Lady;*' bit role in 
"Stage Door." 

Philip Bergstresser won his I 
honors as stage manager of "SI 
Eoor;" member of the technical staff 
of "It Can't Happen Here;" major role 
as "John Richards" in "Parents and 
Pigtails;" member technical staff of 
same play; technical director. "First 
Lady" and "Criminal-at-Large." 

Both Grace Fries and Blanche 
Forney because of their work done be- 
yond qualification for membership 
were given special mention: Grace 
Fries— member of the business staff 
lor "Mama's Baby Boy" and "Stage 
Door;" bit role. "Stage Door;" stage 
i Continued on Page 3i 



Sorority and Frats 
Elect New Officers 



Ruth Speeht, George Bantley, and 
Merle Hoover to Head Respective Or- 
ganizations for 1940-1941 



During the past week one sorority 
and two fraternities have elected their 
officers for the coming year. They 
are: 

Omega Delta Sigma sorority— Ruth 
Specht. president; Lila Barnes, vice- 
president; Mary Emma Yoder, secre- 
tary; June Snyder, financial secretary; 
and Lois V. Davis, treasurer. 

Beta Kappa fraternity— Merle Vin- 
cent Hoover, arkon; Glenn Musser. 
deputy-arkon; Kenneth Bonsall. scribe: 
Willard Schadel. treasurer; G. Robert 
Booth, chancellor; and John Aucker, 
guard. 

Bond and Key Club— George Bant- 
ley. president; Clyde Sechler, vice- 
president; William Mitman. secretary; 
Donald L. Ford, house manager; and 
Samuel s. Fletcher, treasurer, 



Pi Gamma Mu Meets 
In Annual Banquet 



Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu held its fourteenth annual 
banquet and meeting in the dining 
room of the Governor Snyder Hotel 
on Monday evening at 6:15 p. m. Rev. 
Edward W. Ullrich delivered the ad- 
dress of the evening on the sociologi- 
cal aspects of the church. The meeting 
featured the initiation of the newly 
elected members and the election of 
Joseph Pasterchik as president for the 
coming year. Donald Billman, retiring 
president, presided as toastmaster. 

In a well received address, Rev. Ull- 
rich declared there was no great dif- 
ference between the ideals of the 
church and those of Pi Gamma Mu 
Fraternity. He cited examples from 
current events to show that there are 
an exceptionally large number of c; 
facing the world today -crises which, 
are likely to disturb even the very soul 
of man. 

He gave two alternative ways to 
sohe these crises: by taking things in- 
to our own hands, or by placing things 
in God's hands He continued t„ show 
how it was only logical that we should 

face c.od tor help when we met 
crisis 

The chmax of the addrt cami 

when lie reviewed thi 
made by the church in spite 01 
small numbers and asked that we work 
tor greater unity and harmonj m the 

Church movement thai, by done 
we may lend aid to a troubled W01 

Four newly elected members were 

i Continued or. Page 2 > 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1940 



rpTjr QTT^sOTTFHAlVlVA ^ ex ^ oc ^ we ^ an ^ Hls $tf teen P ' ece ^ a,n ^ Which Will Play at Junior Prom 



Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
Interval • uired by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.0C a Year. Payable to Maxine Heefner. '42. Circulation Manager. 
Enti ■ the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 



THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REEoE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: Margaret Grenoble. '40; Anne Hill, '40; Virginia Mann, '40; G. Rob- 
ert Booth, 41; Miriam Garner. '41; Merle Hoover. 41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; 
Eleanor Smith, '41; Ruth Specht. '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; Blair Heaton. '42; 
Ruth Schwenk. '42; Willard Sterrett. '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor 
-.ell. - 43; Marv Cox, '43; Ella Fetherolf, - 43; Charles Gundrum, 
MacCartney. '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson 

Circulation Manager 

Advertising Manager 



Dan 
'43. 

Maxine Heefner 
Paul Shoemaker 




Business Assistants: Delphine Hoover. Robert MacQuesten. Stanley Stonesifer, 

Rex Sundav, Frank Morgan, Dorothy Weder, Frank Corcoran. 
Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. 

WEDNESDAY. MAY 8, 1940 



-&■ 



"BEETLE BARNEY 



>5 



- PREVIEWS .... 



WHY LOWER THE GRADES? 



Good afternoon, folkses. this is go to bed. But first he picked up true 

During the past several weeks there has been considerable BEE tle barney coming to you with love, he hopes, and then went for a 

^nccinn nrn nnrl rrm hv students and facultv about the Strin- the latest ins and outs of the out and walk. 

dlSCUSSlon piO ana COn Dy Students ana ldLU1 ^ u " inner club G n dear old Susquehanna's After a while we got back to G. A. 

gency of the grading system. There nave been cnaiges tnat campus x certainlv have a i t of stuff and i was certainly glad because i was 

"the administration is clamping down" too much. With those l0 tell b ut Mrs. Beetle Barney says I getting tired but lo and behold there edness and poverty are Henry Fonda, 

Who l'eel or ai^ue this way, I Should like to consider the various shouldn't tell too much so I'll only was no sleep yet because John bumped 



Wednesday and Thursday 
May 8 and 9 

GRAPES OF WRATH, a novel which 
proved a best seller, is now seen on the 
local screen in a picture which has the 
entire nation talking. Starring in this 
sensational drama of human wretch- 



fake su££estions All set here n oes 

factors involved and try to arrive at some logical conclusions. 1 was siuing in G A / mlndi „ g my 

There are two choices open to the administrators of any own business when who do you think 

college regarding academic policy: they can sacrifice scholastic ^^Lfm* ^«h 

standards in favor of large enrollments, or they can insist upon protested alarmingly but finally decid- 

the attainment of "par" grades from every student even though e d to hold. Then i heard another pro- 

the pursuing of this policy may result in a reduced enrollment. ^StJt^mSSV^ 

Susquehanna is attempting to follow the latter of these couises anyway it held and now t0 get on with 

my story. 

I heard Beam exclaim, "My isn't 
that just too lovely?" and then Reese 
answered, "Oh yes, how sweet. Is your's 
going to be like that?" The bell rang 

time the reputation of the institution falls in the eyes of edu- for class so I didn't hear the answer 
cational leaders, employers, and good students who may be en- ZTSJZ^^T^Tm 
rolled there. In wake of this soon comes the fatal result — en- all the ta i kin g was about and what do 
rollment falls because no respect is given to the degrees offered you think i saw. ah the lovely dresses 



and we are in favor of the idea one hundred per cent. 

When a college "lays down the bars" of academic require- 
ments and gives credit where credit is not due, it becomes a 
haven for non-college material — a "dummies' retreat." In 



Could it be that Beam 
— ? I hope not because I get sucn 
good rides on her skirt. 

While reflecting on these lovely 
thoughts my hero sat down beside me. 
I scurred on to his pants leg because 
he is so tall, and strong. You should 

respect in educational circles; its degrees will be of value; and se e him hit that baseball? Yes sir, my 

ii~„,,+ ,.,;n Ur, rHmuiot D fl John he's some boy. Well, he took me 

enrollment will be stimulated. to baseball game &t Dickinson on 

In the eighty-three years of its existence Susquehanna has Saturday He dldn . t d0 so good but 

At we had a swell time anyway. But poor 



by the institution. This evolution has been noted by educational ] 
authorities. 

If, on the other hand, a college issues no "watered stock" 
and graduates only students who can measure up in competi- 
tion with students from similar institutions, it can command 



into a couple and certainly surprised 
them. But you just can't tell who 
you'll bump into next can you? 

While the excitement was going on 
I dashed for Dr. Lawson's office, where 
my nest is and quietly went to bed. 
But I couldn't sleep for quite a while. 
I kept remembering what I heard the 
doctor say the other day in class that 
if things kept on, some day a miracle 
was going to take place and G. A. 
would be used for a study hall. Honest 
I never venture out at night anymore 
in G. A. because the traffic is so heavy 
I'm afraid I'll be run over. 

On Sunday I happened to catch on 
Bill Gehron's leg and we went for a 
lovely drive in the country. It was a 
bit chilly though, but he had blankets 
along to keep us warm. How thought- 
ful of him. 

I'm certainly getting a kick out of 
all the doings for initiation but the 
Mrs. says I shouldn't say anything that 
I see in them but boy I do see some 
funny sights. I hope all the little sor- 
ority sisters are over it by now. 

I suppose you all know that officially 
now there is no longer a freshman 
class. Moving up day occurs on Wed- 
nesday, May 8, in case you need telling. 

Mrs. just told me to quit fooling 
around and get that present mailed 
for mother so she gets it by Sunday 
so I guess I'd better scram. 

See you next week, 

BEETLE BARNEY. 



Mary Lee was chief fire-wood- f etcher, 
and did not a bad job at all. 

Latest news flashes from the Lit lie 
Theatre of G. A.: Sherrie Williams en- 
livened play practice by her appeal to 
the coach: "Mr. Freeman, I can't do 
anything with Shatto looking at me 
with those big brown eyes." The effect 
he had on her— gave her the giggles. 
That was bad enough, but when For- 



made continual progress along lines of academic standing 

present it is a member of the Middle States Association of Col- Gabby he was out of cigarettes. 

A1 - * i „„„w^+;,-.rT orvonm, f nr tbic arpfl Well, we got back from the trip and 

leges, the powerful accrediting agency foi this aiea. t ^^ ^ ^ John because l 

Among the many requirements which must be met by a knew that sooner or later John wou i d 

colleoe if it wishes to remain a member is the use of satisfac- take me back to g. a. and then i could 

tory standards of grading; a college might be dropped for fail- : tc ~" TCr s^tT A 1 /fT TCP" 

ure to comply in this respect. To be dropped from this Associa- | (J JVlUb-L UK AlVl U Dt, 

tion means: (1) you cannot enter a professional school of repute 

without first undergoing an entrance examination, (2) your Jjj^ mjgmjj^m. 
credits are not readily transferred to another school if you wish tumbling over each other last week, 
to change and (3) your teaching certificate commands less re- pottsviiie visitors, initiations, and the 

, -J band concert g ave t he always-full last 

spect. month of school a send-off. 

The famous Survey published by the Council of Education 0ur Pott sviiie mends, with their re- 
of the United Lutheran Church as well as other authoritative liable buses, allowed several of the 
works show conelus,vely that there is a normal curve of distri- mmmu^mn. £«M. show 

bution on which all college students may be ranked. An investi- Wolfei j errv Leib, and George Brosius rest Heckert tried to feed Mr. Freeman 
nation conducted recently Showed that Susquehanna was grant- even bid some of the girls quite an chloroform-well, play practice was 
o ailU11 ^»"^" , -» j ^ j^j- „ rmiww tM . adieu when thev left called off for a later and saner time. 

ing too many A's and B's to students who were doing only avei- acl ^ co w v '^ n l f n the week: Larry Isaacs , What have we here ? candies in the 

age work. This practice must be Stopped if the grade Of A is to p i ctU re floating around down at the wind, speeches on the sun dial, quarts ecutioner 
have the meanin"' which it rightfully Should have. According to high school, and around some girls of sawdust, queer attire <Teenie looked reV enge 
nave UK mcaiim b * & J „„ . fvnm fhp ™iw P neck at that. What an ornament for rather nice, though, in Bill's sweater 

reports, no more students are being lemoved nom tne college ^ locket!! 

roll for low grades now than formerly; the problem is to rank The w A A breakfast hike turned 

the students of the upper brackets in the grade levels where out not so long on the hike but oh boy 

rr the breakfast. Flo Reitz sure can fry 

they rightfully belong. bacon and eggs S pechtie. for so early 

We students stand to gain both immediately and in the in the morning, was in high spirits. 

long run from the efforts of the administration to improve the Not only did she turn out all dressed 

b _ , . ltA „ w-«a«i +« rr Q + iUoxr ™i1l to hike five miles, but she helped the 

grading system. By making an "A harder to get they will cooks and then volunleered t0 be 
stimulate most students to work harder; by bettering the rating chairman of the demolishing commit- 

Of the SChOOl thev are adding value to the sheepskins Which We tee. Welch and McWUliams. with some wearing latch strings^ 

OI ine scnoui imy ait auu n b TZujlm +~ ™ ;™ help, staged a throwing contest. Sev- And by the way-if any of you run 

will receive. Why should we hear so much opposition to an lm- pral of thdr mementos are by now into the weatherman put in tuque* 

pi'OVement SUCh as this? floating into the Chesapeake, or the hanna's bid for nice weather next Sat- 

\F\V STAFF POSITIONS CREATED ocean, or wherever Penn's Creek goes, urday. 

The mast head of this issue carries the names of the newly 
chosen sports editor and news editor. Also, in this issue there 
appears an associate editor and a staff photographer. These 
newly chosen staff members will assist in the publication of 
The Susquehanna during the coming school year 



John Carradine, and Jane Darwell. 
This picture of stark human realities 
brings to the screen an unparalleled 
production through its superb acting 
which makes it appear almost a reality. 
Radio and screen commentators have 
voiced their highest praise to their vast 
personal followings and they report 
that this sensational drama surpasses 
anything in their entire experience. 

Friday, May 10 

Columbia brings to the local screen 
another in its series of Blondie pic- 
tures. This time it is BLONDIE ON A 
BUDGET, starring again the stars of 
this series, Penny Singleton, Arthur 
Lake, and Larry Simms. In this pic- 
ture, Blondie and her husband reveal 
the hardships which they must under- 
go because of financial troubles which 
result in an amusing but nevertheless 
nearly tragic budget for the entire 
family. 

Monday, May 12 

CHARLIE CHAN IN PANAMA stars 
Sidney Toler, Jean Rogers, and Lionel 
Atwill in a thrilling melodrama which 
represents one of the best Chan pro- 
ductions by 20th-Century-Fox. As the 
title suggests Charlie Chan is in Pan- 
ama tracking down a famous spy ring 
and guarding the secrets of this vital 
pathway to two oceans from foreign 
agents who are working against the 
American government. 

Tuesday, May 13 

TOWER OF LONDON is a drama of 
English royalty of the 15th century, the 
warring days when Richard III (Basil 
Rathbone), Edward IV dan Hunter), 
Queen Elizabeth (Barbara O'Neill and 
others were all savagely struggling for 
power. Among other historical char- 
acters presented are several princes. 
Henry Tudor (Ralph Forbes) and Anne 
Neville (Rose Hobart). In the cast are 
Boris KarlofT as the executioner, and 
Vincent Price, Nan Grey, John Sut- 
ton, and Leo Carroll. In the story of 
this diabolical, misshapen figure, the 
screen presents a spectacle of unequal- 
led magnitude. . .the wide-swept furies 
of a nation driven to maniacal revolt 
.the shadow of a bestial-faced ex- 
a populace screaming 



i 



for 



and hat», black marks, traffic tied up 
on Market street, and food such as 
man never ate before. Nothing but 
initiations, some of them queer enough 
to make people think of Danville, eh, 
Hudspeth? 

Things not to be equalled: Stan Bax- 
ter's singing. Sid Kemberling's ability 
to get a girl, Joe Campana's Saturday 
night visitors, and the girls of Scibert 



PI GAMMA MU MEETS 
IN ANNUAL BANQUET 



ff ODDS 'N ENDS" 



The past week has been a busy one 
in fraternity circles, and things will 
not be quiet for a few more days. Phi 

The news editor post was filled by The Susquehanna Pub- mu Delta started the bail roiling last 

1IM news eanoi pus* was ww kj 4 Tuesday when their lowly pledges were 

iishing Association; the associate editor, spoits editoi, ana stan mA to par(s unknown t0 bring ba ck 
photographer were appointed by the editor-in-chief under au- 
thority granted him in Article IV, section 1, e, of the Constitu- 
tion of the Susquehanna Publishing Association. 

The staff photographer will be given the responsibility for 
taking and developing pictures of campus activities so that 
The Susquehanna may carry picture as well as word portrayal 
of campus affairs. 



the impossible. The boys went from 
Slim Gut to Chicken Switch to bring 
back all the news. Some fellows are 
Making jobs as census takers in the 
1940 census because they think they 
bare hud enough experience. John 
Hudspeth had a hard time explaining 
his problem to a farmer who caught 
him in his chicken coop "just looking 



around." Bill Curry is now a skilled 
lumberman. It seems Bill carried two 
by fours for a few hours before he 
found the correct size. Larry Isaacs 
doesn't say much but his face gets 
very red when he is asked too many 
questions about his quest. Phi Mu 
Delta completed their ceremony with 
a candle parade from Hassinger to the 
Fraternity House. After the informal 
initiation was held sixteen happy fel- 
lows sighed and said good night. 

Beta Kappa is still active, so don't 
be alarmed if you should see Jay Auck- 
cr counting windows, he is still quite 



(Continued from Page 1) 
initiated by the official ceremony, ied 
by Donald Billman. The newcomers 
are: Paul Shatto, Marion Boyer, Harry 
Thatcher, and Joseph Pasterchik. 

During the business meeting reports 
were heard from the various commit- 
tees of the activities carried on during 
the year. Dr. Dunkelberger, secretary- 
treasurer, read the financial report for 
the past year. 

Joseph Pasterchik was elected to 
head the organization during the com- 
ing year; Marion Boyer was named to 
assist him. 

The meeting was closed by the group 
singing the Susquehanna University 
Alma Mater. 






normal. Harry Wilcox and Don Ba- 
shore are collectors now but not of 
stamps. If you're interested in new 
hobbies look them up and they can 
give you some rare pointers. 

In closing let us extend the hand of 
fellowship to all those who have com- 
pleted or will have completed their in- 
itiations soon. In order to have a 
strong school we must have such fine 
examples of brotherhood come to the 
front. Congratulations to you all. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 8. 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE TIIltEE 









I 






THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



E'town Defeated in ! Juniata Defeats S. U, 
Baseball by Krouse In Local Track Meet 



-<s>- 



Krouse Pitches for Third Victory of 
Season; Susquehanna Wins by Score 
of 8-1 



Yesterday afternoon the Susque- 
hanna Crusaders romped over Eliza- 
bethtown to the tune of 8-1. It was the 
best exhibition of baseball the local 
fans have had this year. The Crusad- 
ers displayed their ability to hit the 
fast ones by pounding Shirk out of the 
box in the fifth inning. Krouse, who 
pitched for the home team, gave the 
visitors only three hits and one score. 

The game stood one to nothing in 
favor of E-town till the fifth inning 
when John Schleig started a six run 
rally with a scorching double into left 
field. It was just a matter of playing 
out the game then, for the visitors be- 
came demoralized and the Crusaders 
scored twice more to make the final 
count 8-1. Ford continued his hitting 
streak by belting out a pair of safe 
ones. 



Batmen Drop Close 
Game to Dickinson 



Motet Wins Acclaim 
In Season's Concerts 



Compliments of 

KLINE'S 

MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Pritehard, Deardorf, and Richards 
Take Firsts in Respective Events; 
Final Score: 87-39 



Bill Troutman Resigns 
Position on Track Team; 
WillManageLocal Hotel 

Coach A. A. Stagg, track mentor, has 
announced that William "Bill" Trout- 
man has resigned his position on the 
varsity track team. Troutman decided 
to take this action because the pres- 
sure placed upon him by his academic 
schedule and by his position at Gov- 
ernor Snyder Hotel, where he has re- 
cently been promoted to the position 
of manager. 

Bill began his track career during 
his sophomore year at Susquehanna. 
During that year he ran the mile, and 
served the team well as a consistent 
point-winner. Last year he ran both 
the mile and the two mile and again 
accounted for a good share of the 
team's points. He was chosen along 
with Burt Richard to co-captain the 
cindermen during this season. He 
intended to specialize on the two mile 
run this season. 

The members of the track team re- 
gret the loss of a member who has 
shown himself to be such a diligent 
worker during the past. 



Tennis Team Loses 
Three Latest Matches 





Bantley, McCord, Mitman, Schuck, | 
Win Matches Against Elizabethtown, 
Bucknell, and Moravian 



Last Friday, Saturday, and yesterday, 
the tennis team played three tennis 
matches, against Moravian, Bucknell, 
and Elizabethtown, respectively. The 
team lost to all three of these schools. 
The score of the Moravian match was 
6-3, Schuck being the only man to win 
his singles match, while the second and 
third doubles teams winning their 
matches. The summaries: Sterrett (M) 
def. William, 0-6, 6-3, 6-0; Goldenberg 
def. Sterrett (S), 6-3, 6-3; Schuck def. 
Donchez, 9-7, 3-6, 7-5; Blasco def. Mc- 
Cord, 7-5, 6-1; Kilpatrick def. Bantley, 
6-2, 6-0; Konrad def. Jones 6-2, 6-2. 
In the doubles, Sterrett-Donchez <M) 
def. Williams-Sterrett <S> 6-4, 6-2; 
McCord-Schuck def. Blasco-Kilpatrick, 
3-6, 6-3, 6-4; Bantley-Mitman def. 
Goldenberg-Konrad, 8-6, 7-5. 

Saturday at Bucknell the netmen lost ] 
again by a score of 8-1, the one match j 
being forfeited. The summaries; Grif- : 
fin def. Williams, 6-1, 6-0; Carson def. 
Sterrett, 6-2, 6-0; Richardson def. j 
Schuck, 6-0, 6-0; Cronk def. McCord, 
6-4, 6-1; Culbertson def. Bantley, 6-3, ] 
6-3; Pink def. Jones, 6-3, 6-3. In the ; 
doubles, Griffin-Richardson def. Wil- 
Uams-McCord, 6-2, 6-2; Carson-Cronk 
forfeited to Schuck-McCord; Pink- I 
Wells def. Jones-Bantley, 6-3, 6-2. 

Yesterday on our courts Elizabeth- 
town defeated the team again, the 
score being 4-3, Schuck and Bantley 
winning their singles matches, and i 
Schuck-McCord winning their doubles 
match, The summaries: Leicht def. 
Williams, 7-5, 6-2; Eckroth def. Ster- I 
rett, 8-6, 6-4; Weaver def. McCord, 6-3, 
6-1; Schuck def. Ruth, 6-0. 6-0; Bant- 
ley def. Kinsburg, 7-5, 6-2. In the 
doubles, Leicht-Eckroth def. Williams- 
Sterrett, 13-11. 6-2; McCord-Schuck 
def. Weaver-Ruth, 3-6, 8-6, 6-3. 



A strong Juniata track team invaded 
Susquehanna last Saturday, and with 
a determination to break some of their 
own school records they romped to an 
easy victory over the locals. The In- 
dians were strong in everything but 
the dashes, for only three first places 
were captured by Susquehanna run- 
ners. Pritehard won the hundred yard 
dash, Deardorf the two-twenty, and 
Richards won the broad jump. 

The best performances for the day 
were turned in by Juniata men. Shef- 
fer. who ran the mile for the Indians, 
made the four laps in the best time 
for many a year at Susquehanna. His 
time in the event was 4:41.6, just six- 
tenths of a second over his school rec- 
ord. Weber, football and basketball 
captain, also proved himself a track 
man by running a 2:03 half mile. These 
times were very goo but they would 
have been even better if the runners 
were not hampered by a strong win. 

This Saturday the Crusaders will 
take on the runners from American 
University. The meet should be a very 
good one since the teams are more 
evenly matched. All pre-meet infor- 
mation shows that the locals should 
win their first track meet of the season 
against the boys from the South. 

Summary of events: 
Running Events 

Mile Run: Won by Sheffer (J); sec- 
ond, Noffsinger (J); third, MacQues- 
ten (S). Time 4:41.6. 

440 Yard Run: Won by Nettleton 
(J); second, Wilson (J); third, Shusta 
<S). Time, 54.3. 

100 Yard Dash: Won by Pritehard 
<S); second, Deardorf (S); third, 
Strayer (J). Time, 10.4. 

120 Yard High Hurdles: Won by 
Mitchell (J); second, Sheirer (J); third, 
Pritehard <S>. Time, 16.2. 

880 Yard Run: Won by Weber (J); 
second, Sheffer (J); third, Templin 
MET. Time, 2:05. 

220 Yard Dash: Won by Deardorf 
<S>; second, Pritehard (S); third, Net- 
tleton (J). Time, 23.5. 

Two Mile Run: Won by Noffsinger 
(J); second, Thatcher (S); third, Leit- 
er (J). Time, 11:18.4. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles: Won by 
Thorne (J); second, Mitchell (J); 
third, Richards <S>. Time, 26.5. 
Field Events 

Pole Vault: Won by Sell <J); second, 
Bair (J) and Learn (S), tie. Height, 
10 feet 6 inches. 

High Jump: Won by Pentz (J); sec- 
ond, Heaton <S> and Sheirer (J), tie. 
Distance, 5 feet 9 inches. 

Shot Put: Won by Sheirer (J); sec- 
ond, Wright (J); third, Templin <S>. 
Distance, 39 feet, 3 inches. 

Discus: Won by Sheirer (J); second, 
Wright (J); third, Stratton (J). Dis- 
tance, 125 feet 5 inches. 

Broad Jump: Won by Richards <S); 
second, Pentz <J>; third, Learn iS>. 
Distance, 20 feet TH inches. 

Javelin: Won by Weber (J); second, 
Richards (S); third, Kaufman <S>. 
Distance, 152 feet, 4 : i inches. 

Final score: Susquehanna 39, Jun- 
iata 87. 

S 

DRAMATICS STUDENTS 
NAMED TO HONOR CLUB 



Neiman's Batting Gives Dickinson 
4-3 Victory; Ford Bats .800; Gensel 
Hurls for Locals 



Bob Pritchard's diamond team lost 
their fifth game of the season last Sat- 
urday when they yielded to Dickinson 
College, 4-3 on the latters home 
grounfl. Johnny Gensel served the lo- 
cals on the mound; Hatter hurled for 
Dickinson. 

The game featured well played base- 
\ ball from start to finish. Susquehanna 
; jumped into an early lead of 3-2 which 
, they held until the ninth inning. Here 
| the Dickinson offense began to func- 
i tion as Neiman singled to center driv- 
i ing in the two runs which proved fatal 
I to Susquehanna. 

Outstanding in the day's perform- 
! ance were: Ford's powerful batting dis- 
{ play— he landed four safe blows out of 
j five trips to the place; Jack Neiman. 
whose batting won for Dickinson, and 
j John Gensel, who turned in a good 
j example of close pitching— he allowed 
! only seven hits during the entire nine 
innings. 

Statistics: 
Dickinson R H O A E 

| Neiman, 3b l l o 3 1 

I Wilson, c 1 6 1 

\ Keating, If, p 1 2 1 

j Rhodes, cf 3 

Lipson, 2b 1 2 

Bacon, lb 1 2 9 

Campbell, ss l 2 3 2 

Forgash, rf 

Hatter, p 1 

Thomas, If 1 1 4 



Last Saturday afternoon, the Motet 
Choir left the campus for its last con- 
cert trip of the season. The trip in- 
cluded concerts at Williamsburg, Som- 
erset, and Johnstown. Pa. 

The Williamsburg concert was given 
in the high school at 8:00 o'clock Sat- 
urday night. After a reception at the 
parsonage of the Lutheran Church 
which sponsored the concert, the choir 
members spent the night in private 
homes. 

At 3:00 p. m. on Sunday the group 
sang at the Lutheran Church in Som- 
erset. Several alumni were present at 
this concert as well as at the one in 
the Moxham Lutheran Church in 
Johnstown at 8:30 Sunday night. 

These three concerts were well at- 
tended by audiences who expressed the 
: same appreciation that the choir, un- 
der Prof. Frederick C. Stevens' direc- 
tion, has met throughout the season. 



From labor health, from health con- 
tentment springs. — Beattie. 

strand 

T 11 t 4 1 R f 
sunbury 



Totals 4 7 27 10 3 

Susquehanna R H O A E 

Isaacs, 3b l 2 

Klinger, cf 1 2 

Ford, 2b 4 2 4 

Kaltreider, ss 5 1 

Zeravica, c 1 3 1 

Schleig, rf 1 1 

Lewis, lb 13 

Zavarich, If 2 

Wolfe, If 

Gensel, p 1 1 3 



Totals 3 9*25 8 4 

*One out when winning run scored. 
Susquehanna ....00200100 0—3 
Dickinson 00100010 2 — 4 



-S- 



Necessary 

"Do I really need my coat brushed?" 
asked the passenger in the Pullman. 

"Does you!" exclaimed the porter 
with great emphasis. "Boss I'se broke!" 



1 Continued from Page 1) 
manager for "It Can't Happen Here," 
"First Lady," and "Criminal-at-Large." 
Blanche Forney — major roles as "Jud- 
ith Canfield" in "Stage Door," "Lor- 
inda Pike" in "It Can't Happen Here," 
and "Lucy Wayne" in "First Lady." 

Thirteen other students who had ful- 
filled the qualifications were elected to 
the Honors Club. They are: 

Elizabeth Brand : member of the pro- 
duction staff, "Stage Door;" property 
master "It Can't Happen Here" and 
"First Lady;" minor role, "Elaine," in 
"Parents and Pigtails." 

Lawrence Cady: electrician for 
"Stage Door," "It Can't Happen Here," 
"Parent and Pigtails," "First Lady," 
"Criminal-at-Large;" bit roles in "First 
Lady" and "Criminal-at-Large " 

Lois Davis: major role. "Irene Hib- 
bard" in "First Lady;" bit role in 
"There's Always Tomorrow." 

Nancy Griesemer: makeup assistant 
for "It Can't Happen Here" and "Par- 
ents and Pigtails;" major role, "Sophy 
Prescott," in "First Lady;" bit role, 
"Stage Door." 

Louise Mc Williams: major role, 
'Emmy Paige." in "First Lady;" major 
role, "Isla," in "Criminal-at-Large." 

Clyde Sechler: major role, "Carter 



Hibbard," in "First Lady." 

Sarah Williams: secondary role, 
"Little Mary," in "Stage Door;" major 
role, "Belle Hardwick," in "First Lady;"* 
major role, "Lady Lebanon," in "Crim- 
inal-at-Large." 

Forrest Heckert: secondary role, 
"Charles," in "First Lady;" major role, 
"Lord Lebanon," in "Criminal-at- 
Large." 

George MacQuesten: major role, 
"Sergeant Ferraby," in "Criminal-at- 
Large;" bit role, "Jason Fleming," in 
"First Lady." 

Helen Marie Edlund: business man- 
ager, "Parents and Pigtails" and "First 
Lady;" assistant stage manager, "Crim- 
inal-at-Large;" bit parts "Stage Door" 
and "Criminal-at-Large." 

H. Willard Sterrett, Jr.: staff work 
I "Stage Door" and "Parents and Pig- 
; tails;" technical director "It Can't 
Happen Here." 

The requirements for election to the 
Honors Club of the Theatre Guild cor- 
respond to those set up by the Alpha 
Psi Omega National Dramatics Fra- 
ternity for its chapters. Points are as- 
signed to various roles and duties on 
an objective quantitative basis provid- 
ed that the performance and work is 
1 satisfactory. According to the rating of 
roles and staff work employed for the 
selection at Susquehanna, one hun- 
dred points are necessary for member- 
ship. "High Honors" are granted to 
possessors of three hundred points or 
more, with at least fifty of those points 
for acting and at least fifty divided 
among other aspects of play produc- 
tion. 

Members of the Theatre Guild Hon- 
ors Club present at the Tuesday meet- 
ing were Faith Harbeson, Merle Hoover, 
Katherine Dietterle. Walter Freed, Karl 
Young, Charlotte Baish, Lila Barnes. 
Blanche Forney, Paul Shatto, Stanley 
Baxter, Philip Bergstresser, Grace 
Fries, Harold Mitman. William Nye, 
June Snyder, and William Troutman. 
Retroactive members of the club not 
in school are Shirley Finkbeiner with 
High Honors, James Diffenderfer, Rob- 
ert Critchfield, Francis Gelnett, John 
Hostetter, Miriam Miller. Mary Beth 
Richards, Margaret Roush, John Ulp, 
Reed Greninger, Kathryn Mayer. 
Katherine Porter, John Powell, Es- 
ther Kaufman, Mildred Pifer, Vane 
Mingle, Louise West, and Paul Cole- 
man. 



THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 

MAY 9, 10, 11 

Madeleine Carrol 

Bryan Aherne 

Louis Hayward 

"My Son, My Son" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
MAY 13 AND 14 

Merle Oberon 
George Brent 



U9 



Till We Meet 
Again" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MAY 15 AND 16 

Raymond Massey 

"Abe Lincoln In 
Illinois" 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • » 

FRIDAY, MAY 10 

Penny Singleton 
Arthur Lake 

"Blondie On A 
Budget" 

SATURDAY, MAY 11 

George O'Brien 
Virginia Vale 

"Bullet Code" 

MONDAY, MAY 13 

Sidney Toler 

"Charlie Chan In 
Panama" 

TUESDAY, MAY 14 

Basil Rathbone 
Boris Karloff 

"Tower of London" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MAY 15 AND lti 

Deanna Durbin 

Kay Francis 
Walter Pidgeon 

"It's A Date" 



Farmers National 
Bank 

Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are Interested in a Bigger 
SUSQUEHANNA 

and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 



Let 11s join hands in Making Thto 
Come True 



VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna. 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Typewriters 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The I fexalt Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELYNSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



325 Market St 
SUNBURY - 



- 706 Market St 
MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS. DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



DIAMONDS WATCHES 

Have Your Watch Repaired Now. 

No Watch Too Small. All 

Work Guaranteed. 

W. M. VALSING 

Jewe]*r Selinsgrove, Pa. 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 
Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



Watsontown Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 

AND 

PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa Paxtonville, Pa 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY. MAY 8. 1940 



Placement Bureau Fifth Band Festival 
Takes Great Strides Gets Wide Acclaim 



The Placement Bureau of Susque- 
hanna University !, a .s been greatly Im- 
proved tii is year. A new idea has been 
incorporated by the administration to 
make the bureau a more efficient and 
capable organization. 

A photographic plate containing the 
pictures of all the seniors who are 
eligible to teach this September has 
been printed. Vital information per- 
taining to each student is listed be- 
neath his or her picture together with 
the extra-curricular activities of each 
student. 

Five hundred of these plates are be- 
ing sent to a selected group of high 
school principals throughout the state 
of Pennsylvania. Each plate will be 
a accompanied by a mimeographed let- 
ter which will explain tire purpose and 
ject of the photographs. Each prin- 
cipal will have the opportunity to study 
the candidates from Susquehanna who 
satisfy the qualifications for the po- 
sition. This method is an attempt to 
make the work of the Placement Bu- 
reau a more personal contact through 
the me of the photographs. Each 
year the important pari that photo- 
graphs play in the modi 
"job-getting" Is becoming i 

Th' senioi ■ la s < I 'tis inno- 

vation one hundred per cent. It merits 
a you of recommendation for improved 
efficiency. 



em of 
e ap- 



Installation of Officers 
Of Pre-Theolojrfcal Club 

The activities of the Pre-Theoiogical 
club were terminated for tiie present 
school year by an inspirational meet- 
ing which was held at the home of 
Doctor and Mrs. Kretschmann on Fri- 
day evening. May 3. 

Following a series of games which 
were conducted by Reginald Schofield, 
Dr. Kretschmann delivered a short talk 
relative to the call to the ministry and 
the attitude which should prevail in 
the mind of every true pre-theolog. 

Doctor Kretschmann continued the 
meeting with the installation service in 
which the new officers were formally 
inducted for the coming year. 

The following officers were installed: 

Robert Booth, president; Eugene 
Smith, vice president : and Earl Mohn- 
ey, secretary-treasurer. 

The retiring officers for the present 
year were: 

J. Leon Haines, president, and John 
Gensel, secretary-treasurer. 

Each of the senior members of the 
club spoke briefly concerning the many 
benefits which they derived as active 
members of this organization. Each 
stated that be will go on to the theo- 
logical seminary with fond memories 
of the fellowship and stimulating as- 
sociations which were afforded them 
by the pre-ministeriaJ udents of Sus- 
quehanna. 

Refreshments were served and the 
meeting closed with the friendship 
circle and benediction pronounced by- 
Doctor Kretschmann. 



Climaxing three days of intensive 
band study, rehearsal, and clinic was 
the Grand Concert by one hundred 
forty one high school musicians in the 
fifth annual All-Master Band Festival 
held in the Alumni Gym on Susque- 
hanna's campus Saturday evening. Dr. 
Frank Simon, conductor of the Armco 
Band and director of the band depart- 
ment of the Cincinnati Conservatory 
of Music, was guest conductor; and 
Leona May Smith was guest soloist. 
Elrose L. Allison of the Susquehanna 
Conservatory of Music was the resi- 
dent conductor; and Donald M. Luck- 
enbill and Samuel B. Kurtz were hon- 
ored high school conductors. 

Dr. G. Morris Smith welcomed the 
capacity audience on behalf of the 
university, and George Anderson gave 
the response. 

The program: 

I. 

1. a. Rienzie Overture Wagner 

b. Sleepers Wake Bach 

(Conducted by Elrose L. Allison) 

2. a. Blue Danube Waltz Strauss 

b. Slumber Song 

C. Plight of the Bumble-Bee— Rims- 
ky-Korsakov 
(Cornet solos by Leona May Smith, 
accompanied by George Seuffert, Jr.. 
conducted by Elrose L. Allison.) 

3. Sursum Corda Elgar 

'Conducted by Donald Luckenbill. sup- 
ervisor of music, Freeland and West 
Hazletoru 

4. Introduction to Act III of Lohen- 

grin Wagner 

Conducted by Samuel Kurtz, super- 
visor of music, Bloomsburg.i 

5. Largo Handel 

(Cornet solo by Leona May Smith, ac- 
companied by George Seuffert. Jr.. 
conducted by Elrose L. Allison.) 

Address— William O. Roberts, super- 
visor of Music, Wilkes-Barre) 
II 



Sun bury Pupils Give 
Musical Program 



The Ladies Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University was well entertained at the 
Saturday afternoon meeting by mem- 
beri of the Sunbury Junior High 
School. An interesting program of 
musical numbers, including both solos 
and the (iiils Sextette, was furnished. 

Outstanding OH the program was the 
trumpet solo by Allen Flock and the 
trombone solo by Cleveland Reita, both 
ot whom ire state music contest win- 
ners. 

a tine performance was ;i i:o given by 

the Girls Sextette. Members of the 
Sextette include Marian Lawrence. 
Mar.iorie Sherry, Louise Lloyd. Helen 
Smith, Winlield Snyder, and Emma 
Jane L«-pley. 

Jean Farley and Reinold Wolf de- 
• the hearty applause they recened 
for the talent they showed m violin 
and baritone solos, respectively 

The Ladies Auxiliary lias Katherine 

Reed and Martha Fisher to thank for 

arranging the splendid entertainment 

they received at the meeting Saturday 

moan In Befberl Hall. 



Conducted by Frank Simon 

Cariolan Overture Beethoven 

Unfinished Symphony, First move- 
ment Schubert 

Bride Elect Sousa 

Semper Fidelis Sousa 

Manhattan Beach Sousa 

Cincinnati Post Simon 

After playing the second Sousa piece 
on the program, Semper Fidelis, which 
was enthusiastically received, Dr. Si- 
mon told the student orchestra and the 
audience of his connection with the 
composer. 

•Every nation in the world would be 
proud to own a bandwriter like the 
greatest of all. John Philip Sousa. He 
ranks as March King, comparable to 
Strauss in the Waltz field. It was a 
privilege and proud part of my life 
that I was a member of his band for 
seven years." 

He agreed with William O. Roberts, 
the intermission speaker, and said, 
"For the last fifteen to eighteen years 
there has been a constant growth of 
educational music. It was really start- 
ed by a music that made itself plea* 
sunt, though uninvited— a new. sen- 
suous music from the jungle, given the 
magnificent title. 'Jazz.' I still main- 
tain that jazz is music for the feet." 

"The educators of the country rea- 
lized that something must be done to 
combat this trend. Therefore, to bring 
back good music, we set about preach- 
ini! the benfits of this great work. At 
lust it was not easy— but now schools 
all over the country see light. 

This work is purely character build- 
ing. We don't hope to make profession- 
als. . . We are occupied in instructive 
and constructive uplifting activity. . . 
These young musicians have learned 



iluable lessons: cooperation. 
i • not to play and when to play. . . 
I : have learned that the success:-; of 
any enterprise depends on each one 
doing his work in the best possible 
manner." 

Dr. Simon referred to the recommen- 
dation of G-Man J. Edgar Hoover 
made to the city fathers of Cleveland 
When youthful crime waves became 
prevalent— to keep those youth occu- 
pied with worthwhile activity in their 
leisure time. 

"What are we going to do with all 
the musicians? What do we do with 
all the readers? The writers? Music 
is just a part of the well-rounded mod- 
ern education, building character and 
citizenship." 

Intermission commentator William 
O. Roberts, supervisor of music at 
Wilkes-Barre, graduate of Susque- 
hanna. 1928. spoke on the benefit 
and effect of music on the youth, em- 
phasizing citizenship. 

Then, mentioning Sousa and Simon, 
American composers, Mr. Roberts de- 
clared, "America is possibly the last 
stand of human culture. ... An edu- 
cated man is known by the life he 
lives; a country is known by the lives 
the people in it live." 

Before the soloist, Leona May Smith, 
played her third concert number, 
Riiiisky-Korsakov's "The Flight of the 
Bumblebee," her accompanist and hus- 
band. George Seuffert, Jr., related how 
his wife played the piece at first when 
they both were connected with the 
band of Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman 
in New York, and he. Mr. Seuffert. 
declaring himself bored with the typi- 
cal concert piece for the cornetist, wag- 
ered Miss Smith she couldn't play "The 
Flight of the Bumblebee." She won the 
wager and Mr. Seuffert lost his bach- 
elorhood. 

The one hundred forty one music- 
ians selected from the twenty-six 
bands participating in the All-Master 
Band Festival Concert arrived on cam- 
pus Thursday afternoon. After a two 
o'clock registration rehearsals began 
at three, and continued that evening, 
Friday night with Miss Smith, the 
soloist, and Saturday morning with Dr. 
Simon. The band masters clinic was 
held at 1:45 Saturday afternoon. Dr. 
Simon lecture on "Simonizing the 
Band" and Miss Smith on "The Effec- 
tive Playing of the Cornet." 

At three o'clock the Pottsville high 
school band and the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity bands paraded in mass drill 
maneuvers on the Athletic Field. The 
Pottsville band formed a "Hello" and 
later, an "S. U." for the host. Leader 
Leo Minichbach was applauded by the 
grandstand. The the Susquehanna 
band paraded, forming an "F" for Fes- 
tival, and an "S. U." also. 

The two bands formed in front of 
the speaker's stand and Dr. Simon lead 
them in "Our Director" march. 

The Pottsville band was the only 
complete high school band at the Fes- 



tival, having been specially invited by 
the Festival authorities. The band rais- 
ed expense money anion:' its own mem- 
bers. 

After the drills. Dr. Simon was in- 
vited to and accordingly did conduct 
the University band in the gym play- 
ing "II Guarany." Joseph Pasterchik 
piesented the conductor with a written 
invitation to become a lifelong mem- 
ber and honorary conductor of the 
band. Miss Smith spoke a few words 
of greeting, and then Joseph Paster- 
chik presented her with an invitation, 
in recognition of her outstanding abil- 
ity on the cornet, to become a lifelong 
member of the band. 

The committee in charge of arrange- 
ments for the Fifth Annual All-Master 
Band Festival consisted of resident 
conductor, Elrose L. Allison; business 
manager. Dr. Sheldon; assistant busi- 
ness manager, Prof. Linebaugh; comp- 
troller. Mr. Yorty; librarian, Joseph 
Pasterchik; and secretary. Elaine Mill- 
er. 

S 

GALT MAKES AWARDS 
OF SCHOLASTIC CUPS 



REX ROCKWELL TO PLAY; 
BOBBIE O'CONNER TO SING 
AT GALA EVENT BY JUNIORS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
during the opening half of the occas- 
ion. 

The committee responsible for the 
selection of the orchestra is in charge 
of Clyde Sechler who was assisted by 
I Ken Bonsall, Eleanor Smith, and Eliza- 
beth Reese. The ticket committee is 
headed by Harry Thatcher, who is aid- 
■ ed by Elaine Miller, Karl Young, and 
Douglas Portzline. Lois Beamenderf- 
er is chairman of the program commit- 
tee and is assisted by Jim McCord, 
! "Flo" Reitz, and Harriet Mendenhall. 
George Bantley is serving as the head 
of the decorations committee and is 
being assisted by Elsie Hochella, Rob- 
• ert Booth, Sam Fletcher, Marion 
I Crompton, Lois Davis, Esther Seitzing- 
i er, Melissa Smoot. Naomi Himes, and 
' Paul Shatto. Earl Deardorf heads the 
i furniture committee and is assisted by 
Melvin Jones, Joe Greco, and Willard 
Schadel. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
second cup which has been offered by 
the Inter-Fraternities; the first was 
won three years successively by Beta 
Kappa, which also won the present 
cup last year. 

It is the purpose of the school in the 
future to make the observance of Aca- 
| demic Recognition Day a more aus- 
I picious occasion. 

. s 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



W. A. A. TO SPONSOR 
MAY DAY EVENTS 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
i Louise McWiiliams an archery drill, 
I a Morris handkerchief dance, a scarf 
/ dance, and a may pole dance. The 
contests between the suitors for the 
May Queen's hand are four in num- 
Iber; archery, racing, wrestling, and 
' soccer. 

The May Day exercises are spon- 
sored by the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERING AND 

INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



RAUCH'S B s A „ R oT 

Sanitary Service 



ONE PRICE FOR 

All 
Week 



Hair Cuts 



25c 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL CAFE 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Sellnsgrove, Pa. 




SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Wait 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
FREE 

Shoe Shine Parlor 

NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Full Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



Very Probable 

Policeman (to tramp sitting on top 
oj oak tree) "Hey! v.h.u are you do- 
lug up there?" 

iMinp: "i don'l know; I most have 
sat on an acorn." 



BRESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

N*Xl To RHchley's 
SHOE SHINE 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WIIERi: STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthorn 



Markley-Altvater 

MENS AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL. PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B., B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith. A.M., DD., Prea 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 






Highlights 
Of the Week 



Track Team at Dickinson 

With one win and two defeats on 
their record so far this season, Coach 
Stagg's tracksters travel to Dickinson 
this afternoon, where they will meet 
Coach Kahler's track and field team. 

Baseball Team at Rutgers 

After clashing with the Upsala nine 
yesterday at East Orange, Coach "Bob" 
Pritchard takes his diamond forces to 
New Brunswick, where they will face 
the strong Rutgers nine this afternoon. 

W. A. A. Banquet Tomorrow 

The Women's Athletic Association 
will hold its annual spring banquet to- 
morrow evening at 6:15. The athletic 
awards for the year will be announced 
at this meeting. 

Albright Tennis Team Here 

Susquehanna will play host to the 
Albright tennis team on the local 
courts on Friday afternoon. 

Guild to Present "Criminal At Large" 

On Friday evening at 8:15 p. m. the 
Susquehanna Players will present their 
final production of the year, "Criminal 
at Large" in Seibert auditorium. A 
second performance of the play will 
be given on Saturday, May 1, at 8:00 
p. m. 

Baseball Team at Moravian 

The Susquehanna diamond team will 
go to Moravian Saturday, where they 
hope to defeat the Greyhounds for the 
second time this season. 

Tennis Team to Meet Bucknell 

The tennis team will meet Bucknell 
on the Susquehanna courts on Sat- 
urday afternoon; in an earlier match 
Susquehanna lost to Bucknell 8-1. 

High School Runners Here 

Susquehanna will be host to dele- 
gations of track and field men from 
high schools throughout this section 
of the state for the annual A. A. U. 
eliminations to be held here Saturday. 

Senior Recitals Monday and Tuesday 

The annual Senior Recital given by 
seniors in the Conseravtory of Music 
will be. presented in Seibert Auditor- 
ium on'Monday and Tuesday evenings 
at 8:15 p. m. 

Biemic Society to Meet Tuesday 

The Biemic Society will meet in 
Steele Science next Tuesday evening 
at 6:45 o'clock. 

Track Meet at Albright 

The Crusader track team will engage 
its fifth foe of the season next Tues- 
day afternoon when it opposes the Al- 
bright runners on the latter's course 
at Reading. 

Baseball Team at Penn State 

Nearing the close of the season the 
Pritchard diamond contingent will face 
its strongest foe when it travels tc 
State College to meet the Lions next 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Final Exams Begin Thursday 

The final examinations for the Sec- 
ond Semester will begin next Thursday 
at 9 o'clock and will continue through 
Friday, May 31. The temporary sched- 
ule of examinations is given on page 
four. 

One More Issue 

The Susquehanna will cease publica- 
tion for the school year after the ap- 
pearance of the next issue on May 22. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXXXVII. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY. MAY 15. 1940 



Number 5 



Crowned Queen of May Capacity Crowd Here THEATRE GUILD TO PRESENT MYSTERY 

Sub-Freshman Day DRAMA "CRIMINAL AT LARGE", FRIDAY 




Over 225 High School Seniors and 
Parents See Susquehanna in Action; 
Some Students Enroll. 



May Queen Feted at 
Colorful Coronation 



Radiant Queen Madalcne Is Crowned 
by Fair Ann; Merry Englanders Rev- 
el on Gay Spring Day 



May Day dawned bright and clear, 
and was eagerly awaited by the anx- 
ious and eager girls of Seibert Hall. 
The dormitory was wide awake by 6:30 
a. m., Saturday morning; the long 
awaited day had finally arrived, and 
no one was going to waste any precious 
time. 

The day's activities began with the 
traditional May Day breakfast in hon- 
or of the May Queen and her court. 
Breakfast was certainly a gala occas- 
ion, with a royal welcome to all the 
girls and particularly to the May 
Court. Miss Shure to whom we owe 
the greatest part of the success of our 
May Day, recited a very lovely, and 
appropriate poem which we believe she 
very skillfully composed herself. She 
toasted the lovely Queen and her 
court, and then the Queen and Lady- 
in-Waiting made very short but sweet 
speeches. The Court's table was very 
prettily decorated with spring flowers, 
and each member of the court found a 
lovely corsage at her place at the table. 

The real doings commenced at 2 p. 
m. when all our guests had congregat- 
ed on the grounds across from the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Reitz Made Head of 
Business Society 

At the regular meeting of the Busi- 
ness Society on Tuesday evening, the 
officers for the ensuing year were 
elected. They are: President, Florence 
Reitz: Vice President, Maxine Heef- 
ner; Secretary, Frank Corcoran; Trea- 
surer, Naomi Himes. 

Previous to the business meeting a 
moving picture was presented to the 

I group entitled "America Marching 
On." In it was depicted the history of 

i industry in America which began with 
the small grist mill and developed into 

! the Big Business organizations of the 
present day. The progress of Ameri- 
can life is often surveyed by the efforts 

! put forth by industry to improve it- 
self. The picture proved to be prac- 
tical to all those who attended. 



Kaufman Chosen to 
Lead Sophomores 



At a special meeting of the Sopho- 
more class, called to order by president 
Martin Hopkins on Wednesday, May 8, 
August Kaufman was elected president 
for the coming year. 

The first duty of the new officers is 
to serve on an electoral committee for 
the purpose of selecting those who will 
administer the publication of the 1942 
Lanthorn. The Junior prom will also 
be handled by the newly elected offi- 
cers next year. 

Ballots were cast in favor of the fol- 
lowing : 

August Kaufman president 

Neil Fisher vice president 

Sara Williams secretary 

Blair Heaton treasurer 

The retiring officers of the sopho- 
more class are: 

Martin Hopkins president 

Lila Barnes vice president 

August Kaufman secretary 

Blair Heaton treasurer 



Twelve Players Climax 
College Stage Career 

"Criminal at Large", the last pro- 
duction of the Susquehanna Univer- 
sity Theatre Guild for the college year, 
is also the last play in which many 
Theatre Guild members will partici- 
pate. 

Faculty Advisor Mr. James C. Free- 
man will take a leave of absence for 
the coming year, during which time 
he expects to finish his residence work 
at Boston University where he is filling 
the requirements for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in English. He 
will also serve as a graduate assistant 
on the B. U. faculty. 

The following students say goodbye 
to Susquehanna classwork after gradu- 
ation, and accordingly for them "Crim- 
inal at Large" is their last participat- 
ing production: Grace Fries, Marie 
Edlund, Elizabeth Albury, Ruth Farley, 
Mary Catherine Mack, William Nye, 
Donald Critchfleld, Kenneth Kinney, 
Burton Richards, John Schleig, and 
Eugene Williams. 

In addition to those announced last 
week, George Spiggle and Pierce Allen 
Coryell are qualified for membership 
in the Susquehanna Theatre Guild 
Honors Club. 



More than 225 high school students 
were entertained as sub-freshmen by 
Susquehanna University on Saturday, 
May 11. This first annual Sub-Fresh- 
man Day was made possible by the 
combined efforts of students, admin- 
istration, and the Alumni Association. 
The latter was most active in bringing 
good prospective college material to 
the campus. 

The sub-freshmen, many of whom 
were accompanied by alumni who per- 
sonally brought them to Susquehanna, 
began their visit with a tour of the 
various college departments. Susque- 
hanna students acted as guides, and 
took them to the science laboratories; 
to station W8T1W; to the commercial 
department for demonstration of bus- 
iness machines; and to the Conserva- 
tory of Music. 

The 11:30 chapel service opened with 
the singing of the Doxology, followed 1 
by greetings from President G. Morris 
Smith and from Calvin V. Erdly '20 
who is superintendent of schools at 
Lewistown. The Motet Choir presented 
several of their best-liked selections. 
Three alumni sang with them— Jo- 
sephine Carey, Shirley Finkbeiner, and 
Virginia Straub, all of the class of '39. 
President Smith closed the service with 
an address in which he urged the sub- 
freshmen to prepare themselves for 
their life-work. He stated that today 
we are facing graver problems than 
have ever been faced in the last hund- 
red years, and that one of these is un- 
employment. Quoting from a recent 
survey, he said that there are 12,000 
positions in Pennsylvania which are 
unfilled merely because the employers 
cannot find anyone sufficiently pre- 
pared. Dr. Smith outlined the various 
departments in which Susquehanna 
University prepares students for fu- 
ture work. 

Dinner was served in Horton Dining 
Hall and was followed by a concert 
before Seibert Hall by the Susquehan- 
na University Band. 

The sub-freshmen also attended the 
May Day festivities at the rock garden 
at 2:00 p. m. and later witnessed either 
the track meet with American Univer- 
sity or the tennis matches with Juni- 
, ata College, both of which were won 
by Susquehanna. 

Sub-Freshman Day was adjudged a 
definite success for it accomplished 
perfectly its end— that of acquainting 
good college material with what Sus- 
quehanna has to offer prospective stud- ! 
ents. 

Phi Mu Deita^Elects 

Young to Presidency 

i 

The Mu Alpha Chapter of Phi Mu I 
Delta held their elections for fratern- i 
ity offices, May 8. 1940. 

Karl Young will occupy the presi- 
dent's chair, James McCord will as- 
sume the comptroller's duties. Albert 
Knapp was chosen secretary, and John 
Jones was elected Sergeant-at-Arms. 
Sanford Blough will be the editor of 
the house periodical. 



Heckert, Williams, Shatto, and Williamson fco 
Head Cast; Latest Lighting Equipment to be 
Used in Production 



To Play in Mystery 



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LOUISE Mc WILLIAMS (left) 
SARA WILLIAMS (right) 



Program Released 
For Commencement 



Dr. Bagger, and President Corson 
Will Deliver Addresses; S. C. A. to 
Hold David Day Hill Top Service 

• 



"Criminal at Large", featuring Louise 
McWilliams as a frightened young lady 
and Sara Williams as a determined 
mother, will be presented by the Sus- 
quehanna Theatre Guild this coming 
Friday evening and Alumni Day. June 
1st, in Seibert Hall Chapel at eight- 
fifteen. The play, by Edgar Wallace, 
is a mystery drama of disappearance 
and murder. 

Sara Williams as Lady Lebanon, por- 
trays an English lady of the old school, 
to whom the right devices on the fam- 
ily crest are more important than the 
murder of the family physician not 
so far from the front door. She has 
concentrated all her efforts on getting; 
her son, Lord Lebanon, Forrest Heck- 
ert, a blockhead of the new school, 
married to his cousin Isla, played by 
Louise McWilliams. The idea, as far as 
Lady Lebanon is concerned, is to per- 
petuate the Lebanons. Both Isla and 
Lord Lebanon have other ideas. 

The situation becoming foul with 
murder. Lord Lebanon secretly, he 
dcesn't want his mother to know, goe.s 
to Scotland Yard for help. He asks 
Chief Inspector Tanner, Paul Shatto, 
who has one of the leading roles In 
the play, to come down and unravel 
the mystery. Inspector Tanner is in- 
clined to laugh it off, as is his best 



Susquehanna University will observe 
its eighty-second annual Commence- I friend Sergeant Totty, George Spiggle, 
ment Week beginning Friday, May 31, ; who, by his own account, would have 
through Monday, June 3. Final plans j been chief inspector himself except 
are now being completed for the exer- | that Queen Elizabeth wasn't born the 
cises at which about eighty seniors year he'd written on the examination 
from the Liberal Arts, the Business blank. The laugh rebounds when Lord 
Administration, the Commercial and Lebanon's footman. Gilder, William 
Music departments will receive their j Nye, is found eavesdropping behind the 
diplomas. J door. 

Dr. G. Morris Smith has announced l When another murder is committed 
that the general program for the week a t Lor d Lebanon's home, Scotland Yard 
will be as follows: in the persons of Inspector Tanner and 

Friday will be devoted to the gradu- Secants Totty and Ferraby descend 
ating class who will conduct their spe- on the scene - Sergeant Ferraby, George 
cial exercises on the law.n and Louis Mc Q u e st -en- has a more than platonic 



Sanders Installs New 
S.C.A. Cabinet Members 



Baylor, president, will make the pre- 
sentation of the class gift to the 
school. After this, President and Mrs. 
G. Morris Smith will entertain the 
members of the class at a luncheon at 
the Susquehanna Valley Country Club. 
In the evening the fraternities will 
hold their Commencement parties, 

Saturday is Alumni Day with a 
luncheon and business meeting at 
noon, followed with class reunions and 
informal sports. Later in the after- 
noon the President's reception will be 
held on Pine Lawn to which all Sen- 
iors and their parents are cordially in- 
vited. 

At 5:45 in Horton Dining Hall the 
seniors will be the guests of the Alumni 
at a banquet where they will be offi- 
cially presented to the Alumni Asso 
ciation. In the evening the Theatre 
Guild will present Edgar Wallace's 
"Criminal At Large" in Seibert Chapel. 

Sunday morning the Academic pro- 
cession will form at Selinsgrove Hall 
and march to Trinity Lutheran Church 
where the Baccalaureate Service will 
be 

ger, D.D., president of the Pittsburgl 
Synod, will deliver the sermon. 

The Student Christian Association 
will conduct a brief but very inspiring 
(Continued on Page 3) 
S 

Nancy (iriesemer Made 
Editor of '42 Lanthorn 



love for Isla. 

The scene contains several suspects. 
For example, there are Gilder who 
was behind the Scotland Yard door, 
and his fellow servant Brooks, Stanley 
Baxter, who are much too husky and 
much too American and much too 
bossy to be mere servants. There's 
Lady Lebanon who makes a habit of 
giving her son blank checks to sign, 
There's Isla, so nervous she walks in 
her sleep, talking as she does of .-car- 
ves, the kind found tightly around the 
necks of the strangled murder victims. 
There's Kelver, the housekeeper, Mary 
Emma Yoder, who is seemingly anxious 
to leave Lady Lebanon's service before 
her reputation as a servant will be sul- 
lied by the murders. There's Rawbane 
Margaret Chamberlain, an authority 
on ancient crests who is striving to 
please Lady Lebanon m the arrange- 
ment of the Lebanon coat of arms and 
\vh<> li very upset over the murder of 
a chauffeur and a doctor she evidently 
(Concluded on Page 4> 



held. The Reverend Henry H. Bag- jtl&IlV A 1 1J HI II 1 RpfllTII 

. D.D.. president of the Pittsburgh AT ****V «*«■■■*■■ miUI II 

Sab-Freshman Day 



The new cabinet members of the 
Student Christian Association were in- 
stalled on Thursday morning, May 9, 
by Robert Sander, past president. Mr. 
Sander used the installation service 
suggested by the L. S. A. A. of which 
the local S. C. A. is a part. 

Those installed were President, 
Elaine Miller; Boys' President, Blair 
Heaton; Girls' President. Florence 
Reitz; Treasurer. Harold Mitman; Re- 
cording Secretary, Evelyn Williamson; 
Corresponding secretary, Mary Emma 
Yoder; Co-chairmen of Freshmen Ac- 
tivities, Paul Shoemaker and Cornelia 
Grothe; World Fellowship. Martin j 
Hopkins; Handbook, Harry Thatcher; , 
Membership Chairman, Forrest Heck- I 
ert; Student Church, Merle Hoover; 
Vespers, Miriam Unangst ; Chapel, l 
Kathe Hansen; Social Chairman, Jack 
Walsh. 



The election for the 1941 Lanthorn 
staff took place yesterday afternoon. 
An electoral committee consisting of 
the Junior president, secretary, and the 
faculty advisors chose Nancy Griese- 
mer as editor-in-chief and Sanford 
Blough as business manager. 

Assistant editors appointed are 
Louise McWilliams and Betty Rene 
Smith; assistant business managers are 
Jack Walsh and Rex Sunday. 



NOTICE TO SOPHOMORES 

All sophomores in the Liberal 
Arts Department should call at the 
registrar's office within the next 
week and report their majors and 
minors to Mrs. Ulrich. In case of 
any doubt about this matter, the 
individual should consult his facul- 
ty advisor. 



Sub-Freshman Da\ was almo-' 
much Of an attraction for alumi.. 
for prospective students. Some forty 
former students wowed our mi- 
M they strolled around the campus 
among the other guests. 

Rev. Oscar Feeinan. It!, trom Mil- 
heim, holds the distinction of bi . 
ing the largest number of itudi 
twelve. Lewistown. however, with a 
group of eleven students was a < 
rival in numbers. 

Eight students trom Hanover were 
added to the crowd of sub-freshmen b\ 
Henry Shafer. '37. Hanover tench.':, 
and by Rev William Janson, President 
ol the Hanover Alumni Club 

John Hanna, '35. Northumberhm d 
football coach, was accompanied bv 
four husky, nthletic-lookiiu; boys from 
his school, possibly future football 
playeri like Hanna. Hob Bastrcs, '39. 
another football hem ftj 
four years at Susquehanna Mill | 
ed Lois Yost, act! .,.-. ughtr, to 

show him around. 

The class of '38 broudit back such 
"Continued on Pftfc 4> 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHAN NA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving. Christ- 
mas. Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters; Margaret Grenoble. "40; Anne Hill, "40; Virginia Mann. '40; G. Rob- 
ert Booth. '41; Miriam Garner. '41; Merle Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; 
Eleanor Smith. '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; Blair Heaton, '42; 
Ruth Schwenk. '42; Willard Sterrett, *42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor- 
yell. '43; Mary Cox, '43; Ella Fetherolf, '43; Charles Gundrum, '43; Dan 
MacCartney. '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson. '43. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Advertising Manager Paul Shoemaker 

Business Assistants: Delphine Hoover. Robert MacQuesten, Stanley Stonesifer, 

Rex Sunday, Frank Morgan, Dorothy Weder, Frank Corcoran. 
Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. 

WEDNESDAY. MAY 15, 1940 

PREPARE NOW FOR FINALS ! 

In just six school days the semester final examinations will 
begin. For some professors the final examinations count very 
little; for others they count very materially. In many cases, the 
final classifying of the student's grade into A, B, D, or F awaits 
the return from the semester final. 

If the student is to do his very best on these finals, he must 
begin to review several days before the "exam" takes place, oth- 
erwise he will be unable to cover the great bulk of material with 
any thoroughness. Of course, those who have neglected to do 
their daily work with proper diligence should work especially 
hard for this "last reckoning." 

But all this discussion and controversy about grades is sup- 
erficial, indeed, when compared with the real purpose in edu- 
cation. Whether it be a subject of the social science group in 
which general understanding is more important than factual 
detail or an exact physical science in which attention must be 
paid to the smallest detail, the same rule of learning applies — 
that one realizes additional value from the material as he is 
exposed to it at varied intervals. This is the chief reason for 
giving examinations — to force students to review. 

Why not begin intensive review work now rather than 
next Wednesday night? It's the smart thing to do, both from 
the standpoint of grades and of better mastery of the subject 
matter covered during the semester. 
WHY NOT MORE COOPERATIVE DANCES? 

The suggestion has been made from several different quar- 
ters that the dances at Susquehanna could be greatly improved 
if the fraternities and sororities would pool their resources for 
more such events. We agree with this idea and should like to 
see it carried out. 

The motive back of such a step is based upon the simple 
truth that in unity there is strength. The sororities have follow- 
ed this plan and have found it successful; now that better spirit 
between the fraternities has been achieved, there is no reason 
why it cannot work here, also. 

Under the present system there are at least three dances 
held at the individual houses each yar. All of these, with the 
possible exception of the Homecoming Dances, could be held 
in the gym as inter-fraternity affairs. This would remove the 
problem of congestion now faced by each of the fraternities; 
it would, at the same time, make possible the securing of a much 
better orchestra than can be afforded by any group separately. 

We would also suggest that all sororities and fraternities 
combine for one dance each year. This combination would have 
the support of more than half of the entire student body — ac- 
cording to the 1941 Lanthorn two hundred thirty-four students 
are either pledges or members of one of the six social groups. 
With the guaranteed support of a group like this, such a dance 
could be made much larger and better than any we now have. 

Why not cooperate in this matter? Begin action through 
the Fraternity Senate and the Inter-Sorority Council. By do- 
ing so we can enjoy better dances at the same or smaller costs. 
CONGRATULATIONS 

After experiencing the excellent way in which every indi- 
vidual and group cooperated to make Sub-Freshman Day a suc- 
cess, we feel that we should say congratulations for a job well 
done. The success of the event stands as a tribute to all those 
who contributed whether in small or large capacity. 

We would laud the alumni on two scores: not only did they 
start anew the policy of observing sub-freshman day — they also 
did the actual work of bringing the high school seniors to the 
campus. 

The 'K'ministration and faculty did a fine job in arranging 
such a well-balanced program and in carrying out the events 
of the day without having past custom or tradition to refer to 
ior ideas. As the years go on, discoveries will be made and new 
ideas will be developed which will make for an even more suc- 
cessful day. 

But the picture would not be complete without putting into 
words the fine cooperation given to this event by the sudent 
body. Not only did the students participate in the events of 
the day. but they showed that friendly spirit for which Suscme- 
hann.a Is noted. Many lavorable comments were made by our 
guests along the line, 



Junior Prom Pronounced Success Con Students Please 
With Rex Rockwell at the Baton Audience In Recital 



Climaxing a day of glory and 
triumph for Susquehanna the class of 
1941 presented the most successful 
Junior Prom in many a year in the 
Alumni Gym last Saturday evening. 

Outside the sky was bright with star- 
light while inside in contrast to this 
the gym was dimmed with the glow of 
large blue lanterns. Spring blossoms, 
little bird houses, and the heavy fra- 
grance from the girls' corsages made 
everyone feel as though spring had 
really come to oblige the Juniors on 
this, their big night. Rex Rockwell 
and his orchestra played both swing 
and smooth numbers in order to please 
both the jitterbugs and the waltzers. 
Bobbie O'Conner, the orchestra's ten- 
or, added a lot to the band, especially 
when he sang his renditions of Star- 
dust and For You. 

Aside from all the happy student 
couples we were very glad to see such 
a large group of alumni back. Among 
the alumni were Alverna Reese, Perky 
Finkbeiner, Eleanor Croft, Kent 
Worthington, Esther Yingling, Horace 
Hutchison, Anna Mease, Louise West, 
Verna Gayman, Mary Appier, Isabel 
Tewksbury, Miriam Miller, Eleanor Sa- 



veri, and Frank Laudenslager. 

We cannot forget to mention some 
of the former students of Susquehanna 
who came back to spend the week- 
end with their former friends. Among 
these we can mention Bob Konkle, 
Jack Reichard, Jane Wormley, Roy 
Shaulis, Fred Lukens, Nels Dennis, and 
Betty and Henry Luhring. 

Right before intermission the tra- 
ditional Grand Promenade took place 
and was led by the Junior Class Presi- 
dent, Don Ford and Jean Beamenderf- 
er. The May Queen, Madalene Hayes, 
and her court along with their escorts 
were again honored by following the 
President. 

The chaperones, Dr. and Mrs. Smith, 
Dr. and Mrs. Russ, Dr. and Mrs. Gait, 
Dr. and Mrs. Houtz, Prof, and Mrs. 
Linebaugh, Mr. and Mrs. Stagg, and 
Miss Barbara Kruger, seemed to be as 
much in the mood as the students. 

At midnight the band stopped play- 
ing and the couples slowly left the gym 
feeling that they had spent one of 
their most wonderful evenings and 
hoping that they would have the same 
opportunity again. The Juniors surely 
put it over this year. 



"TO MUSE OR AMUSE" 



This mulling over a few facts that 
everyone knows can become very dis- 
couraging after a while. Oh, yes, there 
is a lot of material at hand, but it in- 
variably turns out that the best ma- 
terial is either slightly unprintable or 
concerns someone who is a close 
enough friend to have a highly un- 
comfortable doghouse. And then there 
is always the Censor against whom the 
columnist usually plays a losing game. 
Lamentable, isn't it? 

For instance, who didn't know that 
Essie Seitzinger was away over the 
week-end — to Herndon, no less. And 
what is more, they say that he is going 
to be here for the Commencement 
dances, too. 

Almost everyone attended May Day, 
of course, and knows all about the 
lovely court, the comparatively good 
May Day weather, and the show that 
was put on by Clyde Sechler individ- 
ually, not to mention the other excel- 
lent entertainers. Clyde, we hear, was 
quite worn out from his efforts on Sat- 
urday. Any of the sub-freshmen who 
come here to school next year will be 
expecting him to live up to quite a 
reputation. 

Perhaps everyone doesn't know about 
Ed Sivick's trip to the fortune teller 
and her forecast for him in the way of 
wives. See Ed or Bill Nye for parti- 
culars. 

Poor Joe Baxter is having quite a 
time. He has announced that he can't 
be in the play because he has nothing 
to w-ear. Any donations would be grate- 
fully accepted. It might be well to 
caution those who are going to attend 
the play to be on the alert for a scream 
from Miss Mc Williams that is louder 
and more bloodcurdling than any that 



has ever been screamed on the Seibert 
Hall stage. The cast and others con- 
nected with the play guarantee that 
anyone who doesnt jump at least one 
half a foot has seen too many mysterj 
plays. 

It seems that we got away from May 
Day back there but here we are again. 
It certainly was a relief to see Peg and 
Bing coming from the post office Sat- 
urday morning — with their gowns. It 
was almost necessary to carry out some 
wag's idea about calling up "Life" to 
come to Susquehanna to take pictures 
of a unique May Court— one without 
dresses. 

From all reports the May Queen 
looked happier at the dance than any- 
one else — as she should have. Elaine 
Miller ran a close second with her 
Clark from Syracuse here. Snookie, as 
per usual, looked very lovely as did 
some of the imports — notably Miss 
Jane Schnure of New York City. 

There has been some wonder ex- 
pressed on campus about Beamender- 
fer's interest in family budgets in the 
last week. Hmmmm. And then there is 
Ed Rogers whom we might caution as 
to where some of the campus roads 
lead. There are a couple dead ends, or 
did you know that? 

The Motet is back on campus for 
good we guess after a highly success- 
ful trip to the west of Pennsylvania, 
We bet that Reed Gulick is glad to 
have them back— after all those post 
cards do get heavy. 

Has McCord bee behaving himself 
lately? It seems strange but I haven't 
heard of any missteps from him in a 
long time. Have you? Any information 
would be appreciated. 

S 



According to many comments by 
faculty and students the most inter- 
esting recital of the year was present- 
ed last Thursday evening, May 9, by 
the students of the Conservatory of 
Music. It featured violin, trumpet, and 
vocal solos in addition to the fine piano 
and organ numbers. The highlight of 
the evening was the group of songs 
given by the chorus class. Miss Fish 
directed the chorus in two songs by 
contemporary composers. These songs 
were rich in interpretation which was 
aided by the exotic harmonies. The 
final number was a humorous Tennes- 
see mountain song sung in the true 
spirit. The program follows: 

1. Organ— Laudate Domini . Frysinger 

Miss Blanche Forney 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

2. Song— To the Queen of Heaven — T. 

F. Dunhill 

Miss Janet Shockey 
Stoyestown, Pa. 

3. Song— One Who Has Yearn'd Alone 

— Tschaikowsky 

Miss Doris Welch 
Sunbury, Pa. 

4. Piano— Canzonetta in D . . E. Schutt 

Miss Esther Seitzinger 
Freeland, Pa. 

5. Piano— Evening Song A. Jonas 

Miss Nancy Griesemer 
Duluth, Minn. 

6. Song— Let My Song Fill Your Heart 

— E. Charles 

Miss Eleanor Lyons 
Forty Fort, Pa. 

7. Violin— Polish Dance . . . E. Severn 

Mr. Eugene DeBarr 
Northumberland, Pa, 

8. Song— Lullaby Cyril Scott 

Miss Louise McWilliams 
Danville, Pa. 

9. Piano— A Memory Berg 

Mr. Arthur Tyson 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

10. Piano—Dance Caprice Grieg 

Miss Jean Bowers 
Landisburg, Pa. 

11. Organ— In Friendship's Garden— 
Maitland 

Miss Lois Yost 
Conyngham, Pa. 

12. Piano — Mazurka in E minor— Les- 
chetizky 

Miss Janet Shockey 

13. Song — Ah! Moon of My Delight— 
L. Lehmann 

(In a Persian Garden) 
Mr. Clyde Sechler 
Riverside, Pa. 

14. Trumpet— Willow Echoes, F. Simon 

Mr. Kenneth Bonsall 
Grampian, Pa. 

15. Choruses — a. Clouds — E. Charles- 
Treharne 

Solo, Miss Anna Reeder 

b. Monotone N. Lock wood 

c. John Henry (Tennessee Mountain 

Song Arr. Groff 

The Conservatory of Music 
Chorus Class 



"CAMPUS CHARLIE 



3) 



Dear Eds and Co-Eds, lend an eye, 
for Charlie is about to spin his web. 

Really the most important social 
function of the year was the Junior 
Prom held last Saturday eve, but there 
are a few other bits of campus happen- 
ings during the past week that I would 
ilke to mention first. 

I noticed that Lila has become very 
inquisitive lately, especially to Peg last 
week on the steps of Seibert. Did 
everyone see Harder's dance, done in 
the best of Bloomneld fashion? It 
was — , well, I'll leave that up to you. 
Too bad Ernie wasn't there. 

I suppose you know the baseball 
team defeated Bucknell here last week. 
Then the team was defeated at Buck- 
nell with the excuse of "poor ump- 
ing," however, we believe that because 
"Bucky" and Schleig were without 
their fair rooters, the team slipped. 
Too bad the team must go away this 
week for a few days. 

Have you seen Gus leaving Fred's 
lately; you should watch him, and he 
isn't alone either. What's the lowdown, 
Gus? 

It warmed my heart to see Peg and 
Bill mot the Bucknell-Susquehanna 
combination) together again, after a 
queer week-end. Bill seemed nervous 
all week-end, while Jim took Peg danc- 
in". Nye certainly is a problem child. 

Sub-Freshman day proved a huge 
success especially with such fair pros- 
pect! as I saw, and hope to see again 
next year. 

Personally, I think Young looked 
"device" in the receiving line, but he 
did look a bit worried. It couldn't have 
been because Mr. and Mrs. Coyne wen 



in town. 

A bevy of lads and lasses really en- 
joyed the Prom but I noticed a long 
face on Forney and Davis. Don't girls 
pick the queerest places for a bad 
mood? Every "dating" fellow on the 
campus will be an authority for this 
statement. 

I saw several budding romances in 
the bud— among them were Joe and 
Marion, Jim and Pegi?i, Bob and 
Marian, and John and Elsie. 

Anybody see the fortune teller be- 
side Nye and Sivick? Poor Bill is on 
the lookout for a "Mary" — if anyone 
sees Mary, please give Bill a ring, and 
I don't mean a finger ring. 

Spechtie and Al seem to be con- 
soled once again; at least the male 
part of this combination is always 
dwelling on his fair companion's name, 
and flowering it with compliments; 
maybe it's just the springtime with the 
birds and bees, etc. 

And did you know?— Did you know 
that Spiggle hadn't even spoken to his 
date before the "zero hour?" George 
we're surprised — and after she has 
been here so long. 

I noticed that "Mitmonovitch" was 
among the missing Saturday night. 
Could it be that Red didn't receive his 
allowance, or was it because of Feme's 
other plans? We won't venture a guess. 

I noticed several of the mothers at 
the dance. I hope that they left with a 
favorable impression, but then all 
dances leave a huorable impression — 
don't they'.' 

I guess Charlie will close this column 
with the well known phrase about — 



Schofield Addresses Phi 
Kappa on 'Greek Vases' 

The final meeting of the Greek club 
was called to order by President George 
Brosius last Mnoday evening in the so- 
cial rooms of Seibert Hall. 

Following a brief business session, 
each of the senior members of the 
club spoke a few words of farewell as 
they expressed the benefits which they 
had derived from their affiliations in 
the Greek society. Doctor Ahl then 
expressed his desire that Greek culture 
and the classical studies continue to be 
pursued as an important part of mod- 
ern education. 

Reginald Schofield discussed the sub- 
ject of Greek vases. He said that the 
characteristics of the Hellenic peoples 
are clearly seen in the art of that race. 
Vases were used to store foods and 
drinks as well as for a container for 
perfumes, flowers, and incense. 

The speaker then illustrated his in- 
teresting lecture by distributing var- 
ious pictures of Greek vases and pot- 
tery. 

The following officers were inducted 
for the 1940-41 school term. 

President Mary Emma Yoder 

Vice President . . G. Robert Booth 

Secretary Paul Kniseley 

Treasurer Eugene Smith 

Messenger Wilmer F. Klinger 

George Brosius, Leon Haines and 
Robert Sander are the retiring officers 
into whose footsteps the new officials 
will tread. 

After the serving of delicious re- 
freshments, the meeting was adjourn- 
ed. 



S- 



All references to persons living (?), 
or half-dead are purely coincidental 
and not aimed at any one person, 
and so be good 'til next week—." 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



BUCKNELL AND S. U. SPLIT VICTORIES ON 
RESPECTIVE DIAMONDS IN PAST WEEK 



-<8>- 






S. U. Defeats Bucknell; 
Gensel Tosses Score, 9-7 

With a three run rally in the first 
inning, and a five run spurt in the 
seventh, the Crusaders tipped in an- 
other victory for the baseball season 
by defeating the Bucknell University 
Bisons, 9-7, on the home diamond 

Johnnie Gensel, who tossed his first 
tough assignment, gave the visitors 10 
hits, while Billings suffered for the 
Bisons by handing out eight. 

Able to pick up only one run in the 
first, to three for the Crusaders, the 
visitors fell behind on the scoreboard 
until the fourth inning, when a five 
run rally gave them a decided advan- 
tage. Nevertheless, Gensel stuck to 
his guns and held the Bisons to the 
finish without a threat. 

In the sixth, on an error by Allen, 
Joe Zavarich romped around the sacks 
for the first homer of the season, the 
first feat of its kind on the home dia- 
mond this spring. Following this blast, 
Billings, Bucknell hurler, retired m 
favor of Bear who pitched into the fin- 
al inning when Joe Buzas came to the 
mound to round out the game. 

Kaltreider opened Susquehanna's 
big inning in the seventh when he 
drew a base on balls, Zeravica came to 
the plate to crack out a three bagger 
and scored Kalcreldei. Gensel made 
out on a caught foul, but Zavarich 
and Lewis received free trips to first 
base. Isaacs arrived at first thru an 
error by the center fielder, to bring in 
Zavarich. Zuback filled the bases on 
a walk, and Ford smashed out a single 
to bring in two runs. Kalcreider again 
received a free trip to first, but Zera- 
vica popped to shortstop to icl.ire the 
side. The lineup: 

Bucknell U. AB R H O A E 

Kessler, lb 5 1 2 11 

Doenges, 3b 5 1 2 

Allen, cf 5 1 2 

Buzas, ss, p 5 1 2 2 5 1 

Kiick, c 2 2 1 3 

Ronk, 2b 5 1 1 1 

Snyder, rf 5 1 1 

Nolan, If 4 1 2 1 

Billings, p 3 2 4 

Bear, p, ss 1 2 

Totals 40 7 10 24 11 1 

Susquehanna U AB R H O A E 

Isaacs, 2b 3 2 2 1 

Zuback, cf 3 1 1 3 

Ford, 2b 5 1 2 2 

Kaltreider, ss 2 2 2 2 2 

Zeravica, c 5 1 2 2 1 

Schleig, rf 5 2 2 

Gensel, p 5 1 1 2 

Zavarich, If 3 2 1 5 

Lewis, lb 3 1 8 1 

Totals 33 9 8 27 7 4 

Score by innings: 
Bucknell 11050000 0—7 

5. U 3 15 x— 9 

Two base hits: Schleig. 

Three base hits: Snyder, Zeravica. 
Struck out: by Gensel 2. by Billings 3. 
Bases on balls: off Gensel 3, Billings 

6, Bear 5. 

Stolen bases: Buzas, Gensel, Zava- 
rich, Zuback.Schleig. Kaltreider, Kiick. 
Umpire: Beamenderfer. 
S 

Judge, Mansfield Star 
Wins in Tennis Meet 



Crusaders Bow to Bison 
Friday to Score of 6-2 

The Bucknell Bisons defeated the 
Susquehanna Crusaders at the Buck- 
nell field last Friday by the score of 
6-2. The defeat was in revenge of the 
victory of the Crusaders two days earl- 
ier. A four inning pitchers duel was 
shattered in the fifth inning when 
Bucknell scored five runs. Susque- 
hanna tallied in the sixth and again 
in the seventh when Isaacs smashed a 
home run deep into center field. 

The lineup: 
Bucknell R H O A E 

Kessler, lb 7 

Doenges, 3b 1 1 

Allen, cf 1 3 

Buzas, ss 1 1 3 3 

Kiick, c 2 9 1 

Ronk, 2b O 4 3 

Snyder, rf 2 3 1 

Nolan, If l 2 1 

Hemming, p l l o 2 1 

Aumiller 



Tops High Jump Beeotd £™££j^j~ 



Yesterday the tennis team journeyed 
to Bethlehem, where they played the 
Moravian netmen in a return match, 
and lost again, this time bv a score of 
9-0. 




Totals '. 6 10 27 10 2 

Susquehanna R H O A E 

Isaacs, 3b i l 

Zuback, cf 1 1 

Kaltreider, ss 1 7 

Ford, 2b O 1 7 

Zeravica, c 4 1 

Schleig, rf l 2 

Zavarich, If 1 2 

Lewis, lb 2 12 2 

Krouse, p 1 1 



Crusader Cindermen 
Turn Back American 



Healon Heads Local Attack With 
Three Wins, Breaks High Jump Rec- 
ord; Final Score Ends 85 to 41 



PROGRAM RELEASED 
FOR COMMENCEMENT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
service which has become a traditional 
occasion known as the David Day Hill 
Top Service in honor of the great mis- 
sionary who with his wife gave his life 
to a most worthy cause. 

At five there will be Vesper Medita- 
tion in the Chapel with members of 
the Conservatory Faculty in charge of 
the program. 

Monday morning the Commencement 
exercises will be conducted in the 
Chapel by Dr. G. *"orris Smith. Fred 
Pierce Corson, president of Dickinson 
College, will give the Commencement 
address. Dean Gait will present the 
recommendations for degrees, as ap- 
proved by the faculty. 

At noon the final event of the year 
will take place, namely, the Trustees' 
Dinner in Horton Hall. 

strand 

T H C A T 1 f 



Totals 



2 5 24 12 3 



Susquehanna 0000 01 10 — 2 

Bucknell 0000 5001 x— 6 

Two base hits: Kiick, Nolan. 

Home run: Isaacs. 

Left on bases: Bucknell 7, Susque- 
hanna 6. 

Double plays: Buzas to Rank, Buzas 
to Kessler. 

Struck out: by Krouse 1, Hemming 7. 
Winning pitcher: Hemrning 
Losing pitcher: Krouse. 



Last Saturday morning the next step 
in the process of naming a state high 
school tennis champion took place on 
the Susquehanna tennis courts. Nine 
competitors from Bloomsburg, Mans- 
field, and Williamsport played a brack- 
eted elimination tournament to deter- 
mine the champion for this particular 
district. This winner later in the sea- 
son will compete in another tourna- 
men to determine the state-wide high 
school tennis champion. 

The winner of this tournament play- 
ed last Saturday was Charles Judge 
from Mansfield, who easily defeated 
his first opponent from Williamsport 
without any trouble, to be placed im- 
mediately into the semifinals, From 
this position he played Hutchinson 
from Bloomsburg, seeded number one, 
and defeated him after a very tiring 
first set 11-9, and a short fast set 6-1. 
In the finals, Judge played Krauss, also 
from Bloomsburg. Krauss had had no 
difficulty in arriving to the finals. Af- 
ter a short rest, the finals match was 
played between these two. Judge plav- 
ifig remarkable tennis, to defeat Krauss 
6-3, 6-0, 

S 



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S. U. Netmen Defeated 
By State and Juniata 

Last Friday the tennis team went to 
State College, where they played their 
sixth match of the season, and lost 
to the superior team of Penn State by 
a score of 9-0. The summaries are as 
follows: 
Singles 

Winstein def. Williams, 6-0, 6-0; 
Goodman def. Sterrett, 6-3, 6-0; 
Hughes def. McCord, 6-2, 6-2; Bowman 
def. Bantley, 6-1, 6-0; Knode def. 
Jones, 6-0, 6-0; Lesko def. Mitman, 
6-3, 6-1. 
Doubles 

Knode -Lesko def. Williams - Ster- 
rett, 6-0, 6-4; Feldman-Ramsay def. 
Bantley-Mitman, 6-3, 6-2; Huyck- 
Hough def. McCord-Jones, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2. 

Saturday afternoon the netmen 
again lost by a score of 5-4 against 
Juniata College, on our courts. Wil- 
liams and McCord won their singles 
matches, while Williams and Sterrett 
won their first doubles match, Bantley 
and Mitman also winning their doubles. 
The summaries: Williams clef. Boyd, 
6-4, 6-4; Barben def. Sterrett, 7-5, 6-1; 
Ayres def. Schuck, 6-1, 5-7, 6-1; Stew- 
art def. Bantley, 6-4, 6-1; McCord def. 
Gehrett, 6-3. 6-1; Griffith def. Jones, 
6-3, 7-5. In the doubles, Williams- 
Sterrett def. Boyd-Barben, 5-7, 6-2, 
6-3; Ayres-Stewart def. Schuck-Mc- 
Cord, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5; Bantley-Mitman 
def. Gehrett-Griffith, 7-5, 12-10. 

S 

ALUMNI ACTIVE IN READING 
AND IIARRISBl'RG MEETINGS 

E. T. Yorty and H. Vernon Blough 
represented the campus at the second 
annual dinner meeting of the Read- 
ing-Susquehanna Alumni Club at the 
Berkshire Hotel in Reading on May 3. 
Officers of the club are D. Edgar 
Hutchison, of New Holland, president; 
William Rannon, of Reading, vice- 
president; and Wahlen Fenstermacher. 
of Reading, secretary-treasurer. 

Dr. George Fisher, faculty member 
for forty-four years, was the guest 
speaker for the annual banquet of the 
Harrisburg-Susquehanna Alumni Club 
on May 7th at the Harrisburg Y, M, 
C. A. Alumni from Harrisburg. Leb- 
anon. Millersburg, Millcrstown, Dun- 
cannon, Carlisle, and Hershey attend- 
ed the dinner. The officers of the club 
are Fred C, Burris. president; Charles 
A. Miller. vice-prrMd<ii> and Janet I. 
Earhart, scrrHar- -'rcasurci', all >f 
Harrisburg. 



On Saturday, May 11, the Susque- 
hanna trackmen met and vanquished 
American University with a final score 
of 85-41. The meet, held on University 
Field, ended with Susquehanna chalk- 
ing up ten first places which included 
firsts in all the field events. 

Blair Heaton '42, was the outstanding 
star of the meet, having won the 100 
yd. dash, the 220-yd. dash, and the 
high jump, as well as placing second 
in the shot put and tying for third [ 
place in the broad jump. In all he 
amassed a score of 18 1 -.. points. Heaton 
now holds the Susquehanna University \ 
record for the high jump at 5 feet, 11 ^ 
inches. 

Summary of events: 
Running Events 

Mile Run: Won by Wood <AU>; sec- 
ond, MacQuesten <S); third, Smith 
(AU). Time, 4:53.6. 

440 Yard Run: Won by Dixon (AU); 
second, Shusta <S); third, Boykin 
(AU). Time, 53.8. 

100 Yard Dash: Won by Heaton (S); | 
second, Cooke (AU); third, Pritchard 
(S). Time, 10.4. 

120 Yard High Hurdles: Won by I 
Pritchard (S); second, Smith (S>; ! 
third, Cooke (AU). Time, 16.6. 

880 Yard Run: Won by Streitberger 
(AU); second, Smith (AU); third, : 
Wood (AU). Time, 2:12. 

220 Yard Dash: Won by Heaton <S>; I 
second, Cooke (AU); third, Dixon! 
(AU). Time, 23.1. 

2 Mile Run: Won by Wood (AU);! 
second, Little, (AU); third, Thatcher 
<S). Time, 11:25.4. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles : Won by I 
Pritchard (S); second, Cooke (AU); 
third, Meyers (§), Time, 26.7. 
Field Events 

Pole Vault: Won by Learn <S) and '. 
Musser (A), tie; third, Herman <S). 
Height, 10 feet. 

High Jump: Won by Heaton (§); I 
second. Warner, <S»; third, Herman 
(8). Height, 5 feet, 11 ' t inches. 

Shot Put: Won by Templin (S>; sec- 
ond, Heaton (S>; third. Fox (AU). Dis- 
tance. 36 feet, 4.5 inches. 

Discus: Won by Kaufman 01); sec- I 
ond, Lewis <S>; third, Templin (S). j 
Distance, 110 feet, 4 inches. 

Broad Jump: Won by Richards (■); 
second, Pritchard (•); third, Heaton, 
<S» and Musser <S), tie. Distance, 20 
feet, 5 inches. 

Javelin; Won by Warner (S); sec- 
ond, Kaufman (S>; third, Richards (St. 

Final score: Susquehanna 85, Ameri- 
can University 41. 

S 

I, I'. HOST TO P. I. A. A. 
SEMI FINALS IN TENNIS 



Susquehanna University will be host 
to the high school athletes who will be ; 
competing for posts in the State iinal-, 
the 25th of May. Susquehanna was 
host for the P. I. A. A. semi-finals in j 
tennis, on May 11th. Those sch 
that are expected to register for the j 
P. I. A, A. semi-finals include: Milton, 
Mt. Carmel Township, Northumber- 
land. Muncy, Sayre, Selinsgrove. Sha- 
mokin, South Waverly, South William 
port, Sunbury, Wutsontown, Trevorton, I 
Shamokin, and others. Theiv a ill be 
event;; for both the A and B cl* • 
with trials beam run Saturday morn- 
ing. May 25th. 

S 



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sunbury 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
MAY 17 AND 18 

Jack Benny 
Rochester 

'Buck Benny Rides 
Again" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
MAY 20 AND 21 

Lana Turner 
Joan Blondell 

"Two Girls on 
Broadway" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MAY 22 AND 23 

George Raft 
Joan Bennett 

"House Across the 
Bay" 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

FRIDAY, MAY 17 

W. C. Fields 
Mae West 

"My Little 
Chickadee" 

SATURDAY, MAY 18 

One Autry 
Smiley Burnette 

"Rancho Grande" 

MONDAY, MAY 20 

William Boyd 
Russel Hayden 

"Showdown" 

Tl'ESDAY, MAY 21 

Ronald Colman 

"The Light That 
Failed" 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

MAY 22 AND 23 

(LARK GABLE 
JOAN CRAWFORD 

in 

"Strange Cargo" 

with 

Peter Lorre 
Ian Hunter 



Compliments of 

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MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Farmers National 
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Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are Interested in a Bigger 
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and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 

Let oa join hands in Making Thli 
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VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna. 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Typewriters 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The I fenall stom 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE, PA, 



FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



S25 Market St - 
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- 706 Market St 
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Personally Selected 

COATS. DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



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PAGE FOIR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1940 



Conservatory Seniors 
To Present Recital 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



The annual Senior 
each year by the seniors in the Con- 
servatory of Music will be divided in- 
to two sections this year, one being 
given on Monday evening, May 20, the 
other being given Tuesday evening. 
May 21. Both will begin at 8:15 p. m. 
in the Seibert Auditorium. 

Four seniors will appear on this 
year's program: Alice Deiterick, Char- 
lotte Baish, Mrs. Mildred Follmer, and 
Elizabeth Barnhart. 

The programs for the two evenings 
are as follows: 
Senior Recital, May 20th 
Piano Concerto in E flat Liszt 

Mi i 1 tl:k 

Professor Liin-'.j.i i».li at 

the organ 

Piano n. Legende . . Campbell-Tipton 

b. The Fountain Griffes 

Miss Baish 
Organ Prelude and Fugue, A minor- 
Bach 

Miss Barnhart 
Piano a. Barcarole, Op. 44 . . . Liadoff 

b. Rhapsodic in C Dohnanyi 

Mrs. Follmer 
Piano a. Caprice (Alceste) — Gluck-St. 
Saens 

b. The Nightingale Liszt 

Miss Deiterick 

Organ a. Chant de May Jongen 

b. Scherzo Vierne 

Miss Barnhart 

Mrs. Follmer 

Piano Concerto in B flat . . . Brahms 

(First movement) 

Professor Linebaugh at 

the organ 

Senior Recital, May 21st 

Overture The Secret Marriage— Cima- 

rosa 

The Symphonic Society 
Professor Allison, Conductor 

Piano a. Voiles Debussy 

b. Etude de Concert Liszt 

Miss Baish 
Piano a. Reflets dans l'eau . Debussy 
b. Caprice-Burlesque . Gabrilowitch 
Miss Deiterick 

Organ a. Dreams McAmis 

b. Sunshine (Toccata) ... Swinnen 
Miss Barnhart 

Piano Carnaval Schumann 

Preambule, Pierrot, Arlequin, 
Valse Noble. Eusebius, Florestan, 
Coquette, Chiarina, Chopin, 
Reconnaissance, Valse Allemande, 
Aveu. Promenade. Marche des 
"Davidsbundler." 

Mrs. Follmer 

Piano Concerto in E minor 

(First movement) 

Miss Baish and 

Orchestra 

S 



Second Semester 1939-40 

BEGINNING MAY 23, 1940 

This is a temporary schedule; all conflicts should be reported to Mrs. Ul- 
rich immediatelv. The corrected schedule will appear in the next issue of The 
Recital given Susque hanna. 



DAY 

Thursdav 



Friday 



Saturday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Friday 



9:00 A. M. 

Physiology 

English Comp. (all sec) 
Engl. Lit. (all sec.) 
Abnormal Psych. 



Art Appreciation 
Physical Chem. 
Office Practice 
Business English 
Fr. Romanticism 
International Law 
Ir.teg. Calculus 
Introd. to Philosophy 
[ntrod. Physics 

8:00 

Bible <all sec.) 

Poeuy 

Money & Banking 

Qual. Chemistry 
Insurance 
French Survey 
German Novelle 
Ancient History 
Penna. History 

Zoology 

Inter. Accounting 
Salesmanship 
Techniques of Tchg. 
General Science 
European Government 
Inter. Latin 
Adv. Calculus 

Organic Chemistry 
Beginning Greek 
General Psychology 
Elementary Shorthand 
American Literature 



Comm. Geography 
Publ. Finance 
German Lang. & Lit. 
N. T. Greek 
Hist, of Philosophy 
Radio 
— /»-, 



2:00 P. M. 

Bookkeeping Meths. 

Beg. French 

Beg. German 

Elem. Accounting 

Inter. German 

Surveying 

Inter. Shorthand & Typ. 

Shorthand & Typ. Meths. 
Botany 
Economics 
Transportation 
W. Eur. History- 
Analytic Geometry 
General Physics 
Public Speaking 
The Family 



contests for her hand. After the Lord 
Mayor raises an objection because of 
the unknown identity of the courag- 
eous suitor, he is recognized by the 
visiting prince as his long lost brother 
and the betrothal is blessed. 

So "all is well that ends well" is 
apropos to the situation of this day 
which concluded with the Junior Prom. 



MANY ALUMNI RETURN 
SUB-FRESHMAN DAY 



History of Music 
Embryology 
Business Law 
Interm. French 
American Hist. 
Organ. Athletics 

Personal Hygiene 
Ethics 



(Continued from Page 1) 
"notables" as Eleanor Jones, Margaret 
Corson, and Kent Worthington. All 
of these are now teaching, but Mar- 
garet Corson is planning to enter 
Temple next year to study medicine. 

You might also have seen "Tim" 
Barnes '37, Martha Bolig '37, LaRue 
Shempp '36, and Alfarata Stamets '37 j 
roaming about the campus among the 
sub-freshmen. Everyone was anxious 
to see his old alumni friends on Sat- 
urday, as well as to meet new ones for 
the next year. 

The close of Sub-Freshman Day ac- 
tivities did not mark the end of the 
visits of a few of the alumni; for they 
r imply could not break away until 
after the Junior Prom, climax to an 
exciting day. 

S 

THEATRE GUILD TO 
PRESENT MYSTERY DRAMA 



who walks in her sleep. 

Then there's a third attempt at mur- 
der. Then the lights go out. Then lots 
of things happen! 

Technical staff for "Criminal at 
Large" consists of Faculty Advisor Mr. 
James C. Freeman, Stage manager 
Grace Fries, Prompter Marie Edlund, 
General directorial assistant Elizabeth 
Albury, and Technical director Phillip 
Bergstresser. 

Scenery crew are Stephen Berg- 
stresser, Donald Critchneld, Kenneth 
Kinney, John Schleig, Burton Rich- 
ards, and Eugene Williams. Lighting 
crew are Lawrence Cady and Jack 
Mayer. 

Properties, makeup, and costume 
crew members are Margaret Chamber- 
lain, Mary Cox, Ruth Farley, June 
Jerore, Mary Catherine Mack, and 
Ruth Specht. 

Publicity agents for the play are 
Vernon Blough and Pierce Allen Cor- 
yell. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



Greek Life 

Auditing 

Educational Psychology 

German Comp. and Con. 

Fiction 

Horace 

Trigonometry 

Comp. Anatomy- 
Greek Literature 
Sound 

Social Psych. 
Roman Drama 
Modern Social Problems 



(Continued from Page 1) 
didn't know well. 

Inspector Tanner tries questioning a 
snivelling little man, Briggs, Lawrence 
Cady, who tells a lot in hopes of clem- 
ency from his prison sentence. Warden 
Wilmot, Jack Mayer, who has brought 
Briggs, doesn't hope for much from 
the testimony, Briggs being Briggs. 

The Scotland Yard trio swings into 
action. Inspector Tanner discovers 
several things about the inhabitants of 
the murder scene. He finds out about 
the blank checks Lady Lebanon's been 
forcing her son to sign. Through Ser- 
geant Totty he discovers a certain 
room is locked from the detectives' 
search. He finds out, without too much 
detecting, that his other assistant, Fer- 
raby, has fallen, and hard, for Isla, the 
beautiful and frightened young lady 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERING AND 

INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



eant was one in the setting of medieval I had and we believe our Queen Mada- 
times when knights won fair ladies in lene and her court were the most gra- 
games of sport and conquest. Miss | cious we have had also. 
Mary Emma Yoder was the Queen of | The pa geant told the story of the 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



MAY QUEEN FETED AT 
COLORFUL CORONATION 



(Continued from Page 1) 
men's dormitory to witness the crown- 
ing of the May Queen, and the pre- 
sentation of the pageant. The bleach- 
ers were filled with friends and rela- 
tives of the students and many visitors. Dance 



the pageant and her ladies-in-waiting 
I were Marion Crompton, Eleanor Smith, 
I Lois Davis, and Melissa Smoot. Karl 
Chopin i Young was the father of the princess, 
and Gus Kaufman the Prince, while 
Jack Helm was the dashing minstrel 
who finally won the hand of the beau- 
tiful princess. Michael Wolfe, Jack 
Walsh, and John Burke were the other 
contestants for the princess' hand. 
Clyde Sechler stole the show by his 
antics as the court jester. 

The dances, which were directed by 

Miss Shure, were the best we have ever 

had. The dances were the Morris 

Dance, the Scarf Dance, the May Pole 

and a unique solo dance by 



Lord Mayor's daughter who had been 
chosen by the villagers as their May 
Queen and who was permitted on this 
May Day to have whatever she wished, 
as the title of the pageant "As the 
Queen Wishes" suggests. The princess 
has three noble suitors striving for her 
hand, but her heart is captured by an 
unknown minstrel who succeeds in the 



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The May Queen. Madelene Hayes, Louise McWilliams in the role of a 

looked very beautiful in a beautiful gypsy dancer. Two tumblers of great 

gown of white with a big, full skirt, skill were Doris Welsh and Margaret 

She carried an armful of gorgeous red Chamberlain. 

roses. Following closely was Anne Hill, The pageant was very colorful and 

the lovely lady-in-waiting; attired in very gay. The costumes of all the par- 

a lovely blue gown, and carry irm an ticipants were very appropriate to the 



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armful of red roses also. There was a 
lovely contrast between the dark haired 
May Queen and the very fair haired 
lady-in-waiting; and they made an 
exquisite picture as they stood before 
the spectators. Next came the six 
loveh attendants of the Queen in 
couples. The first couple composed of 
Naomi Bingaman and Margaret Bheea- 
ley. in gOWUf of delicate pink modeled 
after the style of the Lady's-in-Wait- 
ing, Following them came Dorothy 
Shutt and Eunice Arentz, attired in 
aqua gowns. The final couple of at-' 
tendants, Mane Edlund and Sally 
Baish, were attired in gOWM Of peach. 
The Ma\ procession was very color- 
fUl, and a delighi to the eye. The 
climax or most solemn point was the 
Crowning ot the Queen by the lady-in- 
waiuim as the Queen knelt before the 
huge crowd assembled. It was very 
Impressive and there certainly was a 
battery of cameras at work at this 
tunc The Queen and her court then 
retired to their dais to watch the pag- 
eant. 

Tin* pageant took place immediatelv. 
it was written by Clyde Sechler, and 

directed h\ Miss Irene Shure. Miss 
Shure directed all the dances, and 
coached all the participants. The pas- 



time in which the pageant was set. 
The music was furnished by a band 
directed by Joseph Pasterchik under 
Professor Allison. 

We are sure that this May Day was 
the most successful one we have ever 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Wait 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
FREE 

Shoe Shine Parlor 

NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Fall Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



BRESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For informntlon address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthorn 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE -THEOLOGICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Prei. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D„ Dean 



! Emanuel Whitenight 



: 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



Last Issue 

With this issue The Susquehanna 
ceases publication for the school year 
to resume activity next September. 

Final Exams Begin Tomorrow 

The second semester final examin- 
ations will begin tomorrow morning at 
8 a. m. The final schedule of exam- 
inations, including changes on the 
mimeographed schedules, appears on 
page four. The exams will end Friday, 
May 31, at four o'clock. 

Conservatory Picnic 

The students from the Conservatory 
of Music will picnic together at Roll- 
ing Green Park Saturday morning and 
afternoon. 

Memorial Day Holiday 

Memorial Day will be observed as a 
holiday and, therefore, no examina- 
tions will be given on that day. 

S. C. A. Picnic 

On Memorial Day the Student Chris- 
tian Association will sponsor their an- 
nual hike and picnic. The event will 
be open to the entire Student body. 
Details concerning the time and place 
will be announced soon. 

Inter- Sorority Dance Thursday 

The sororities will entertain at their 
annual Commencement Dance on 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1940 



Number 6 



Senior StaffMembers 
Receive Due Thanks 



Best Wishes 



r~ 



THE SUSQUEHANNA extends its j 
heartiest thanks and goodwill to the i 
graduating members of the editorial 
and business staff. Each one has done ; 
his part with diligence and the paper 
has advanced through their various ef- 
forts. The following seniors merit 
credit: 

Reed Gulick, of Camden, N. J., who 
served the paper as editor-in-chief, in 
addition to his activities in the S. C. 
A., the Biemic and the German Clubs. 

John Bice, of Millerstown, who was I 
the business manager. John also was 
prominent in basketball and track, In- j 
terclass and Interfraternity sports. He 
was house manager and secretary of 
Bond and Key and was an active mem- 
ber of the Business Society. 

Margaret Grenoble, of Spring Mills, 
was the Conservatory reporter, in ad- 
dition to which she was a member of 
the Motet Choir, the W. A. A., Inter- 




Hutchison New Head Baccalaureate Speaker 

of Student Council 



H^ 



oiij 



Thursday evening, May 30, from nine ■ gororitv Council ' and was president of 
to one. The music will be provided by 
Charlie Master. 



Fraternity House Dances Friday 

The fraternity commencement dances 
will be held at the chapter houses on 
Friday evening, May 31, from nine to 
one. 

Commencement Week Program 

An extensive program of activities has 
been arranged for the departing sen- 
iors, beginning with the Senior Day 
exercises on Friday, May 31. The de- 
tailed program is found in the com- 
mencement week article on page one. 
S 

To Study at Boston 




S. A. I. 

Anne Hill, of West Hazleton, was re- 
porter. She served as financial secre- ! 
tary of the Inter-Sorority Council, vice 
president of O. D. S., judiciary chair- 
nan of Student Council, and secretary j 
of the senior class. Anne was active 
in class sports, the W. A. A., and the 
German Club. 

Virginia Mann, of Yonkers, N. Y., 
I was reporter and the president of the 
j Susquehanna Publishing Association. 
! She was a member of the Motet Choir, 
! the Susquehanna Players, the German 
and the French Clubs, and Student 
Council. She was mentioned in Who's 
Who Among Students in American Col- 
leges and Universities this year. 
S 

Campus Club to Award 
Prizes for Scholarship 



BARBARA L. KRUGER 

Miss Barbara Kruger 
To Marry This June 



Dean of Women Resigns Position; 
Will Complete Work for Doctorate 
In Psychology 



Miss Barbara Kruger, dean of wom- 
en, will conclude her duties here at 
Susquehanna at the end of this school 
year because she will be married on 
June 22 to Charles O'Neil, of New 
York. Her engagement was announced 
by her mother, Mrs. George Kruger, 
Amityville, Long Island, at a dinner 
held last month in Baltimore. 

Miss Kruger is a graduate of Bar- 
nard College, the women's undergradu- 
ate branch of Columbia University, and 
holds her master's degree from Colum- 
bia graduate school. Two years ago 

| she assumed the office of dean of wom- 
en and has been an active member of 
the Women's Auxiliary. Just recently 

i Miss Kruger was maae me program 
The Susquehanna University Cam- I chairman of the Susquehanna Valley 



On Tuesday, May 14, the new Stu- 
dent Council members were installed 
into office by the out-going president, 
Dorothy Shutt. 

The service was opened by a hymn 
followed by a prayer. Dorothy Shutt 
gave her president's report for the year 
after which Lois Beamenderfer gave 
the secretary's report. 

Jane Hutchison, the newly elected 
president, was then sworn into office 
by the out-going president. The meet- 
ing was adjourned by the singing of 
the Alma Mater. 

Other members of the new council 

are as follows: Elaine Miller, S. C. A. 

representative; Marian Crompton. In- 
| tersorority Council representative; 
| Nancy Griesemer, W. A. A. represen- 
I tative; Betty Brand, house manager; 
j Arlene Bittner, day students' respre- 

sentative; June Snyder, social chair- 
] man; Mary Emma Yoder, judiciary 

chairman; and Maxine Heefner. pub- 
| licity chairman. 

S 

Sororities, Fraternities 
Prepare for Elaborate 
Commencement Dances 




REV, HENRY H. BAGGER 

CommencementWeek 
Bids Farewell to '40 



On Thursday evening, May 30, the 
, Intersorority Council will have its an- 
nual commencement dance. Music will 
be furnished by Charlie Master and 
his orchestra. Dancing from 9 until 1. 
The fraternity commencement dan- 
ces will be May 31. Beta Kappa's dance 



President of Pittsburgh Synod and 
President of Dickinson College to 
Address Graduating Class 



Susquehanna University Commence- 
ment Week will be from Mav 31 to 



will be at the chapter house, with The June , ^ m> which win bid 

Lycomans from Wilhamsport as the fareweU t0 the dass of 1940 follows; 

orchestra. The house will be decorated Fridav 
with laurels and dogwood creating an 



(j/i/v/es c. fzccma*/ 



pus Club, to encourage scholarship 

among che underclassmen, will make 

two awards for good marks in the 

Sophomore and Freshman classes. An 

, award of $5.00 each will be given to 

i the student with the highest scholastic 

j rating in each of these classes. The 

Campus Club will make the award for 

the academic year of 1940-1941, and the 

J ladies want it understood they are not, 

| in awarding the prizes, setting up a 

precedent. 

Decision to make the award, at the 
tea this previous Wednesday, last meet- 
ing till October, coincided with another 
club decision. The faculty wives chose 
Mrs. Stagg, wife of Susquehanna's 
; coach, as their chairman for the com- 
1 ing year. 

The ladies of the Campus Club gave 
Miss Barbara Kruger. Dean of Wom- 
en, a console-bowl and candlesticks — as 
a wedding present. 

Mrs. Ovrebo, wife of the head of the 
physics department, poured. 



Branch of University Women 

Mr. O'Neil is a graduate of the Ecole 
des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France, and 
practiced in France before returning to 
New York City to become associated 
with the firm of Vahan-Hagopian, 

Arrangements are being made for the 
marriage ceremony to be performed in 
St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia. Miss 



outdoor scene. Phi Mu Delta's dance 
will also be at the chapter house. Ivan 
Faux will supply the music. Bond and 
Kev's dance shall be in the Alumri 
Gymnasium, with music by Bruce Hall 
and his orchestra. Dancing from 9 un- 
til 1. 



Conservatory Seniors 
Sponsor Grade Operetta 



The Magic Flute, an operetta, was 
presented last Friday evening in the 
Kruger intends to complete her thesis high school auditorium, by the children 
for her doctorate in psychology after of the Selinsgrove schools. It was very 



Freeman to Work For 
Doctorate at Boston 

Mr. James C. Freeman, instructor in 
English and director of the Susque- 
hanna University Theatre Guild, leaves 
Susquehanna this June for a year of 
further post graduate study. He will 
go to Boston University to finish his 
residence work toward the require- 
ments of a degree of doctor of philo- j attendant responsibilities, will sally out 
sophy in English. While at the Uni- [ int0 Ro0 sevelt and Hitler's brave new 
versity he will serve as a graduate as- ] world for a chance at grabbing them- 
sistant on the faculty. se l VcS large slices of life. Gustavus 

Mr. Freeman graduated from Bow- Adolphus, Seibert, Hassinger. Selins- 
doin College, Brunswick, Maine, in the gr0V e, the Libe, the Con, and the 
class of 1934. He was active in journal- Gvm as weU as tne student hangouts 
ism, and was a member of Theta Delta ln and about Selinsgrove, having with- 
Chi Fraternity. He is a member of Phi st0 od the demanding feet of seventy- 
Beta Kappa, the national fraternity of fi ve SO on citizens, will relax into their 
academic recognition. summer coma. 

In 1935 Harvard University bestowed Tne president will in all likelihood 
on Mr. Freeman the degree of master take a vacation. The Dean of Men 



which she may become a consultant 
psychologist. She will have her resi- 
dence at 503 West 122d Street, New 
York City. 

Miss Kruger said that she would be 
very happy to see any of the people 
from Susquehanna in order that she 
might entertain them through the 
means which they have this week so 
graciously furnished her. She will "al- 
ways consider Susquehanna her coun- 
try home." 

Concerning her work and duties 
(Continued on Page 3» 



delightful and entertaining. The en- 
tire production was in the hands of the 
practice teachers of the Conservatory 
under the direction of Mrs. Giauque. 
Every bit of coaching, costuming, 



9:30 a. m. Senior class day exercises 
on the college campus. 

12; 15 p. m. Senior class luncheon with 
President and Mrs. G. Morris Smith 
at Hit' Susquehanna Valley Country 
Club. 

9:00 p. m. Fraternity parties. 

Saturday 

12:00 noon. Alumni luncheon and 
business meeting. 

2:00 p. m. Class reunions and inform- 
al sports. 

3:30 p. m. - 5:00 p. m. President's re- 
ception at Pine Lawn. 

5:45 p. m. Alumni banquet. 

8:30 p. m. Alumni day play. 

Sunday 

10:15 a. m. Academic procession starts 
from Selinsgrove Hall. 

10:30 a. m. Baccalaureate sermon in 
Trinity Lutheran Church. 

4:00 p. m. The David Day hill top ser- 
vice. 



-♦- 



stage setting, and directing was 5:00 p. m. Vesper meditations at the 

handled by these seniors: Betty Al- university chapel. 

bury, Peggy Grenoble, Anna Reeder, 

Sally Baish. Hilda Friederick, Walter 

Freed, James Pierce, Fred Schmidt. 

David Coren, Joe Mehalow. Edmund 

Kozlowski, and Barner Schwartz are 

to be highly commended on the smooth 

and polished performance. 



Cross-Section of Graduation Class Presented 
With Plans for the Future, Including Marriage 



Monday 

9:45 a. m. Academic procession starts 

(Continued on Page 2» 

S 

Clyde Sechler Made 
Prexy by Juniors 



Commencement Day seventy-five 

Susquehanna University students, now 

I suddenly become Alumni with all the 



from Pennsylvania, and one each from 
New Jersey, Delaware. Maryland, and 
West Virginia. They are teachers, 
lawyers, ministers, doctors, and busi- 
ness administrators — they hope. 

Two members of the class have al- 
ready departed, graduating at the end 
of the first semester. Both have po- 
sitions. Paul Coleman is assistant in 
the physics laboratory at Penn State, 
State College. Reverend Charles Lose 
has been transferred from Selinsgrove. 

The other seventy-five are still here, 
shortly to make their adieux. 

George Spiggle, the lone lawyer 
among the graduators, intends to con- 



of arts. 1936 found him employed by w ui breathe a sigh of relief, and the tinue his education in the University 



the Quincy Evening News, Quincy, Dean of women will get married. Fac- 
Massachusetts. He has been a member u lty members will scatter abroad— on 
of the Susquehanna University faculty this side of the ocean. And the Sen- 



since September, 1936. 



-S- 



NOTIC'E 

Preliminary registrations for 
Sophomores and Juniors will begin 
tomorrow morning; Freshman reg- 
istration will begin Monday. All 
students must register before leav- 
ing the campus or pay a late regis- 
tration fee of five dollars. The pro- 
cedure will be the same as at mid- 
years. 



iors will be graduates. 

These seventy-five new members of 
tlu social community — who are they? 
What are they? Why? When? Where? 

The "when" and "where" are easy to 
answer. They're here at S. U., for the 
present. But they'll leave. Some of 
them will get jobs, some will get mar- 
ried, and some will go on to graduate 
school. And some will do all three 

The "why" needs to be answered by 
a greater authority. But "who" they 
are can be gone into in detail. They 
are residents of Ave states. Most come 



of West Virginia's law school. George 
says he's going to be a bachelor all his 
life, but whether higher courts reverse 
this decision or not. Tempus will have 
to fugit awhile first. 

George Brosius is one of the pre- 
theologians. There are eight all told: 
Daniel Bergstressei', Robert Fisher, 
John Gensel, Leon Haines, William 
Nye, Paul Orso. Robert Sander, and 
the aforementioned George. He will 
finish his ministerial education at Get- 
tysburg Seminary, by the battlefield of 
the same name. George hopes to get 
married, "ohhh, eventually." As to 
children, he maintains a firm "no com- 
ment." 



Lou Baylor, president of this year's 
Seniors, and one of the five pre-medi- 
cal students, (John Drumheller. Wil- 
liam Gehron, John Learn, and John 
Updegrovei believes in marriage. Up- 
on graduation from Susquehanna Lou 
will go to Hahnemann Hospital in 
Philadelphia, for a period of interne- 
ship. "Don't know what happens alter 
that— may get married maybe before 
I finish." On the subject of children, 
Lou declares. "Three's a nice crowd. 
Bill Gehron, another pre-med. will go 
to Philadelphia, too, but to Jefferson. 
He votes for marriage and a family, 
two boys and one girl 

John Sehleiff, is. along with Robert 
Gabrenya. Graham Schuck, and Jack 
Shipe, one of the Business Adminis- 
trations students. John favors mar- 
attiT a live year career as a 
bachelor. Then a wife, and children, 
at the most three of the hitter. 

Grace Fries is one of the forty -nine 
students in the music, liberal arts, and 
commercial departments, who contem- 
plates teaching. Grace sees no reason, 
blushingly, why she shouldn't marry, 
and, blushingly, have several children, 
after, blushingly, her career. She 
thinks, blushingly, four kids would be 
nice, two boys, and two girls, as in 
(Continued on Page 2> 



Class called to order last Monday 
noon by Donald Ford. Clyde Sechler 
was elected president for the coming 
year, The retiring president gave a 
financial repori tor the Junior Prom. 

The officers are: president, Clyde 
Sechler; vice president. Dorothy Arty; 
secretary, Martha Tribby; and trea- 
surer. Paul Shatto. Miss Arty is one 
ol | very few to ever hold an office in 
a class for two successive years. 

After the election the class discussed 
what should be done with the profit 
realized from the Prom. It was de- 
cided to wait until next fall to take 
definite action. 



S. C. A. to Conduct Annual 
Memorial Dav Picnic 



The annual picnic of the Student 
Christian Association will be held 
Memorial Day. This picnic is an an- 
nual affair held at the end of each 
achOOl ytar, and we hope that tin- 
year's picnic will be as successful as 
the past ones have been. 

The social committee is in charge of 
Jack Walsh. Other members are Betty 
Albury and Blair Heaton. Announce- 
ments will be made as soon as possible 
concerning the time and place; but, in 
the meantime we hope you fellow stu- 
dents who do not belong to the S. C. 
A. will plan to go along with us. 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1940 

THE SUSQUEH ANN A ^fp MUSE OR AMUSE" Slf^"" 

^rnel^L^ Field trips seemed to be the order of his classmates to Jitterbug Instead of ^TrISgV'caRGO is a violent 

intervals as required by the Post Office Department. of things in the last week. Dr. Scud- ladies of forty years and three hundred melodrama, of nine sinister men who 

! . — ■ der's zoology class went on a trip down pounds? escape from a tropical prison off the 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, 42. Circulation Manager. tQ the igland and everywnere else n where was Knapp while McCord Soutn American coast, fight their way 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. where bugg and gucn are found - n & was ' dancing teacher? through the jungle and, joined by a 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States, radius of five miles. So hungry were While those who nave been making dance-hall girl make off for the main- 
Member of National College Press Association. some of the hikers when they got back d use of their Ume j ire into land and freedom m a sloop. Death 

mir w^v that they 1Uerally t0 ° k P °° r Pellman ' s or all of the answers to the above let strikes ast and furiously as only our 

THE STAFF lunch away from him while they wait- make a linle fidd tri t0 t a reach their haven but to these four 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER e d for theirs from the kitchen. Dr. „ limDse of ■•criminal at Large" from has come somethm g besides freedom. 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE Scudd er entered into the spirit of Lckstace The drama gr0WS ° Ut ° f the men ' S 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner things by Duving everyone ice cream. . _ battle for the smiles of the cheap cyn- 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert Dr • Pennsylvania historv class " 1S S]X mmute u s be / ore curtain time. ical little ent ertainer, Julie, superbly 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk e eastern - penn _ Mr. Freeman is busily applying Sher- and realistically done by j oa n Craw- 
Sports Editor cSree M«oS3S "vlvania. slight trouble was experienc- ^make-up. The stage manager M ford . The four survivors of the s i oop 

Staff Photographer George Macyuesten • *"• D ,. orm . „ . ~ ron ir . sending a posse after George MacQues- inrl , lrip r i ark Gable Ian Hunter Al- 

Reporters: Margaret Grenoble, '40; Anne Hill, '40; Virginia Mann, '40; G. Rob- ed in keeping Rotheimel and Orso to- and . g Qne g 1 "^^ J*^ 1 **™ 1 "' A1 

art Booth. -41; Miriam Garner. '41; Merle Hoover. '41; Jane Hutchinson, 41; terested to history when bert Dekker, and Paul Lukas. 

Eleanor Smith, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt. '41; Blair Heaton, 42; That is to say nothing of any of the » "* * problem v . A „ M 

Ruth Schwenk '42- Willard Sterrett. '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Cor- unscheduled, but nevertheless interest- ™ 1 , / ain . goes up ' f A , ' £L !yl c ^™ Fr,da y. Ma y 24 

yVil '43; Marv Cox, 43; Ella Fetherolf.' "43; Charles Gundrum, "43; Dan ing , fleld trips! child shows up and after he scenery DR KILDARE . S STRANGE CASE 

MacCartney. '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Williamson, '43. Seems t0 me tnat j hea rd a faint cre ™ 1S shooed ° n, _"\ e cunain ™**> is another yarn about the young Dr. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner rumor _ remind me to look into its au- and , tne die ls 4 cast u Things settle down Kildare, although not quite as fresh 

Advertising Manager Paul Shoemaker thenticitv _ of exams Just to keep in backstage to the business of entrance and interesting as the pre vious films to 

Business Assistants: Delphine Hoover. Robert MacQuesten, Stanley Stonesifer, ' • present cues and the sma11 amount of Prompt- this series Nevertheless, the picture 

Rex Sunday. Frank Morgan, Dorothy Weder, Frank Corcoran «ep in . '-.current in 6 needed - ° ff and on some of th f provides absorbing entertainment, es- 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. P. I. Reitz. the ^ Joining quiz current foUowing remarks m he&M . w jV^ ^ tnose B wn0 like stories of 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1940 1. why does Howard Dye claim that do you have the chocolates?" "Three the medical p rofess ion. The leading 

■ ■ h e is a victim of circumstances? P a S es for >' our cue ' wmie - . ° lv f, roles are taken by Lew Ayres, Lionel 

SUSQUEHANNA'S BEST WISHES 2 Why has Mendie been careful Cad y the ke ^ for the nandcuffs - Barryrnore> and Loraine Day. 

Within the next few weeks Miss Barbara L. Kruger, mem- »W «£, »" she has _t f«£»il^ «** ■* i " " 

ber Of the Susquehanna faculty, Will finish her activities heie 3 WhQ were horse . back r i d i ng curtain, and right on time, thanks to Shirley Temple is starred to the 

to launch forth on a career Of matrimony. All Susquehanna Thursday and Sunday mornings? Burt. Ten minutes to shift— the boys spectacular technicolor production, 

..... . . , , , ,. ,, faM _,„ _„j ;„ „M C hincr 4 Whv did Billman fall off his observe Mr. Freeman's watchwords BLUEBIRD. The picture is a charm- 

joins in bidding our bride-to-be a fond iaiewell and in wishing ^^^^ i™ W eek? about shifting scenery, "quiet and ing fantasy of a dreamer's world, and 

for her that greatest Of treasures — happiness. 5 Wnere were sally and Blanche fast." "Brooks, Gilder, Totty, Tanner, n n e d with enchanting scenes which 

„,, x- , ._, „,j on the mornine of Mav 19? Ferraby, and Kelver— five minute warn- call forth all of the imaginative powers 

At this time Of her departure it IS fitting that we Should °V why was DicrMatthews looking ing." Thence on to, "Phil, is the stool in the human mind. If you enjoy pure 

evaluate the reforms that have been made during her two years for the coach so industriously Satur- out front?" "Do the lights on the an d light entertainment, don't fail to 

as dean of women. She has followed the theory that every man day afternoon? mantiepiece go on tottd. scene? »> Teg, see the bluebird. 

, vo $ 7 Where wftS Jack Maver last Sat- ail set/ u. «■•» v^auy, mc nguta, ... 

and woman Who comes to college IS a SOCial being, capable OI ^- t gnd why ^-^ p . ck thg ..wnere is MacQuesten?" "Spiggle sure Tuesday and Wednesday, 

living With Other college Students without too great restriction, Selinsgrove H all steps? is bringing down the house on his Mav 28 ' and 2 g 

until he has Shown himself to be unworthy. With this in mind, 8. Why is John Burke so popular laugh lines-so on it want upto 0*8 ms GIRL fr i D AY presents Rosa- 
uniii ne "da anuwii initio j -«-.,«, with the younger members of the curtain call when the cast noticed that lind Russe n as the star reporter and 
She has dealt more With the individual than With the group, Jj^oSrt Church? everything was ending on the right ex . wife of Cary Grantl managing edi- 
She has spent more time in giving helpful suggestions than in 9 To wnom was McCord giving jit- note, complete to the stage door tor wno tries t0 pre vent her marriage 
mptine out hard-and-fast discipline. By SO doing She has found terbug lessons Saturday night? Johnnies, Sechler and Sivick, waiting t0 Ralph Bellamy. Rosalind uncovers 
meimg uui iuuu aim w» u«* ? j » ■ , 10 Whv does n't McCord teach some at the old stage door. a political mystery on her final assign- 
it well to modify some of the old rules which remained from 1J - wn > aoeh ■ m ent. 

former years, in favor of a system in which a great part is play — — — — — — — 0/ ^ T T A^55 s 

ed by the student government body. This system has won the <<n 1— |[h (7^ A IVll Uo C^OLlV^ cross-section of 

acclaim of students, faculty, and parents. , graduation class 

S^ Well dear readers, this is the last We also bid farewell to the athletic (Continued from Page 1) 

time that I shall write my messages of teams for the year and leave behind her paren ts' family. 

WHEN IS A GIFT A GIFT? joy to you. It seems that this thing we not too bad a record except for the Burton Richards is one of those stu- 

■ FvPvvnnP nrnnaintpd with the oresent administration Of call school is going to be ended with a dismal failing of the tennis team. The dents who intend to just work Tn at . s 

Eveiyone acquainted witn tne piesem nnuninnuw ui series of tests C an you imagine such a baseball team has been good and also what Burt wantS) a job He was g0 . 

Senior gifts must be aware that it does not contain all tne at- thing? Well comes Thursday and you taken some nice road trips. I am told ing t0 take up flying, but "Poppa" 
tributes Of true giving We Should Choose One Of two alterna- will tnat on the last trip to New York ' Richards sternly thumbs down on that 

4-- . c+™ ooin™ tViJ wninv oift n aift or altpr the conditions Seeing as this is the end of the Klinger lived on hamburgers. They id s0 Burt just hopes Marriage? 

tives: stop calling the semoi gift a gift, oi aitei tne conditions j-« j ^.^ ft ^^ ^^ &n& m must have been potent and affected his ,. Certainly „ Children? 

Under which the grant is made SO as to make it a true gilt. tjng that everyone establish their credit head because he asked Gensel. the star Bim Qne$ Bm ^^ &nd the twQ 

Most probably we Should Choose the latter. relations for the next year and pay all moundsman, when John was going to Georges can be consider ed a cross sec- 

. their bills, debts and anything else you given John's sermon on the mound. tion of tne se venty-five students who 

At present we have a situation under Which almost every owe be it m0 ney or just a coke. And m looking over the yearbooks I find leave Susquehanna come Commence- 

department "goes OUt campaigning," as it were, to get a sum I think that the seniors above all else som e amusing with amazing signatures. ment Some will g0 to gra duate 

.JnLrl.^ in it hv thp opninrs At times these "bids" are should pay their debts ' Come ° n n0W ° ne leads me t0 wonder and l just schools. Some will get a job right now, 
appropiiated to It by the seniOlS. At times tnese OlOS arc Gracie why don . t you pay K napper the can't understand it. Just why did some will get married, and some may 

accompanied by lengthy briefs proving the validity and urgency m0 ney you owe him. Oh, I know, you Davis sign Action's book Honey Duck? g0 on relief seventy-five college-ma- 
Of the need. This practice is not in harmony With true gift are going to use that old dodge that i don't get it, do you? tured youngsters— that's all they are- 
gambling debts aren't legal and there- j near tnat lately Spec ht has been seem to realize that the serious life 
S lvin »- fore can't be collected, but Gracie taking t0 poe try and has even gotten they're coming up against and entering 
The seniors should be relied upon to Uncover true need doesn't your conscience hurt you? Heapie into the habit of reading sev- into must be taken with a grin and a 
_, .. u „ ooo,,™^ oe t,.„ tinat npoacinnallv tViPrP Kna PP er - l 8 et a coke lf sne pays y0U ' eral verses to her over the phone so wisecrack, as well as determination 

Of course, it can be assumed as tiue that occasionally theie which , doubt ^ can go ^ s]eep u ft the poems or and high courage JVs a refreshing 

Will be a Class dominated by radicals to the extent that the gift m a couple days now we all shall be just the sound of tnat soft smoo th sight to see them, confident. Maybe 
Will SO to a pi'Oiect not Of most Ultimate value to the school; ringing out to our last dances of the voice of a dearly beloved? ifs thei r college education. Maybe it's 

tn niPVPnt this t mav be necessai'V that there be some Check year , N ° ?°? WC J? T^Z^i They tell me that on last Sunday, their inherent resilence of character, 
to pi event this it may De necessaiy tnat tneie De bunie uitx* couples and a i s0 a few of the old. I BJU c ^ me down and invited Emie and whaUrer it is, it's good, and it's theirs, 

valve to operate in SUCh cases. hear that Norry isn't coming back for Junch yfhQ eyer said ^^ they . re susquehannans, and they'll 

• +u the dance so we may presume that Nye .; , . ' FrniP didn 't think so soon be Alumni ... of the class of 1940. 

Another point incongruent with true gift giving is the pro- will De with Peg . threes^ crowd. Ernie didnt mm so g 

posed practice of giving the gift early in the senior year so that ^st Friday night a very "**£* comes for me t0 bid a sad commencement week 

it may be used by the Seniors before graduation. This, tOO, if ^v were all good. In ?act paced bv farewell. To all the departing seniors BIDS FAREWELLTO 40 

practiced, WOUld destroy the fine tradition Which Should aCCOm- that act0 r of actors, Spiggie, what else I say, "Come back soon," and wish you .continued from Page 1) 

,, • • i- . a l v, ~i„„~ m „iJ t v,f»v hpp wTint T want to know all the best luck in the world and can 

pany the giving Of a gift by each Class. L w hv didn S™ L wash to. arm honestly sav it has been a pleasure to from Selinsgrove Hall. 

•4. a * y scnieig wasn ms arm _ . h Commencement exercises 

Can we not get back to the true gift giving spirit and pro- before flashing those signals on the knoj >°u. To th e ^ jert of you ^U be 

r, stage Perhaps he was too busv being seeing vou in tne column next jear. 

cedures? the chief carpenter though , failed t0 Yours truly, 12:30 p. m. Trustees' dinner. 

a see his name mentioned in the pro- P. S. Gracie, won't you please pay The class day exercises on Friday in 

gram in that capacity. up before you leave? charge of Robert Sander, will include 

r»i>n»'iri i Tf» i\i r Mi vi miii'v. musical selections, reading the class 

FAREWELL 1U OIK BEN1UHS — historv and prophesv. and the presen- 

With this issue THE SUSQUEHANNA ceases publication << CT'TT? T) T TO /^T T A T'T'Th T? " tation of tne gift of th class of 1940 

for the year. Before we close the publication year we wish to jl llVlV U 1 V^J~lx\ 1 1 Hlv which will be made by class President 

•^ , . u . j«w«» +„ tu* - Louis Baylor and accepted by Presi- 

offer our congratulations and extend our best wishes to the dent Q Morris Smith 

.«.«».. „,i-,^ looi-o the. QncniiPhnrmn rnnkd this snrinF "Now if my heel goes in this way, ence. After a few miles of warm-up ' 

seniois who leave the Susquehanna lanks tms spnng. ^ ^ j ^ ^^ j j mgoing? „ Ken sarted tne ball rolhng for a gallop Saturday will be officially -Alumni 

The graduation Of a Class from college may be likened to 'No, Jay, you've got to look over the an d b) no time at all the group was ° n [ vers f ty Thea^GuiW wTprSnt 

the leaving home of a member of a family— it is accompanied [JJJ ™ i ^ ^erT^'amVing?^ 611, strcwn from hin t0 hil1 " There was "Criminai-at-Large" as the Alumni 
by the breaking of many ties of friendship and association and 1 what? _ An eany season fishing onl y one hitch--snowbaii." The only day play. 

leaves a Strange sense Of loneliness and increased responsibility party? Hardly so-just a crew of be- time when he ran was .as is. para- The Reverend Henry H. Bagger, D.D., 
itavra a ^ian B c ou^v u r j dinners flirtintr dantierouslv with some doxicallv enough, consistent with work of Pittsburgh, Pa., will deliver the bac- 
on those remaining. This feeling bears especially heavily upon J^J^* S future meals par- horses, when he regained sight of the calauraate sermon on Sunday morning, 
the juniors since they are most Closely connected With the sen- taken of in .. ye olde man tle manner." stables. Were sorry, Bing, next time Dr. Bagger is president of the Pitts- 
iors This feeline the Class of 1941 has toward the present sen- But of all the greenhorns, one must you can have Punch-he wont shake burgh synod of the Lutheran church, 
juia. iiwa i«»"6 ww w" .,,,,,. , 14 . j -ulmit that with a barrel a little prac- vour hair out. The four o'clock service on Sunday is 

iors. The graduate, in turn, should feel a lingering loyalty and ^ r change inot shortof revolutlon . The report for the day iisted only the annual one held at the grave of the 

fealty to the institution from Which he goes SO Strong that he ary deB rees> in his pedal appendages, one casualty— a very inopportune di- late David Day and. as in former years, 

Will look forward to COminQ back Often. We Sincerely hope the and slight alterations in the ana- vorce granted to— excuse me— imposed is under the direction of the 8. O A. 

;„,";;, 10 ° n ^ oUp fhiQ o ^u tomicnl structure of the horse, even U pon Mr. Billman by Miss Lou. Im- At five, the Vesper service will include 

members of the Class Of 1940 make this a piactice. ^ Billman it „ poKsiWe to make a a i in the amazement which one would a program by the faculty of the Con- 

Memben Of the Class Of 1940, the Students, faculty, and competent rider. experience in speeding past a horse servatory o^ Musi c aid J d f ^ Motet 

administration of Susquehanna j0 in in wishing you those full ^^c. = miles . the ^ ^^^ Ttfrr^T'S S 

measures Of happiness and success for Which your years spent d oubtedly very inviting on a cool, dew- What would you assume to be the President Fred P. Corson of Dickin- 

here have prepared VOU borne morning, as was last Wednes- predicament of the latter?— You're son College will present the commence- 

11 J day when this party "took to the leath- right! However, one cannot overlook ment address on Monday. In addition 

S ci ' the ability displayed by this certain to the conferring of degrees, announce- 

With Burt, Bickie, Snookie, Ken, rider in relaxing his body so as to fall ment of honors will also be made. 

With this issue THE SUSQUEHANNA ceases publication for Bing Don Dan and Red our party be tween the rock piles, and not upon s 

the Spring season and Will begin again in September. was complete In both style and expert- them! —Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 









c 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



SUSQUEHANNA HOST FOR P. I. A. A. Track Team Downed —i ~W 

ANNUAL DISTRICT TRACK FINALS By Albright Runners SI Td II U 



Compliments of 

KLINE'S 

MEAT MARKET 

E. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Williamsport Wins Class A Meet with Total of 
77 Ponts; Kulpmont Wins Class B With Total 
of 88% Points 



Last 



Saturday Susquehanna played i f A* a ] fl Qrtlit C^mckd 

host to thirteen different high schools, \ ^Wtaia kJ[JlIl \JalllCO 



Golis and Breen Win 33 Points for 
Albright; Richards Loads S. U. Scor- 
ing; MacQuesten and Templin Win 



who were competing in the annual 
Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic 
Association track meet. 

The state of Pennsylvania is divided 
into twelve main districts, Susquehanna 
being located in the fourth. Each of 
these districts holds a track meet to 
determine the two top high schools in 
the district, who will compete in the 
state-wide finals next week at 
State, for the naming of state 
champion. The high schools are di- 
vided into two groups, Class A, and 
Class B, the difference being that Class 
A represents those school of 400 or 
more enrollment. Class A was repre- 
sented by such schools as Williamsport, 
Bloomsburg, Jersey Shore, Mount Car- 
rnel, Sayre, and Berwick. Class B in- 
cluded schools from Athens, Canton, 
Kulpmont, Mansfield, Selinsgrove, 
Troy, and Wellsboro. 

Williamsport won Class A by a mar- 
gin of thirteen points, having a total 
of 77, while Mount Carmel took sec- 
ond with 64. In Class B, Kulpmont 
won by a wide margin, with 88 3 4 points 
and Troy in second place with 48' 2 
points. 

In the morning, elimination trials 
had to be run in heats, due to the fact 
of the large number of entries in the 
dashes and hurdles, but in the after- 
noon the main events took place. A 
few of the more outstanding events 
were the 100 yard dash, Class B, in 
which Parnell of Troy took first place 
with the fast time of 9.8 seconds, the 
half mile relay in which Williamsport 
took a first place in the extremely fast 
time of 1:37.1, and the 880 yard dash 
won by Kulpmont, made spectacular 
by the daring sprint of Maynard of 



With Upsala, Rutgers 



Krouse Hurls Pritchardites to 9-2 
Victory at East Orange; Kaltreider 
Scores Only Local Run at Rutgers 



The Susquehanna University Cru- 
Penn I sader baseball team, in a three day 
track j trip, May 13, 14, 15, picked up a win 

and a loss to climax their seasonal 

trip to New Jersey. 

Krouse pitched the entire game at 
East Orange, N. J., and allowed the 
hosts to accumulate only 5 hits, while 
the visitors took 12, to completely 
swamp the Upsala College nine, 9-2. 

In a fast seventh inning the Crusad- 
ers picked up three runs when Lewis 
came to the plate only to pop a fly to 
center field for the first out. Krouse 
arrived at first through an error of the 
shortstop, Isaacs singled, and Zuback 
came to the box to smash out a three 
bagger forcing Krouse and Isaacs 
across the plate. On a single by Ford, 
Zuback tallied. 

A rush started in the ninth inning, 
when Lewis cracked a two bagger to 
center field, and Isaacs doubled to 
bring in Lewis. Ford walked and on a 
pitch stole to second, when Zeravica 
singled to bring him in. Kaltreider 
walked, forcing Zeravica to scond, and 
Wolf, substituting for Schlig, smashed 
out a double to bring in Zeravica. 
Zavarich popped a fly to shortstop to 
retire the side. 

At Rutgers University, May 15, the 
New Brunswick team handed a defeat 
to the visitors to the tune of 5-1. Al- 



though the Crusaders picked up 7 hits, 
Troy, who came up from sixth position I they were scattered and no threat could 



to take a second place. 
Class A 

100 Yard Dash, won by Downey, Mt. 
Carmel. Time 10.2 sec. 

220 Yard Dash, won by Neville, Wil- 
liamsport. Time 22.5 sec. 

440 Yard Run, won by McCarty, Wil- 
liamsport. Time 52.4 sec. 

880 Yard Run, won by Pearilli, Sayre. 
Time 2:04.8 min. 

Mile Run, won by Van Houten, Ber- 
wick. Time 4.43.5 min. 

200 Yard Low Hurdles, won by Shet- 
ler, Williamsport. Time 23.9 sec. 

120 Yard High Hurdles, won by Nev- 
ille, Williamsport. Time 15.2 sec. 

880 Yard Relay, won by Williamsport. 
Time 1:37.1 min. 

1 Mile Relay, won by Williamsport. 
Time 3:36 min. 

between Muirhead, 
Leonetti, Mt. Car- 
7". 

won by Muirhead, 
2'2 M . 
Buczynski, 



be made. 

The lone run was tallied in the sec- 
ond inning when Zeravica made out 
on a pop fly to third, Kaltreider walk- 
ed and Schleig doubled to put the ran 
across. 

Box scores: 
Susquehanna AB R H E 

Isaacs, 3b 5 1 

Zuback, cf 3 1 

Ford, 2b 5 1 

Zeravica, c 4 1 1 

Kaltrider, ss 2 1 

Wolf, rf 3 

Schleig, rf 1 1 

Gensel, p 4 2 

Lewis, lb 4 C 2 

Zavarich, If 4 1 



Shot Put, tie 
Bloomsburg, and 
mel. Distance 44 

Discus Throw, 
Bloomsburg. Distance 141' 

Javelin Throw, won by 



Mt. Carmel. Distance 155' 1 i". 

Pole Vault, won by Van Houten, Ber- 
wick. Height, 10' 9". 

High Jump, tie between Leiby, 
Bloomsburg, and Hagerman, Williams- 
port. Height, 5' 8V'. 

Broad Jump, won by Neville, Wil- 
liamsport. Distance 19' 9 V. 
Class B 

100 Yard Dash, won by Parnell, Troy. 
Time 9.8 sec. 

220 Yard Dash, won by Wilson, Kulp- 
mont. Time 23.4 sec. 

440 Yard Run, won by Morgan, Can- 
ton. Time 56.6 sec. 

880 Yard Run, won by Curtis, Kulp- 
mont. Time 2:10.1 min. 

1 Mile Run, won by Judge, Mansfield. 
Time 4:44.6 min. 

120 Yard Low Hurdles, won by Bene- 
detto, Kulpmont. Time 14.2 sec. 

880 Yard Relay, won by Kulpmont. 
Time 1:39 min. 

1 Mile Relay, won by Troy. Time 
3:49 min. 

Shot Put, won by Jones, Kulpmont. 
Distance 46' 1". 

Discus Throw, won by Jones, Kulp- 
mont. Distance 120' 9 V. 

Javelin Throw, won by Jones, Kulp- 
mont. Distance 150' 1". 

Pole Vault, won by Hewitt, Troy. 
Height 10' 9". 

High Jump, tie between Flickinger, 
Selinsgrove, and Palmer, Mansfield. 
Height 5' 7 V. 

Broad Jump, won by Smith, Selins- 
grove. Distance 19' 2V. 
S 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



Totals 35 1 7 4 

Rutgers AB R H E ! 

Schanks, ss 4 1 2 1 ! 

Maclnnis, lb 5 1 1 

Brock, 2b 3 1 ' 

Cooke, rf 4 2 

Kuhn, If 4 1 

Jose, 3b 3 1 

R. Freeman, cf 3 

Dwvlet, c 4 

Perkins, p 4 2 3 



Totals 34 5 10 1 



Susquehanna AB R 

Isaacs, 3b 5 2 

Zuback, cf 4 

Ford, 2b 4 



Zeravica, c 5 

Kaltreider, ss 4 

Wolf, rf 2 

Schleig, rf 2 

Zavarich, If 5 

! Lewis, lb 4 

j Krouse, p 4 



H 

2 
1 
I 

1 
I 

1 
1 


1 

n 



Totals 

Upsala 

Roberts, 3b 5 

Ritchi, lb 4 

Becker, ss 3 

Freedman, If 3 

Freiberg, 2b 3 

Schaff er, cf 4 

Vallorani, If 4 

Mears, c 2 

Melin, p 2 



..39 9 

AB R 








I) 
i 
1 


1 



12 

H 


2 



1 

2 





2 
E 
1 
1 










(Continued from Page 1) 
here. Miss Kruger said that she "could 
conceive of no situation in which an , 
administrative office could have had 
more cooperation since she has been ' 
here. There is a decided growth on 1 
the part of students in assuming re- j 
sponsibilities in making this a better 
community." She expressed the hope i 
that we will extend the same friendly 
welcome to her successor as they did to 
her. 

All the students sincerely wish Miss : 
Kruger happiness and extend their : 
grateful and hearty thanks to her for j 
the fine things she has done for every- 
one. 

S 

Yes B.ut This Is 1940! 

"You should marry, my dear girl. ! 
Take this advice from an experienced ; 
woman ! " 

"Yes, Mrs. Brown, but until an in- 1 
experienced man tells me that, there's I 
nothing I can do about it!" 



T H 



Totals 31 



54 2 



Rutgers game: 

Two base hits: Schleig, Schank, 
Perkins. 

Left on bases: S. U. 11, Rutgers 9. 

Base on balls: off Gensel 3, off Perk- 
ins 4. 

Thre-base hits: Zavarich, Perkins. 

Struck out: by Gensel 1. Perkins 8. 



VICTORIA SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

COLLEGE WORK OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Private Booths While U Walt 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
FREE 

Shoe Shine Parlor 

NEXT TO GOVERNOR SNYDER 



Coach Stagg's track team met Al- 
bright yesterday afternooon at Al- 
bright Stadium, Reading, and lost by 
a score of 79 1-3 to 48 2-3. The meet 
was closely contested throughout, the 
advantage going to Albright as a re- 
sult of the outstanding work of Breen 
and Golis, who garnered 18 and 15 I 
points, respectively. The locals were 
weakened also by the absence of 
Pritchard, versatile sprint and hurdle 
man. 

Phil Templin turned in a fine per- 
formance in the shot, heaving the ball 
37' 4' b" for a first place. Wolfgang 
j continued to show his ability in the 
I distance runs by snatching a second 
in the two mile. Burt Richards came 
through with a first and two seconds 
to lead the locals in scoring. 

Bob MacQuesten lost first in the mile 
event to Golis in a slow race because 
of uneven timing. Later in the half 
mile run he and his brother outclassed 
the field to win first and second in 
inverse order. 

Summary of events: 

Mile run: won by Golis (A); Mac- 
Questen <S> second; Gagle (A) third, 
time 5.08.3 min. 

440 yd. dash: won by Breen (A); j 
Shusta (S) second, time, 52.4 sec. 

100 yd. dash: Won by Breen CA); 
Heaton (S) second; Bitting (A) third. 
Time, 10.2 sec. 

120 yd. high hurdles: won by Sehl 
; (A); Richards (8), second; Myers (S), 
i third. Time, 18.5 sec. 

880 yd. run: Won by G. MacQuesten 
(S); R, MacQuesten <S), second; Kil- 
lany (A), third. Time, 2:17.1. 

220 yd dash: Won by Breen (A) ; 
Boland (A), second; Deardorf <S>, 
third. Time, 22.6 sec. 

2 mile run: Won by Golis (A) ; Wolf- 
gang (*), second; Gigli (A), third. 
Time, 11:25.1. 

220 yd. low hurdles: Won by Rich- 
ards <S); Myers (|) and Boland (A) 
; tie for second and third. Time. 28.6 sec. 

Shot put: won by Templin (g); Derr 
1 A) second; Popelka <A> third. Dis- 
tance, 37, 4 V. 

Discus: won by Golis (A); Popelka 
<A>, second; Templin iS), third. Dis- 
■ tance, 114' 4'. 

Broad jump: won by Bidding <A>; 
Richards (|) second; Heaton (Si third. 
Distance, 20' 11V. 

Pole vault : won by Breen and Kochel 
1 tie; Learn <S>, Musser (S>, and Pe- 
trucka 1 A) tied for third place. Height, 
10' 6". 

Javeline: won by Johnson (A); Baum 
<A>, second; Warner <S) third. Dis- 
tance, 152' 11". 

High Jump: won by Michaels (A) 
and Warner <S) tie; Heaton <S) third. 
Height, 5' 10". 

S 

MISS BARBARA KRUGER 
TO MARRY THIS JUNE 



r a i 

sunbury 



R I 



NOW PLAYING 

Joan Bennett 
George Raft 

"House Across the 
Bay" 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Wallace Beery 

"20 Mule Team" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

Tyrone Power 
Dorothy Lamour 
Edward Arnold 

"Johnny Apollo" 

WEDNESDAY ONLY 

George Brent 

"Adventures In 
Diamonds" 



Farmers National 
Bank 

Selinsgrove, Penna. 

We are Interested in a Bigger 
SUSQUEHANNA 

and a bigger and more progressive 
SELINSGROVE 



Let us Join hands in Making This 
Come True 



VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP 

Fryling Stationery Co. 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Penna. 

We Sell All Makes of Portable 

Typewriters 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

FRIDAY, MAY 24 

Lionel Barrymore 
Lew Ayres 

"Dr. Kildares 
Strange Case" 

SATURDAY, MAY 25 

Shirley Temple 

"The Bluebird" 

IN TECHNICOLOR 
MONDAY, MAY 27 

Russel Hayden 
Jean Parker 

"Knights of the 
Range" 

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY 

MAY 28 AND 29 

CARY GRANT 
ROSILAND RUSSEL 

"His Girl Friday" 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The ^&Katl Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



with 



Ralph Bellamy 

THURSDAY, MAY 30 

Stan Laurel 
Oliver Hardy 

"Chump at Oxford" 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



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SUNBURY — 



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Personally Selected 

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Sunbury. Pa. 



DIAMONDS WATCHES 

Have Your Watch Repaired Now. 

No Watch Too Small. All 

Work Guaranteed. 

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Compliments of 

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N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa 



PAUL R. KROUSE 

PAINTING, PAPERING AND 
INTERIOR DECORATING 

Phone 148-W 320 E. Walnut St 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



Watson town Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 

AND 

PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa. Paxtonvtlle, Pa 






PAGE FOl'R 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Please report any conflicts immediately to office. 



THURSDAY, MAY M 

8:00 a. m. - 10:00 a. m. 

St. 100 

Eng, Comp. i Freeman 

MWF 8) 
Eng. Lit. (TThS 9) 
American Lit. (A-F) 
Abnormal Psychology 

G. A. ::oo 

Eng. Comp. (Freeman 

MWF 9i 
Sng. Comp. (Wilson 

MWF 11) 
G. A. 301 
Eng. Comp. (Freeman 

TThS 1 1 I 
Eng. Lit. (TThS 11) 
St. 200 
Physiology 
Eng. Comp. (Wilson 

MWF 9) 
St. 201 
Amer. Lit. (G-Y) 



10:15 a. m. - 12:15 p. m. 

St. 100 

Greek Literature 

Business Law 

St. 200 

Social Psychology 

Roman Drama 

Beginning French 



2:00 p. m. - 4:00 p. m. 

St. 100 

Beginning German 

Surveying 

German Comp. & Conv. 

St. 200 

Inter. German 

Bookkeeping Methods 

G. A. 105 

Elementary Accounting 

G. A. 101 

Inter. Shtd. & Typ. 



As the Players Present Their Latest Production 



FRIDAY, MAY 24 

St. 100 

Art Appreciation 
Physical Chemistry 
International Law 
Introductory Physics 
Calculus 
St. 200 

French Romanticism 
Business English 
Introduction to 

Philosophy 
G. A. 101 
Office Practice 



St. 100 

Modern Social Problems 
English Fiction 



St. 100 

Analytic Geometry 
The Family 
Botany 

General Physics 
St. 200 

W. European History 
G. A. 300 
Public Speaking 
G. A. 101 

Shorthand & Typing 
Methods 




SATURDAY, MAY 25 

St. 100 

Bible (A-Ki 
History of Philosophy 
Comparative Anatomy 
St. 200 
Bible (L-P) 
Money & Banking 
G. A. 300 
Bible (R-W) 

MONDAY. MAY 27 

St. 100 

Qualitative Chemistry 
Insurance 
French Survey 
German Novelle 
St. 200 

Ancient History 
Pennsylvania History 
Sound 



St. 100 

Heredity 

Embryology 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



St. 100 

Economics 



TUESDAY, MAY 28 

St. 100 - 9:00 a. m. 

Zoology 

European Government 

Techniques of Teaching 

St. 200 

Salesmanship 

Intel-. Latin 

G. A. 105 

Inter. Accounting 



St. 100 

Intermediate French 
Organization of Athletics 
German Lang, & Lit. 



Radio 
G. A. 300 

American History 



St. 100 

Commercial Geography 
Ethics (A-H) 
Beginning Greek 
G. A. 300 

Ethics (K-Z) 
Transportation 



"Criminal -at -Large" Adjudged 
Success; To Be Repeated June 1 

Friday evening, May 17. the Theater line of Lebanons, was superb. 
Guild of Susquehanna University pre- I After a series of baffling murders, 
sented its second production of the Lord Lebanon seeks the help of Scot- 
year, "Criminal at Large." by Edgar j 
Wallace, in Seibert Chapel. This per- > 
formance marked a new peak in 
theater productions at Susquehanna | 
University. "Criminal at Large" was 
acclaimed by many as the best play i 
ever to be produced here. The audience 
was very deeply impressed by the per- 
formance. So once again, we thank 
Mr. James Freeman and the other 
members of the production staff for 
the splendid work which they have ac- 
complished. 

This blood-curdling murder drama 
in three acts centers about a series of 
murders committed in the house of 
Lebanon, a highly respected English 
family. The cast was very well-chosen, 
and all its members gave an excellent 
performance. Sherrie Williams as 
Lady Lebanon, and Forrest Heckert, as 
Lord Lebanon htr son u-prp very fine. 
Louise McWilliams as a frightened 
young lady, who was being forced into 
a marriage with Lord Lebanon because 
his mother wanted to perpetuate the 



WEDNESDAY'. MA Y 22, 1940 

land Yard. Paul Shatto as chief in- 
spector Tanner also gave an excellent 
performance. George Spiggle, as Ser- 
geant Totty, provided the comedy 
throughout the entire play. Other sup- 
porting members of the cast were: Bill 
Nye and Stan Baxter as American 
footmen in the house of Lebanon, Mary 
Emma Yoder as the housekeeper, 
George MacQuesten as a sergeant 
from Scotland Yard, and Lawrence 
Cady as a convict who supplies infor- 
mation about the mysterious murderer. 

An element of romance is introduced 
into the story when one of the ser- 
geants falls in love with the lovely 
Isla, as portrayed by Miss McWilliams. 

Murder, mystery, and romance com- 
bined into one, make this play thrilling 
and exciting. The scenery and light- 
ing effect used helped to create the 
gruesome and sinister atmosphere for 
the play. Credit is given to the scen- 
ery and lighting crew for this work. 
Members of the scenery crew were: 
Stephen Bergstresser, Don Critchfield, 
Kenneth Kinney, John Schleig, Bur- 
ton Richards, and Eugene Williams. 
The lighting crew was composed of 
Jack Mayer and Lawrence Cady. 

The technical staff of "Criminal at 
Large" consisted of Mr. Freeman as 
faculty advisor, Grace Fries as stage 
manager, Marie Edlund as prompter, 
Elizabeth Albury as general directorial 
assistant, and Philip Bergstresser as 
technical director. 

The second performance of "Criminal 
at Large" will be given Saturday, June 
1, in Seibert Chapel. All those who 
can should plan to attend this per- 
formance because it is a play which is 
truly fine and everyone will enjoy it. 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL CAFE 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



SelinsgTOve, Pa. 




SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



RAICHS 



BARBER 
SHOP 

Sanitary Service 
ONE PRICE FOR 

Hair Cuts „- 25c 



First National Bank of Sdins Grove 
Welcomes Students' Accounts 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 

St. 100 

Organic Chemistry 

Poet ry 

Public Finance 

St. M0 

General Psychology 

Q. A. Ill 

Elementary Shorthand 

FBIDAY, MAY 31 

St. 100 

Genera] Science 

(MWF sec 
General Chemistry 
(all i» 

St. :oo 

Gen Bel m i 'TThS sec.) 
ilo | 



St. 100 

Greek Life 

Auditing 

Trigonometry 

Horace 

St. 200 

Educational Psychology 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



St. 100 

Pers. Hygiene <A-M> 
O. A. 300 

Pers. Hygiene (N-Z) 



Penn 5c to $1 Store 

(Member Ben Franklin Store) 

Full Line of 

SUSQUEHANNA STATIONERY 

Corner of Market and Pine Streets 



BKESSLER'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Krithlcy's 

sikh: shim: 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury. P»- 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For information ncMress: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthorn 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 



Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Sellnsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co -educational college offering the following standard 

courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

1 RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B., B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD. ( Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



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I 



Highlights j 

Of the Week 

For the benefit of our new friends, j 
may we say that this column is de- \ 
voted in each issue to a review of the 
activities of interest for the coming 
week. 
Freshmen to meet 

The freshmen and transfer students 
are asked to meet in Steele Science 
Hall, room 100, this evening at 6:45 
p. m. 
Dormitory men to hear Gait 

Dean Gait will meet the residents 
of Hassinger and Selinsgrove Halls in 
Steele Science, room 100, at 6:45 p. m. 
Thursday evening for the purpose of 
outlining the dormitory government 
for the year. 
Pep rally Friday evening 

The pep committee has announced 
that the traditional pep rally held each 
year before the first home game will 
be held Friday evening. Details will be 
announced soon. 
Parents to be guests of University 

Plans are under way to make the an- 
nual Parents' Day program on Satur- 
day a "bigger than ever'' affair. The 
program includes: 

11:15 a. m. - special chapel service 
under leadership of S. C. A. 

12:15 p. m. - luncheon in Horton Din- 
ing Room. 

2:00 p. m. - grid game on Crusader j 
Field 

4:30 p. m. (after game) - tea in 
Seibert Parlors 
Crusaders open season 

Coach Stagg's grid machine will get 
under way Saturday afternoon at 2 
p. m. on the local field when they face 
the Buffalo University eleven. Susque- 
hanna defeated Buffalo last season, 
6-0. 
Ross Stover to address S. C. A. 

Rev. Ross Stover, Philadelphia, will 
speak to a meeting of the S. C. A. 
Monday evening at 8 p. m. in Seibert 
Social Rooms. The meeting is open to 
both members and non-members. 
S 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXXXVII. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SF.L1XSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY. SKPIT.MBKK 25. l!)l~ 



Number 7 



Susquehanna Announces Four Changes in Faculty and Administrative Staff for the Coming Year 





i 



-s»s 



% 







WALTER B. KELLY 



ALMA M. JENSEN 



DR. H. A. HEATH 



MARTHA M. I1EIN, R.N. 



University Prepares Faculty Newcomers EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION OPENS WITH 
To Receive Parents Get Personality Quiz INCREASED STUDENT ENROLLMENT 



Chapel Service, Luncheon, Grid 
Game, and Tea to Highlight Annual 
Event Saturday 



14 Girls Chosen for 
Cottage Innovation; 
Garner Elected "Prexy" 

The second cottage in faculty row 
has been accommodated for the hous- 
ing fourteen upper-class girls under 
frhe supervision of Miss Laura Reed. 
During the summer renovations were 
made; new maple furniture was 
bought; and now a very comfortable 
and home-like atmosphere is the re- 
sult. 

This is a new and interesting experi- 
ment in community living and the girls 
have been chosen on the basis of their 
proven dependability and truthworthi- 
ness in addition to their ability to live 
congenially with others. The girls who 
are living in the cottage are: Ruth 
Baer, Jean Bowers, Mary Cox, Blanche 
Forney, Miriam Garner, Nancy Griese- 
mer, Cornelia Grothe, Dorothy Haffner, 
Mary Lee Krumbholz, Fern Lauver, 
Lorraine Turnbach, Elizabeth Walters, 
Dorothy Williamson, and Evelyn Wil- 
liamson. 

Miss Miriam Garner, senior, was 
elected president of the group at a 
business meeting Monday evening. 

The Administration found it neces- 
sary to make this arrangement of 
housing due to the overflow of stu- 
dents in Seibert Hall, and it is hoped 
that this will prove to be a worthwhile 
experiment. 



Saturday, the twenty-eighth, marks 
an important date in the fostering of 
closer relations between Susquehanna's 
students and their parents. It is our 
annual Parents' Day, for which per- 
sonal invitations are now being sent 
out to parents. 

Many parents are expected — drawn 
not only by the enticement of m 
their sons and daughters, but also by 
the appealing program which has been 
arranged. 

The series of gala events will be 
opened at 11:15 by a chapel convoca- 
tion at which time President Smith 
will deliver his greetings to the parents. 
The Crusader Quartette will furnish 

After the luncheon at 12:15 in the 
college dining-room, the parents are 
invited to attend the opening football 
game of the season between Susque- 
hanna and Buffalo. A tea in honor of 
the parents, to be held in the parlors 
of Seibert Hall after the football game, 
will climax the activities of the day. 



A Letter to the Alumni 



Dear Alumni: 

The present staffs of The Susque- 
hanna have embarked upon a program 
of expansion for the coming year. We 
hope to make this publication a vital 
part of every branch of our college 
family. We shall attempt especially to 
make the newspaper more appealing 
to our alumni friends; with this in 
mind we shall, through the cooper- 
ation of the Alumni Secretary, print 
week-to-week tidbits of news of in- 
terest to our former schoolmates. Al- 
so, we are extending personal invita- 
tions to the alumni to subscribe for the 
publication. Subscriptions are payable 



Sophs Sleep Through First 
Successful Getaway in Five Years 



Maybe you've been just as curious as 
I've been concerning the all impor- 
tant question, "What are our new fac- 
ulty members like?" There have been 
write-ups in the local newspapers about 
their various achievements; we were 
formally introduced to them at the 
Faculty Reception; but, now. we are 
to find out whether, in addition to all 
this information, they are like us folks. | 

In my contacts with her during the 
past two weeks, I have found Miss ; 
Alma Jensen a gracious and thoughtful 
personality, and she was most oblig- 
ing when I started my quiz "Infor- 
mation Please." Dean Gait mentioned 
that Miss Jensen came from the "wild 
and woolly West"; but Miss Jensen 
adds that Is neither Swede nor 

Norwegian which is the type of per- 
son the uninformed Easterner asso- 
ciates with the West. 

'■The enmuus is nerfectlv beautiful, 
especially with the beauty of the sur- 
rounding country and this lovely fall 
weather." Miss Jensen said "The stu- 
dents are to be congratulated on their 
opportunity to go to a school where the 
standards and contacts are as fine as 
here." She expressed her approval of 
| the fine spirit the students have, es- 
pecially the kindliness and helpfulness 
■ with which the old students meet the 
freshmen. "I must comment upon the 
I favorable attendance shown at the 
i Vesper Services and the sincere and 
efficient manner in which the S. C. A. 
conducts its meetings." 

"I have never experienced such un- 
usually good food for a dormitory din- 
ing room. HOME-MADE ice cream 
three times a week ! " 

As you, no doubt, have noticed, Sei- 
bert is blooming with flowers, and we 
attribute much of this to Miss Jensen 
who is very appreciative of beautiful 
flowers. 

To those of you who have been care- 
less and caught a cold, Miss Bertha 
Hem needs no further introduction. 
My friends, Miss Hein is the congenial 
and merry lady in the white uniform 
who asks you to say, "Ahh." Miss Hein 
admits that everything is very favor- 
able and there is a nice student body, 
(Continued on Page 4» 



President Smith Presides at Convocation, Dr. 
Paul E. Witmeyer Speaks; Tests, S. C. A. Party, 
Faculty Reception Climax Orientation Week 



Men's Student Council 
Throttles Frosh Hazing 



♦■ 



On Monday. September 9, the 104 
i members of the clan of 1944 arrived 
:on campus to begin their four 



Monday morning after chapel. Glenn 
Mussel', president of the Stui 
Council, di Ivei erbal warning to 

dbly too 
zealous in their endeavoi 
freshman regulation, the soph! bi i 
aboul 

fandwh u 

in. Sophomores maj i 
Freshmen who are disobeying the 
regulations, But that's all. unless the 

S 

Dunkelberger Gives 
Illustrated Lecture 



Their first 

: the 

ibly led by Dean 

I 

at 7:15 

.ned 

were given 

r a 

of the 

r as 

A pr hat 



Student of Local History Shows Open 
Meeting of Pi Gamma Mu That 
"Pennsylvania Has Everything" 



Oh Boy! Oh Boy! Have we got the 
jump on the sophomores? Yah Man! 
For the first time in five years the 
Freshman Class has been able success- 
hilly to promote i getaway, The how's 
and when'l are simple enough to ex- 
plain—Yes. simple enough for even a 
sophomore to understand. 

First let's explain to the sophomores 
what has happened, for some of 
them must still be in the dark M to 
OUT procedures. Well, it all happened 
between 6 and 6:30 o'clock in the wee 
small hOUri of the morning. 

It WM arranged that the election 
should be held in the day -student room 
Of Seibert Hall on the morning of Sep- 
tember 17. In order that the sopho- 
mores, who were dead to the world, 
would not become suspicious of our 
plana, it was planned that separate 
bodies Of students were to leave their 
room for election, at various inter- 
nals, thus avoiding the confusion that 
was bound to have occurred if other- 
wise planned. 

Let'. : a i line RAH's for Jim Wert, 
the president-elect. Jim gave the boys 
the well known run-around. He had 
thetn Mattered from Millersburg to 
Bucknell, in fact most of the Marching 



party must have seen a large portion 
of Pennsylvania, for the sophomores 
were unable to discover the where- 
abouts of his seclusion. 

The "hunt" was carried out over a 
period of 24 hours, but Jim also stuck 
to his guns during that time. He I 
brave fellow and a good scout to have 
done what others might have frowned 
upon, and I'm sure even he will think 
It v.. is an easy task to out-smart the 
sophomoree, who have made us firmly 
believe that there is DC place like home. 
We must congratulate the upper 

men for taking the defeat In the 
manner In which they did Bo let me 
d to urn, now, the thank-you's 
from the bottom of our I or re- 

lieving us of our dress regulation 

week. I'm sure we aii all rateful 

Our consideration to us. no uin'ii r 

how small it was. it certainlj i 

injured your pride to have been 
defeated, outwitted, and shamed by the 
ihmen, 

Next year we will endeavor to show 
you how to execute an un urn 
getaway. May your knowledge be ever 
increased alter we have filled your 
empty cup of learning. Wait, thou 
sophomores, and we shall tench thee 
and thy companions many things. 



(ialt Presides at First 
Meeting* of Proctors 

The Men's Dormitories Committee 
met with Dean Russell Gait in his of- 
fice Monday evening for the purpotf Ol 
outlining the objectives for the year, 
The committee this year la made up of 
it-it!' students and ■ faculty chairman; 
the personnel is: Dr. Adam Smith, 
man; Philip Templin, Hassinger 
Hall i first floor i ; Blair Heaton. Bas- 
el Hall (second); Edwai 
era, 1 r 'third': Harry That< h- 

ve Hail, it la the duty of 
this ■ i < to it that the men': 

in the prop- 
er n: : Dean Gait was Instl 

:: the reaidenta of the men's dor- 

mitorii togi ther to explain the proctor 

em. 

Since three of the studenl proctors 

are new r Dean Gait took sev- 

minutet rei l< wing the hJ 
bad: , t-up. 

when he came here two 
ago. he found the order in the 
men's residences to be unsatisfactory. 
Criticisms came from all angles — stu- 
dents, faculty, and parents. 

continued on Page 4> 



An illustrated talk on the subject, 
"Seeing Pennsylvania," was given Mon- 
day evening at 7:00 in Steele Science 
Hall by Dr. George F. Dunkelberger. 

Using 150 pictures to verify his state- 
ment that "Pennsylvania has every- 
thing," Dr. Dunkelberger proved con- 
clusively that it is worth while for a 
Pennsylvanian to see his native state 
first. Proceeding from the campus of 
Susquehanna, he conducted his audi- 
ence on an imaginary tour to numer- 
ous spots of scenic and historic inter- 
est throughout the state. Apparently. 
he followed a pretzel-like route during 
the course of the journey which in- 
cluded such famous historical points 
M the Edison Hotel at Sunbury, Fort 
Augusta, the Priestley House at North- 
umberland, the Complain it Reserva- 
tion, the Oliver H. Perry Memorial, the 
Ephrata Cloisters—the only experi- 
ment in monasticism in this country 
the various sites of early forts, VaUe: 
e, the battlefields at Gettysburg 
and Great Meadows, as well as the 
birthplaces Of many notable men. 
"NatUTi ' W ml" was rev. 

by tfc ■ of Perm's Creek Valley, 

Grand Canyon of this state, the 
ware Water Gap. the Pocono 
Mountaii itient picturesque 

parka, hi and forests. A very 

inter! i ting part of the Join 
the visit to the rce Mine in the north- 
ern part of tin The :-•' 

thai it h nearly 

all tl ept durii. 

on. 
After Dr. Dunk' 
ll 
In, the Susquehanna campus. Dr. 
. few Inti 
. u auction of ■ 

I lomplanter tribe— the 

Thl • ' and informative 

lecture was given under the an 
of the Pi Gamma Mu. the nation 
cial science honor society of 8u 
lumna Univi rait 

l_s 

— Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



study at Busqueh 
mectin: together e 
afternoon at an ai 

Later there 
in English and 

the O] 

i ■ freshmen 
by i 
musical 

i Ident of the s. 

■ 

u ' 

Tuesday mornin more tests — 

psychological and ophthalmographic, 

, followed by an afternoon of reglstra- 
i tion. Relaxation came I I the form of 
j the annual S. C. A. freshman party at 
eight )). m. Cornelia Grothe, chair- 
j man of freshman activities, led the 
i festivities. There was a contest of 
j charades, and various autograph col- 
lecting contests. Dances such as the 
Paul Jones were chosen in order to 
stimulate mixing and that everyone 
might become better acquainted. The 
refreshment table was one of the most 
frequented spots in the gym. 

Reading tests Wednesday morning 
after which there was a meeting with 
Dean Gait on "The Differences be- 
tween High School and College Life." 
This meeting then divided into five 
smaller groups which met separately 
for conferences with seniors. The fol- 
lowing seniors took part in the dis- 
cussion: Marion Boyer, Jane Hutchin- 
son. Marion Crompton. Mary Emma 
Yoder. Faith Harbeson, George Bant- 
ley, Joseph Pasterchik, Paul Shatto, 
Karl Young, and Harry Thatcher. In 
the evening the respective student 
councils met with the freshmen to ex- 
plain the traditions of Susquehanna 
in regard to freshman conduct. 
At nine a. m. Thursday the entire 
(Continued on Page 4> 



Action by Faculty 
Discontinues Motel 



The Busquehani one 

oi the mi tandlng activities on 

I by 
act inn of the faculty in consultation 

or Ste\ - 
ens. and Dr. Ovrebo. Henceforth, the 
Motel Choir . 

men's quai 

by the facult) In i xplani Ion of the 
chan 
l. 1 urpose of the 

I choir in setl 
for choral mu rably 

ipllshed. 

Ol :«r- 
Ol num- 
in the I ■ 

3. Recurrin 
choir. 

4. 'i hi if extra-cur- 
ricular activities on the curricular ac- 
tivltiee. The d of practice 

on choir members cannot be 
waived for extra-cm ncular activities. 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINS GROVE, PA. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1940 

,__, _._-__. ~ T T ~ ^^ __._._ A twttvt a school tradition, had to be consulted regarding the tradition , _. . __ _-,._, 
THE SUSQUEHANNA rulinginsuchacase. MAY WE . . 

__ Irrespective of loyalty to our several classes, we must ad- QTTf" 1 PTTQl r r 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving. Christ- m ^ that the freshmen this year have evidenced a spirit Of unity * * ^ U *J vJ J^O 1 

mas. Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated degree seldom found in freshman Masses 

intervals, as required by the Post office Department. ana a ciass spirit to a degree seiaom iouna in iresnman classes. por bQth Qld and new readers of THE 

Subecription 12.00 a Year. Payabielo^axT,^lieelne^ 7 42. circulation Manager. This, we feel, is a healthy barometer of the successful manner SUSQUEH anna we would give a word 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Mat'er. in which the members of the Class already have adapted them- of explanation concerning the movie 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. Selves to the peculiar environment surrounding the freshmen. ^Xtto'iS'totoStSlS 

, Member of Na tional College Press Association. Again we sa y, congratulations! at the same time helpful to student 

THE STAFF - and faculty in selecting the movie he 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER < < T/^VT 1 A T 1 C f^sTS C "H"!^ A T7" C 5 > wishes to see^ We shall give the most 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE If ) h A H N C J 1 S 1 K A K S ^"m ^tw °Tt "" st . a , ement 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner J ^^ - 1 — ' x *-■— 'i^ V^ ■*- >^ J - J -^ J - a-lX ^y possible, whether it be positive or 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert ^ ^ negative. Only pictures which we con- 
News Editor Ruth Schwenk 0nce upon a time there was a Co _ Roommates, which Proves that they sider to be of especial interest will be 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrurn M whQ went t0 a college for both were no ordinary Boys. reviewed in detail; the others will be 

Staff Photographer . . .. . . . . . . .. ■ . . • . . . • . - . • • . George MacQuesten Blonde. Both were Very Talented. Gus was merely evaluated. 

Reporters: ^-^^^'^^^^^^^^^^ 11 L M ^ ? She came from New York City and a Wiz at writing Sonnets, and Adel- Wednesday, Thursday 

Hoover 41: Jane Hutchinson, 41 Kutn epecnt, ti, is.ennetn win, ii, * . . . ,, _, __ , rm,„„ T-»»-ii.n k,. -NTirrv,* 

Blair Heaton 42' Donald Bashore '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; she had Simply Wowed them in High bert could Sleep Through more noise They Drive by Night- 
Ella Fetheroff '43 • Dan MacCartnev, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- School. She was, for That Matter, do- than any other Fellow in College. Ida Lupino runs the gamut from 
liamson '43- Marjorie Wolfe, '43. ing a Pretty Fair Job of that Right Well, as was Stated Before, Gus and murder to mania in this supercharged 

Circulation Manager .' Maxine Heefner Now. Adelbert were Great Pals. melodrama of the trucking business. 

. . . Fred Warner she had what It Took, as long as it Then came That Day when all Good Her husband, Alan Hale, is king of 

Advertising Manageis Chester Shusta didn't take Too Much. Things Must End. tne racket and when she puts him out 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. Her Father was a Rotarian. Every Gus left College to drive a Truck for of the way (an extremely messy bit of 

' — WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 25 ~~1940~ summer he Spent a Week fishing at a Milk Company in Rochester. Then business) it puts George Raft in a 

! Flat Gulch, Rhode Island. Adelbert transferred to a School up in very, very bad spot. Raft seems des- 

WELCOME NEWCOMERS ' Her Aunt Minnie was an Evangel- Maine when his Father got a Job in tined to go to the chair until Miss 

Tn trip frpshmpn transfers and npw faculty and staff mem- ist and raised Dahlias and Canaries as Portland demonstrating "Easy-Do" Lupino goes stark, staring mad before 
10 the Iieshmen, tiansieiS, ana new iacuiiy ana Sian mem r Hobby _ tne Latter in ner Deluxe washing machines. your very eyes, my dear. Ann Sheri- 

bei'S THE SUSQUEHANNA hands the key Of welcome ! We are Trailer. After graduation Adelbert went into dan does a rather neat job as the little 

desirous that you find Susquehanna University an enjoyable Also attending This College were two business with his Father on a Strictly waitress who's got what it takes. 

, ~. ., ,„„„ . ,i„_ „„,, mM A, w Q Koii^tro +v>ot oc timo bovs who wore Great Big Orange S's Fifty-Fifty Basis. When his Dad made Friday 

and profitable place to live and woik. We believe that as time on thdr Manly chegts a sale he gave Adelbert one half of the Dark command- 

goes on you Will be moulded more and more Closely into the we will not Reveal what these let- profits. Claire Trevor and John Wayne, and 

Susquehanna family and into its tradition. We hope that none ters stood for. But you May Guess. The Co-Ed? Oh, she was the Girl they tell us it's very good. 

. , . ■■ in,,..! i„ • j„„j „+ i„„„f „„ „v,/i Q ,. One bov was a Blond and the other who used to sit between Adelbert and Saturday 

of you may leave us without having gained at least an undei- _ wdl he was g Blond> Too Gus in Introduction t0 Te aching, 10 Young Peopie- 

Standing Of and an appreciation for the work that we as an Their names were Adelbert and Gus. MWF. 20th Century-Fox gives us one last 

institution Of higher learning are trying to achieve. Adelbert was Quarterback on the Foot- Moral: If you want a Thing done look at little Shirley ; the farewell 

& & j b baU Team and Gus had gotten his let . well> Keep it in the Qven thirty min . would be indeed a sad one were it not 

» ter in Golf. utes Longer. for the excellent support of Jack 

WE AIM TO PLEASE The boys were Great Pals as well as —Joe Aesop. Oakie and Charlotte Greenwood. 

For the benefit of newcomers let us explain that THE SUS- * M T h?saint Takes Over- 

QUEHANNA is the official weekly publication of Susquehanna T . . riinrrh flivP« Manv Alumni fnntiniip George Sanders ' Wendie Barrie ' 
University, being produced entirely through the efforts of stu- J/ 1 ""*, ^nurcn Uives m dny Alumni tonunue Wcal of the .. Saint „ serles> a rather 

dents, it follows the policy of publicizing those events which Reception for Students Study; L. West Returns good murder t&mte. 

, , F. fr , ff ltri-'tf H AND— Confidentially, Flash Gordon 

are Of Vital interest to the Students, faculty, administration, ana Trinity Lutheran Church held its A large number of Susquehanna's 75 lands in a moat at the bottom of that 

alumni; and Of doing SO, if possible, in a manner Which Will annual student "Get-Together" for graduates of last spring are continuing tower from which they hurled him last 

maintain a spirit Of harmony among all concerned. students of Susquehanna University on their studies at law, theological, and week. Don't ever say this column 

' Thursday evening, September 19. The medical colleges. Gettysburg Theologi- doesn't get scoops. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA Staff wishes to make the newspaper prog ram was in the form of a college cal Seminary seems to lead the other Tuesday 

not Only a dispensing agent for the news Of the campus; we course. The students were divided in- schools in the number of Susquehanna Scatterbrain— 

j„u ;~ .jjui« +„ c QQ ^ u D „ nmQ vv, Q Hiiirvi tViv/Min-Vi wVii^Vi all to four groups, freshmen, sophomores, alumni entering it this year. Daniel They tell us that this picture was 

Wish, in addition, to see it become a medium thlOUgh which all .^.^ an / seniors and at £ 30 p m B ergstresser, Robert Fisher, Leon designed to take the public mind off 

groups Of our Susquehanna family may readily express their the party got into full sway, with Mr. Haines, Paul Orso, and Robert Sander the European war and it works equally 
Views With this in mind we invite all contributions regardless Grossman in charge as the dean of the are all attending Gettysburg; while well for the English tests and history 

of source; we assure you that all printable material received will co11 ^- . , _ SS^nS^to^TJS £ '"ST , * m , . 

/ r The courses included a psychology prospective ministers to diner ana at- The story concerns the efforts of a 

be given consideration. test a s i anguage course, an art course, tend Mt - Airv Seminary. studio press agent to place a newcomer 

Naturally, it is the Wish Of the Staff as well as the wish Of and the three old-fashioned R's,. Each William Gehron Jr. and John Upde- before his boss in the guise of a hill 

the readers that the paper be made as nearly perfect as possible class also chose their president and grove are both studying medicine at billy. Judy Canova gets mixed up in 

f,. ik* h v> tVi made U P c ^ ass cheers which could be the Jefferson Medical School; Virginia the thing and they don't find out that 

in every respect. TO this end, we Wish to urg our leaders wnetn- heard &t different times dur i ng the Mann is taking up library science at she can act until long after the audi- 

in every respect. To this end, we wish to Ul'ge our readers Wheth- evening. After the courses were com- Columbia; George Spiggle is attending ence has established her as a top line 

criticism Which may lead to the creation Of a better publica- P leted - refreshments were served to the the University of Cincinnati Law comedienne. 

J students. During the remainder of the School ; Andrew Clark is continuing his S 

tion. evening, the students got better ac- studies at Penn State; and John Drum- QiQ-rriQ AllYha Totfl T^ 

S quainted with each other and with heller has enrolled at Temple. u 1 t T\21 V 

MUST WE LOSE THE MOTET? the men and women of tne church. M iss Louise West, of Coaldale, Pa., JlOSt tO DeanSJ MlirSe 

The news section of this issue carries the announcement Receh^Beautv ^e cZToTml^^Z^T Z it was ten o'cioTkTnd an the s. a. i. 

that the Motet Choir Of Susquehanna University has been dis- 1^"* * v ^° VJ" V Commercial Education Department. girls were buzzing in their sorority 

banded. We express our very genuine SOITOW in seeing SUCh a Ireatmeilt IOr 194U-41 Miss West has just received her Mas- room. They were awaiting the arrival 

worthwhile and valuable organization pass from the limelight ..^ nmBf '^ dld they do t0 JjJ^J 1 ^ SuStaUnii^rStT 1 *•*■ *«S?b«wid fuertl^ppwr. 

Of Choral fame into history. our employee entrance?" Horace Kauffman was married re ed ' and almost immediatel y Blanche 

But let us explore the cause that we may gain a better un- "Why they took away the shirt fac- employed by the !! cited ■fLS?* 1 Marga " t - ^, ise ' 

' „f _ ^, ,. 1U '.J • „ torv front, and put a doorway there." „ u> ■* oa . -T e,n ^ u > eu . uy me Dons, and Dottie sang; Betty and ELsie 

dei'Standmg Oi the effect. The article lists the reasons given ,. WeU all rig i; t _ new lin J eum in Pennsylvania Power and Light Com- . swungsomefootballsongs;andMelissa 

by those in authority for the action. Investigation on our part the office-we're right in the groove, Franks of thewedded during "he and Ekie imitated ^ood old Milo and 
has served to convince us that this is a generally accurate state- eh Blanche?" summer when she became the bride of **• „ . „ . -WAlMW 

ment Of the case. in "™.; -^« *** ■- a l-P William Ayers of the same class. J«JJ-~-^ -J-gg 

The problem of gaining bookings for a choir of this type , Never can see Q]A J^^^; S£?£T& 'V^ t ,, hwh 

is becoming increasingly difficult through the appearance in read in g room's the same." ^i^T^^ZZZ eaSluS Sfa^raTof £F™ 

the field of large numbers of similar organizations not in exis- -Do you see what i see?" at ciarkson college. wnile the gir i s sang goodnirtit to the 

tence during the early years Of the Motet's existence. Whereas "Yes, and I don't like it— removing Dr. Thomas Dornblaser, '68, the TJni- tune of the traditional S. A. I, whistle 

several years ago the choir could book several engagements each ° ur bench-why it was like a tradi- versity's oldest living alumnus i <ta fact, song. 

J b wi tion." one of the oldest college graduates in S 

day relatively close together and with sizeable guarantees, it .. you mean usmg u between classes the entire country) celebrated his University Band Prepares 

has been necessary on several occasions to accept one engage- —more will have to stand now— my ninety-ninth birthday during the sum- For i n itia| Appearance 

ment per day and even to return to the campus between en- shoe "'pair bin goes up!" mer. 

Easements. This, of course, is a justified argument against " l ^ uess the y did need tnat extra s ^e Susquehanna university Band 

° & , . . ,. . . ,, , space for music shelves. But didn't Mnim Chosen President of will niake its initial appearance on 

continuance ol the choir on the same basis as in previous years. thev palK , r this roomr Men*. StuAmt rouneil university Field on Parents' Day se P - 

We WOUld SUggeBt, however, that if sufficient interest is .. Sure they did, and they made the siuaeni i, u tember 28. Much is expected of the 

Shown, the Choir should be allowed to continue as a strictly Instrumental room look like— a room." _ band this year for though a number 

... _ ... ,- . . „ ', "Sav most all the studies have been The first meeting of the Mens Stu- of seniors have left it will be l-einforced 

campus organization. We Offer this idea because we know that ri . deco ;. ated ,_ whal - s hal)|)f , ntH , hen , dent Council was held recently, at by new members. A number of Presh- 

Student interest in the Choir is very great and because we be- o,-. Sheldon?— It mrelv looks great." which time the members elected the men girls will be included ill the band's 

lieve that abandonment ol an organization dedicated to the The ladle. 1 Auxiliary under the «up- J*"** officers. President, Glenn 40 members. 

. -it inn nf hptter 'innreciation for the finer music is an act ^'vision of Mrs. Sheldon agreed to fix Museer; vice-president, p imp ^rg- Drill practice will be hold on Tues- 
Cication Ol DiUil appieciauon IOl me linei music is an act conservators B bit " rtraMtr; secretary-treasurer, SaiUord day and Thursday at 4: 10 P. M. and re- 
whieh should be taken only When and if there is no alternative, '„ W| , ( . ( . 1 . tainlv put " (1U1 . ltamp of ap . Btouth. tarsals on Monday at 7:30. Rush re- 
Why abandon the Motet U it can be kept in existence on a sat- proval on it:' ' The student council discussed thru- beanala and drills are being held to 
Isfnrtnrv haaiu'? Wp hciirvc this tn h( nnssihlp "Yes, they fave her one hundred dol- fall program with respect to the Fresh- got the band ready for its appearance 

lsiactorj oasis, wc dciicvc mis to uc poraiou , ^ uui ^^ only twpnty six cen|s men St>V(llal mH , vv , {im pi . ojects arP 011 Parents - Day . 

By allowing the Motet tO continue as a campus Ol'ganiza- i,.n'' l» view and they are expected to be of The band is directed by Prof. Elrose 

tion we Can Oreserve the interest and tradition Which nOW BUT- "O00d f« Mrs, Sheldon I" interest to the entire student body. Allison, a member of the Conservatory 

, .. , - A . . . .a S especially the upper classmen. faculty. 

rounds it and at the same time prepare for the day when it may iv11;hsorokirty council gives The Men's Student council's chief s 

be practical to resume annual tours. ANNUAL TEA kok ni-:\v ontU duty during the year is to act as an B&Um&ll and Gait Given 

S interpreting body for tradition; this p ... ^ . „ _. ~ 

PTlVfiRATTTl \TIO\S' rnrmal social life at Susquehanna is especially important during the "OSltlOllS 111 U, m)$ Si 

" ' ' ' got under wav When the annual Inter- freshmen orientation period. 

In pursuing our policj ol "giving credit where credit is due" Kjrority Tee was held la Selbert BaU s At the am business meeting of the 

we find it Impossible to refrain from extending a hand of con- peurton, Tueeday, September n for all rttii beer and maky cox hold current year Ruth Bpeeht, proeldenl oi 

,. t!,i H « 4* tu* nio^,- ^f >AA .v.. n,, (u-i ,,l n ,,i„i f ,ofr>« ? o„ fi'eshnian girls and transfer students. VESl'EK BONG SERVICE Omega Delta Sigma Sorority, appoint- 

gratulation to the class of 44 for the first successful getaway . 1|ir oionty girls di(1 thc s(>rvilH , e(i tv ,„ 11(>u . offlcers t0 flll tbm left 

in the last half decade. Not since the departed ('lass Of '40 while Bherrte Williams and Jeanne The Vesper service this Sunday vacant by Lila Barnes and June Sny- 

were freshmen has the campus heard of an uninterrupted fresh- Fenner pouwei evening wai led w Mary cox and Ruth cier, who failed to return to school. 

.. , ... . , . , f nln _ f . __ ]„„_. „„_ Arrangement! tor the event were in Beer, and was conducted as a song lima Bauman, junior, was made fin- 

men election ana an umnitiulcu pie.siaeni-eieci, SO long a^O rh . dm , ol Mal ian Crompton, preal- service. Janet Schockey was the or- aneial secretary, and Miriam Gait, 
was this that the Men's Student Council, supreme authority of dent of totereorority council. ganist. lophcmere, was made vice-president. 






WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<&- 



-<S>- 



CRUSADERS TAKE TO GRID AGAINST 
UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO SATURDAY 



-<3>- 



*« 



RANDOM SPORTS" 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



ball. The outlook for the Crusaders 
was cloudy but after the first few plays 
it was evident that the local boys had 
ample charge. Due to the wet weather 
our aerial attack was slightly ham- 
pered. 

The starting line up, and probable 
line up for Saturday is as follows: 

left end, Greco 

left tackle. Fletcher 

left guard, John Matthews 

center, Templin 

right guard, Campana 

right tackle, Dick Matthews 

right end, Heaton 

quarterback, Zuback 

left halfback, Isaacs 

right halfback, Helm 

fullback, Wos 



The 1940 edition of Susquehanna center but is being pushed by Blough 

University's football machine will take who is improving daily. The backfield, 

Ton VATPrnn T^pftprtYlPn tn Form FJiilwafk f to the turf on University Field for the however, presents a different problem. 

iii.ii AJCllClllieii 111 riirill DUIWdrK OI ; first sched uled game of the season this Several promising freshmen have made 

Starting Eleven; StaggTOen Anticipate Victory Saturday, against the gridsters of Buf- their appearance but the present con- 

Tri "Initial Fnrniinfpr > fal ° Universitv - Football season has census of opinion concerning them is 

III iniU ttl Ul ltuuiuci j been officially under way for two weeks, that the jump from scholastic to col- 

With the opening of the practice f Yll«nrW« Qh7wPrnmi«P ?£ all f dy . se yf a [ minor upsets have ■ legiate ranking Is a little too great for 
season September 2 the Susquehanna ^ lUkdlierb OnOWr rOHlISe taken place in the few collegiate games any of the frosh to break into the start- 
University's pigskin ' toters, under the In B. S. T. C. Scrimmaffe played ?° r m ° r f than three weeks the ing Hneup - ^ a result the bulwark of 

H f P h =!t have hpenn ° aVP rpnrpsent rmr alma iffpnso will h« narHoH u,r V,^* n , ra ™ 

systematic workouts in preparation for 
the opening game, this Saturday, with 
the University of Buffalo eleven. 

Handicapped by lack of material, al- 
though there are ten lettermen back 
for the season, Coach Stagg has staged 
more than a few sensational grinds to 
■warp the boys into a high degree of 
playing efficiency. 

From the pre-season dope that can 
be collected, the probable line-up will 
start Phil Templin at center, Campana 
at left guard, J. Matthews at right, 
Fletcher at right tackle, and D. Mat- 
thews at left. Holding down the end 
positions will be Heaton at right and 
Greco at left. Zuback will start at 
right half, Isaacs at left, McFall at 
quarterback and Zeravica in the full- 
back position. 

Practice injuries have been kept to 
a minimum with Campana, Bass and 
Rodgers on the sidelines due to mild 
afflictions, but in all probabilities these 
will be cleared up by game time. 

Hard-working substitutes will in- 
clude Blough for center, Hall and Con- 
rad for the guard position, Martin and 
Cochrane for tackles, Bass and Rich- 
ards on end, Helm, Lyons and Rodg- 
ers for halfbacks, and Wos for full- 
back. 

Other candidates who have just re- 
cently appeared on the practice field 
and appear to be developing along the 
lines of their respective positions are 
Nale, Manerval, Dye, Peyton and Ber- 
lin. 

Coming back to their campus from a 
Canadian encampment of three weeks, 
the boys from the Lake Erie City will 
be strong competition since they have 
probably not forgotten about our de- 
cisive victory on their grounds last 
year 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



men who are to represent our alma the offense will be carried by holdovers 
Mid the mous^ping ^^TU^TcSTi^J^ Ztt iFmSSttJS 

v^a" rs™ LOS KV£ I **««*> ™«™ «* ^ ft *T m «» STS? ** fT 

gressive Crusaders completely outclass- ! Last y ear the Crusaders had a rea- Zeravica will again take care of the 

ed the Bloomsburg State' Teachers sonabl y successful season; winning four »J" plunging and kicking John Zubac . 

College on our home field vesterdav af- ' games and losin e the same number. * m be first choice at the blocking back 

t. ■ <■■ J™, What will be our record at the end nf post. Bob McFall is gradually proving 

ternoon in a practice scrimmage. They vv " ai ' *«** "* Ul " 1CI ' UIU Al uie ena 0I r. ,. . . " ,, , J . H . f 

started out bv nlaving ten minute in- ' the Present season? Almost every stu- himself to be a capable blocking back 

. i ni u c <. • *v, < dent on the camDUS from frosh to thr- and wm also he -P to fill the departed 

tervals, Bloomsburg first carrying the c l Lue «-<""P"a A1 ""i llUM1 w tne ; , n „ r v.. „ T H 

present seniors, have been constantlv Baylors shoes, while Ken Lyons and 

inquiring of one another the answer Ed R °g ers will tak e the wingback spot, 
to the aforementioned question. It is The squad totals only 26 men and at 
hard to predict with any degree of ac- most of the practice sessions less than 
curacy what type of a record will be two full teams have been present due 
forthcoming because there are many to the fact that injuries have already 
variables which must be taken into , taken several boys out of the rough 
consideration. Will the team have cap- work. Richards and Greco have leg in- 
able leadership, will injuries plague ; juries and Ed Rogers has also been on | 
the team, will the opposition be strong- the injured list. Steve Zeravica suffered 
er than formerly, will the student body a leg injury last week and has been 
support the team, win or lose???? All a ble to participate in only the light 
these things must be taken into con- drills. However, Coach Stagg believes 
sideration before and after each game that all the Crussders will be in shape j 
throughout the season. | physicaUy for the opener. 

The personnel of the team is small ' To the student body we take this ' 

this year from the point of numbers initial opportunity to ask for a whole- 

but rather strong from the point of ex- hearted support from you as indivi- : 

perience. The line should be strong be- I duals and as groups on the campus. 

This lineup was constantly changing I cause it is studded with veterans from 1 Come out Friday night to the pep meet- j 

with the following players who will see \ one end to the other. Greco, Heaton, | ing and parade, come out Saturday af- j 

plenty of action this season: Richards, ! and Richards give us three capable j ternoon and cheer, cheer, cheer your 1 

Bass, Martin, Corcoran, Conrad, jends; the first two being letter winners j Crusaders to victory! | 

Blough, Zeravica, Lyons, and "Action" j last year. Fletcher, Dick Matthews, I 

Rogers. The following freshmen show Martin, and Corcoran will stand the 
promise of being a great asset to the bulk of the attack from the tackle slots 
squad: Berlin, Stuempfle, Sunday, j while Campana, John Matthews, and 
Nale, Peyton, Weinberg, Dye, Maneval. Hall give us a better than average set 

S | °f guards. 

Templin will again be the starting 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBl'RY 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Phi Mu Delta Downs I , 

i i Hockey Practice Begins; 

Beta Kappa In Touch Play Day to be at s. u. 



SNAVELY'S 



COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CL1RLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



Monday, September 23, witnessed the 

Most observers will agree that this open i ng f the inter-fraternity touch 
year's team, other than making a good f oot ball schedule. Phi Mu Delta out- 
appearance, will be superior in most c i assec ; Beta Kappa with a team aver- 
of the games that have been scheduled. iaging over six feet . The Mu Alpna ££*t£ni ta their rateutto'to letm 

The traditional "Parents Day will cnapte r acquired thirty points the first tne e of hockev 
undoubtedly swell the afternoon crowd, half and eighteen the second half while 



Where's the forward line? Play your 
own position! These and many other 
orders can be heard coming from the 
hockey field and the girls seem to be 
running keen competition to the foot- 



as an added feature. The University 
Band will strut its stuff between halves 
as well as during the playing time of 
the game to add spirit to the occasion. 
With one more home game scheduled 
October 5, with the American Univer- 
sity of Washington, D. C, there will 
be four games played away, then two 
more on the home field to complete 



Beta Kappa failed to score. 

Phi Mu Delta had Jones, Stiber, and 
Warner on the line and Smith, Milford, 
and Shusta in the Backfield 
played as a substitute. 

Beta Kappa's line consisted of Wil- 
cox, Moyer, and Fisher with Bashore, 
Booth, and Shadel in the backfield. 



Miss Shure has announced that the 
annual Hockey Play Day will be held 
at Susquehanna this year and for this 
reason the girls are very anxious to do 



the gridiron season. Following is the Hoover substituted 



schedule: 

Sept. 28, U. of Buffalo, home. 
Oct. 5, American University, home. 
Oct. 12, Swarthmore, away. 
Oct. 19, Juniata, away. 
Oct. 26, C. C. N. Y., away. 
Nov. 2, Allegheny, away. 
Nov. 16, Hartwick, home. 



Walsh | tneir best varsity practice has been 
i set for Monday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday at 4:30 and the attendance 
has been high for the first practices. 
There are quite a few freshmen, with 
an ability for hockey, who have report - 
This was the first of 12 games to be I ed for practice and it seems that the 



See 



MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

Come to Life at 

LIEB'S 

"For Things That Are Different' 
SUNBURY, PENNA. 



On the Fence 

Small Son (to father): 



"You never 



know where you are with women, do 



played. The schedule is as follows: 
Sept. 23, Phi Mu Delta vs. Beta Kappa 
Sept. 25, Bond and Key vs. Frosh 
Sept. 30, Beta Kappa vs. Bond and Key 
Oct. 2, Phi Mu Delta vs. Frosh 
Oct. 7, Phi Mu Delta vs. Frosh 
Oct. 9, Beta Kappa vs. Frosh 
Oct. 14, Beta Kappa vs. Phi Mu Delta 
Oct. 16, Frosh vs. Bond and Key 
Oct. 21, Bond and Key vs. Beta Pappa 
Oct. 23, Frosh vs. Phi Mu Delta 



upper classmen will have to work hard 
to keep their positions. The squad 
with the probable starters will be an- 
nounced later. 

S 

Fraternities Initiate 
At Annual Fall Formal 



On Sunday evening the Mu Alpha 
chapter of Phi Mu Delta held its an- 



you, dad? Mummy says I'm too big to Oct. 28, Bond and Key vs. Phi Mu nual Fall forma] initiation. The thir- 



cry and then she says I'm too small I Delta 

to sit up late. " I Oct. 30, Frosh vs. Beta Kappa. 



The Susquehanna Invites 
Its Readers to 

Patronize 

Susquehanna 

Advertisers 



What Benefits Them 



Also Is a Benefit to You 



teen newcomers into the fraternity 
were George MacQuesten. J. Milford, 
J. Galski, W. Curry, G. Smith, B. Heat- 
on. J. Walsh. D. Stiber. C. Gundrum. 
P. Templin, H. Dye, J. Helm, F. Cor- 
coran. 

The active members who took pan 
in the ceremony were A. Kaufmann. F. 
Warner, J. Jones, A. Knapp, D. Mac- 
Cartney, J. McCord, G. Brosious, R. 
Konkto. 

Alpha Psi of Beta Kappa opened its 
vcar of activities on Wednesday even- 
ing with the formal initiation of six 
of its pledget. Those who were given 
the tinai and the highest degree <>f the 
order are: Knighta Donald R. Bashniv. 
Hairy l. Wilcox, Kenneth Khnger, 
William b. Etothenberg, Jay Aucker, 

and Robert C. Stalil. 

s 

Little Miss Dictator 

A social worker met a little girl one 

morning, who appeared to be very un- 
happy. 

"What seems to be troubling you, 
'" she inquired. 

The child burst out. "I don't cart 
l\ isn't lair. It isn't fair!" 

"What isn't fair, dear? Tell me 
about it." 

"Well, it isn't fair! My dad be I 
my mother, an' my mother bosses my 

brother, an 1 my brother bosses my sis- 
ter, an' my sister bosses me, an' I don't 
have anybody to boss— an' it isn't 
fair!" 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 



SELINSGROVE 

• • « 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

(ieor^e Raft 
Ann Sheridan 



in 



a 



"They Drive by 
Night" 

FRIDAY 

Claire Trevor 
John Wayne 

in 

Dark Command 1 



SATURDAY 

SHIRLEY TEMPLE 
Jack Oakie 



in 



a 



"Young People" 



MONDAY 

George Sanders 
Wendy Barrie 

in 

The Saint Takes 
Over" 

rnsnw 

Judy Can ova 
Alan Mowbray 

"Scatterbrain" 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 

The ^xcdi Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St. 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 

RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 

Tries to Rive the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students, Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



Watson town Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 



AND 



PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa, PaxtonyiHe, Pa 



PAGE FOI'K 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 



1940 



Matrimony Climaxes 
Facultv Vacations 



Professor Russell Hat/ Marries Nancy 
Bowman; Other Members of Faculty 
Work and Play During Summer 



ocean. 
Miss DuPrain was In "two very m- 
ting classes" at the University oi 
. i 01 S] tal I 
lation was taught by Paul Doi 
New Dealei who had much to do with 



Dr. Russ Speaks About 
"Government, Business" 



Krumbholz Speaks About 
"S. C. A. as Influence" 



GALT PRESIDES AT FIRST 
MEETING OF PROCTORS 



Tuesday evening. September 17. the 
Business Society held its first meeting 

the year. The president. Florence day evening under the leadership of 



The first meeting of the Student 
Christian Association was held in the 
social rooms of Seibert this last Thurs- 



working on a mathematical problem 
concerning h-o-m-o-g-e-r,-e-o-u-s 
c-o-n-t-i-n-u-1. To quote Dr. Smith, 



Miss Irene Shure vacationed in Sun- 
bury and at the shore, in New York 
City. She very firmly did NOT go to 
he World's Fair. 

Mr. Osterbind visited his parents at 
Blacksburg, Virginia. He went to the 
Summer School of Virginia Polytech- 



Of all the Susquehanna faculty vaca- 
tion-, he mosl enjoyable and profitable 
Delongs to Prof. Hatz. He got married. 
Miss C. Nancy Bowman of Cleona. 
Peru . Music Supervisor of the 

Fawn Town-hip schools, York County. 
e Mrs. r four 

o'clock, . . . June 4th. The very 

newlywed honeymooned at Bynden 
Wood, Wernersville, for several days, 
. which they studied at Columbia 
Unn or their MA.' in music. 

Dr. O. Morri Smitl at of 

Lty, took no vaca- 
tion. While his family made their an- 
nual piigrinv • it relatives at Mt. 
Vernon. New York, the president stayed 
behind and worked. 

1 1 some record 'Aft< ■ 
Pyrai rid the 

; fin: lly saw Niagara Fall-." 
He : It one of the few thin 

B ' id adjective "stu- 

d certainly "well worth a 

' He look a trip Eng- 

irough - and 

refra Erom the World's Fair. He 

u, „„a, w ,„„.„i„ri only one play. "Life with Father. 
siduouslj cultivati /„_,_*_„* ,\L—^~ &,^™„ «™*v, 
the Gait garden. "You've got to be 
seme gardener to grow broccoli!" Yes 
sir! 

Mr. Yorty occupied his summer with 
doing over the college from different 
color- in the offices to new mail boxes. 
Also, Mrs. Yorty got a new kitchen, and 
Mr. Yorty traveled for S. U. 

Dr. Kretsehmann and his wife shot 
the St. Lawrence rapids. vLsited the * 
Thousand Islands, and went up the 
Saguenay river, visiting Taduosac, one 
of the oldest, towns in America 



the framing oi the Social Security act Reitz, opened the meeting which was Evclvn Williamson. 

immediately turned over to Dr. Russ, 
who spoke on the topic, "Gbvernnient 
ar.d Business" In giving the speech, 
Dr. Russ gave a short summary of the 
pamphlet. "Government and Economic 



and other N. D. measures. The other 
course, On Personnel, was taught by 
Air. Stone, an anti-New Dealer. Mis- 
DuPrain says she has the lowdown on 
higton. 



Dr. Reitz in between trips to relatives Life." This pamphlet dealt with the 

ai Weissport and Weatherly and his ubject of governmental economic ac- 

iter at Camp Nawakwa, spent the ivities and private enterprise. The 

pursuing a sort of glorified speech was very interesting and very 

of farming. ducational. 

Dr. Adam Smith was in Philadelp] 



Mary Lee Krumbholz spoke on the 
topic. "Making the S. C. A. a Greater 
Influence on the Campus." She, first, 
mentioned the various reasons why 
students come to college and the par- 
ticular importance of coming to Sus- 



quehanna where they are able to re 

ccive good religious and social develop- ; gress made and the variou 



• Continued from Page 1) 
Before taking action Dean Gait 
made a study of twenty Pennsylvania 
colleges to discover the best system of 
dormitory government. As a result he 
decided to institute the present sys- 
tem wherein upper-class students have 
a great deal of authority in handling 
problems; he appointed one student on 
each floor of Hassinger Hall and one 
student in Selinsgrove Flail to perform 
these duties. 
The dean then summarized the pro- 
problems 



FACULTY NEWCOMERS 
GET PERSONALITY QUIZ 



• Continued from Page 1) 

but really she has been giving more 

medical attention, that she had antici- 

l. Students are urged to come to 

see her as soon as they feel indisposed. 

"My work here is very interesting 

and the religious aspect which is es- 

ial i- good here. Since I've worked 

i:ic Institute and studied Scientific Ger- with young people, I find this very en- 



ment as well as intellectual. The heart 
of Mary Lee's talk was the fact that 
we "should present our bodies, a living 
sacrifice, holy and acceptable unto God, 
which is our reasonable service." There 
are many ways in which we can help 
the S. C. A.; but the most important 



faced by the committee last year. He 
then announced with great emphasis 
thai conditions were not yet totally 
satisfactory and that the committee 
should bend every effort to make furth- 
er improvement this year. 
The committee decided that Dean 



way of all is the example which we Gait should call together the residents 

give of our conduct and our own per- of Hassinger and Selinsgrove Halls on* 

sonal lives. Thursday evening after dinner for the 

Cornelia Grothe accompanied the purpose of explaining the system as it 
singing. Elaine Miller announced that 



man. 

Miss Hoffman, following the prece- 

of other S. U. faculty members, 

he University of Chii 

in her case at the Graduate Library 

School. She worked so much she saw 



istant Librarian Audrey North at- 
tended the University of Michigan's 
Graduate School of Library Science, 
tailing on her M.A. in library science. 
The rest of the time she lived at home, 
East Aurora'. N. Y. 

Over at the Conservatory. Professor 
and Mrs. Sheldon were a week in New 
York, at the World's Fair and some 



we were to have a guest speaker at our 
tax! meeting; further details will be 
given later. 
These meetings which are held dur- 



: whether they are members of the S. C. 



joyable." 

There art many nice places to walk 

; ' k, d „,h n f fra«h Q i,- lng Hie week are open to all students 
lor exercise and a breath ol iresn an, 

Hein has thus discovered in her 
ramblings a good apple tree and eat- 
ing the apple, she abides by the old 
adage of "An Apple a day keeps the 
doctor away." 



will be administered this year. 

Further meetings of the committee 
will be held in the dormitory from 
time to time. 



Professor Stevens was guest eonduc- 



tention to the masculine gender, first 
of all this necessitated a change of 
surroundings and a new line of ap- 
proach. 
Mr. Walter Kelly is the blonde 
tor of the Ohio State Chorus, and gentleman who speaks so fluently to 
taught the Choral Clinic class at the his English classes. He finds Susque- 

M U" Xv "V'tT 1V Mr^ „ loi r University. Professor Stevens conducted hanna a pleasant and friendly place 
Dr. and Mrs. LiMui visitea men and d te d ts a favorable time here. 

medical speciaUst «w nrt Yoilk. j m ^ ^ jj^ is similar t0 Ursinus 

he " ; l,l&ia 1 ™S Ringwald, ;- Istant conductor of the since both are small campuses and 

C ty where they aw tte clowkmri Svmpli0m , conducting the have religious backgrounds. "My hob- 

/'• ; ' f ' t • r i? coll ! ympnony orchestra. Then the bies are music and the theatre." 

thl h l ' traveled south to New and Prof. Heath was most cordial and 

gior Ocean Grove f a week. cov _ interested in questioning the 

10.000 miles. interviewer about the campus. Prof. 

Potteiger spent a week in Heath, EU it happens comes from 
v,.,. vra-i- Q-ri n M-ooi- in Phiir, n'ninhin nearby college, Buckncll. and until his 

home here is ready, he commutes from 

concerts and all the Lewisburg. "I anticipate an enjoyable 

in both metropoli. . rience here when we get Mi 

Uaa Prudence Fish studied with Ma- He expressed that he was delighted 

. Olga Averino at the Middlebury with the kind and friendly attitude. 

Colleg< .Music Center, in Vermont. She "There is a feeling of belonging which 

went to the Boston Symphony con- la a Part of Susquehanna whether 



Sweet Passage 

William Dean Howells was rather 

1 timid about writing love passages in 

Her hobbies are collecting poetry, his stories, but he was once engaged 

especially like the tone of Wordsworth upon one, running in serial form, which 

and Bryant " called for such an ending. One day he 

And now it is time to devote our at- ' left this final installment at the mag- 
azine office, the love passages being 
approved by the editor. 

The foreman placed the manuscript 
in a box which he used for filing such 
material; but the next day he was 
astonished to discover that most of 
the manuscript had been scattered and 
largely devoured. 

On being told of the incident, and 
asked to re-write the story, Howells 
remarked it must have been so sweet 
that the rats seized upon it. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa, 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



An officeholder is a politician who 
has traded the bunk for a berth! 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



• .unkelberger spent a week at the few York, and a week in Philadelphia. 

Nati ■- : "" 1 : ili :.: u ., i the „^' n ^ c !^ 

e, Then he to 
nd historl 
or 1 cturi PI G 
For about two v, was 

at th 

Men: eh MUl, Boyi rtown. Tl ■■• of 
the time he worked en hi- history of certs, conducted by Serge Koussevitsky 
gny( ,,,,! ■ 1(;v ,,u my do-." at Hawthorne's estate. Tanglewood. Af- 

Mlss Lois Boe visited friends and the terwards, till school, she was at her 
plays and movies of New York, having home in Vermont, 
fun. Then she dropped in on old friends Professor Allison studied Organiza- 
arid professors across the country at tion and Administration, and the Im- 
the University oi Wisconsin. By the provement of Teaching in College at 
time she arrived home in Sioux Falls, the Julliard School of Music, New York. 
South Dakota, she was ready for a visit : He studied piano under Guy Naier, 
to the Black Hills and Gutzum Borg- and also studied voice. Mrs. Allison 
lum'f perpetual epic reliefs of the heads soloed in flute under Fritz Mahler at 
of Washington, Jefferson, etc. Only a number of Julliard concerts, 
drawback to the heads, "I had to get 
up at the unearthly hour of 4 a. m." 

Dr. Russ till July 1st traveled down 
south with his wife as far as Key West. 
then to New Orleans and home— 7000 
miles. After scanning the World's Fair, 

they visited Mrs. Russ's relatives at (Continued from Page 1) 

Boyno City, Michigan. By August 2 student body was convened for the 
they were back heme, and Dr. R. was opening convocation of the school year. 
working OB his book. President Smith presided and intro- 

Coach Stagg met his lather in Chi- duced Dr. Paul E. Witmeyer, principal 
d visaed the Big Ten, the Pa- f the Shamokin schools, as the con- 
ciflc Coast Track and Field Meet at vocation speaker. 

n, Illinois, and the National Dr wiimever spoke on the orien- 
Track and Field meet, for .. lt;on Qi tne ; . tudent t0 W orid condi- 



George B. Rine FLORIST stored 



is tradition or not. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining" Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 







RANDOM SPORTS ao.Pa -a.k ... . 

S 

EIGHTY-THIRD SESSION OPENS 
WITH INCREASED STUDENT 
ENROLLMENT 



PENN STATE 
PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 
1939 Lanthorn 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 



SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



. ther n fereed. Then he saw 
. • range In Northern 
Ini his parents at Hol- 
land. Michigan, he wenl to Columbia 
and one-half m eks 
of ■ ,n - 



tions. He stated that the greatest na- 
tional problem of today Is thai of un- 
employment and that social science has 
advanced little in sou years as com- 
pared to other sciences. 'What does 
the 83rd convocation mean to you? 



Di. YV:. '< an unl I - why .,..,, tri ere colleges? To learn to 

up with think; to learn to control natural laws; 
tamu y to learn leadership . . . pul awaj child- 



Compllments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



nil :. Anne h 

only healthy oi 

I and hi - 
R 

. ta the, en! (there 

reception in Alumni 

Oyn | ; ident Smith. 

illsa Hein, 
Dr. ': Heath, and Ph I 

ived 

Ripley 



ish things; you are in colli 

There followed biief remarks by 
President Smith centering on the 
theme ol God ■' • while In 

college. Dr. Smith also extended an 
inviti tioi • the 

chun the community to at 

I V. ei k, 

Cli 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



I 

Prof. G. 






THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

A fully accredited theological In- 
stitution. Now in Itl 114 year. 



For 



Information addn 

JOHN ABERLY, 



President 



. . H caught 



Donkey Engine? 
Awaj from hi vill - 

iast potato and ch 
■.. , pl( te with donkey 

it. 
For a l( ■•: momen! - hi ' tared at it 
tonishment. Then: "Begorra," he 



' "P : aid. "Oi'M i inkeyi in 

much m e nam have Oi 

Che; » seen one that had at to push 

d traveled to Port Mi - it." 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 



Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 

courses: — 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

: RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B., B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 






Susquehanna Univ. Library 






In This Week's 
Susquehanna 



News 

Dr. Stover Here 
Dr. Ross Stover addresses students 



during visit to campus. 



Page 1 



Dr. Foelsch Leaves 
Dr. Charles B. Foelsch, friend of the 
University and former pastor of Zion 
Lutheran Church in Sunbuiy, be- 
gins work at Washington pastorate. 

F»agel 

Lanthorn Work Begins 
Nancy Griesemer, '42, announces 
plans for taking Lanthorn photos. 

Page 4 

Blough Speaks to Staff 
H. Vernon Blough tells editorial staff 
about sports writing. Page 1 

Gait Announces Dean's List 
Dean Gait reads names of special 
honor list in Chapel. Page 1 

Statistics Released 

Office of Secretary of Admissions re- 
veals interesting facts about student 

body. Page 4 

Books Added to Library 
"Book of the Month" numbers se- 
cured among new additions. Page 1 

Sports 

Susquehanna Defeats Buffalo 
Staggmen swamp first rivals 20-6, 

Page 3 

Touch Games Played 
Freshmen and Bond and Key are 
winners in respective games. Page 3 

Basketball Begins 
Good season predicted; many fresh- 
men answer call. Page 3 

Features 

Practice Teaching 
Writer expounds on hard school of 
experience. Page 1 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXXXVII. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2. 1940 



Number K 



DR. ROSS STOVER APPEARS ON CAMPUS Dean Gait Announces Students Entertain 
IN THREE-DAY SERIES OF ADDRESSES Latest Dean's List Parents on Saturday 



"Life Consisteth Not in Fortune, Fame, or 
Pleasure; But Rather in What You Know, What 
You Love, and Do," Pastor Tells Students 

Librarian Announces 
ImportantNewBooks 



At chapel, Monday morning. Sep- 
; tember 30, Dean Gall officially an- 
! nounced the Dean's List for the second 

semester of the 1939-1940 college term. 

Those students who attained this high 
| honor consisted of the upper ten per 
j cent of the student body, and it so 

happened that they averaged a "B" or 
■ better. Following is the list as read 
! by Dr. Gait: 

Marion Boyer. Mary Cox. Katherine 

Dietterle, Jeanne Fenner. Samuel 

University Library to Get "Book of Fletcher. Melvin Haas. Warren Herrold. 
the Month" Numbers; Beard, Benson ' Faith Harbeson. Elsie Hochella. Glenn 
Durant Among Authors ; Musser. Marjorie Musser. Joseph Pas- 

I terchik. Martha Sechrist, Martha 

Tribby. Harry Wilcox. Michael F. 

What's new at the library? The most Wolfe. Marjorie Wolfe, Jean Penman, 

clergymen in the East. He is pastor of : obvious answer of course, is books, [ and June Snyder 

the Messiah Lutheran Church of Phila- I more than a hundred and fifty of them ! s 

delphia. He is widely known for his I so far this year. To the delight of Ofa. fYkiirco / »„,,„ , WJfk 
sincere enthusiasm in his preaching | many students will be the news that ! ^ ldr ^ uurh " VjpeilS W llll 
which attracts many to his church to j the "Book of the Month" books will be Noted String" Quartet 
receive spiritual help each Sunday. j added regularly for the first time this , ' _____ 

The speaker's theme was "Matching j year. Miss Hoffman has very kindly) The 1940-1941 season for the Sus- 
the Master's Stride," given us a thumb-nail sketch of a few j quehanna University Star Course opens 

We as Christian young people must of the books which she feels the stu- on Monday evening. October 14. in 
endeavor to live as nearly like Christ ' dents will read both for enjoyment ! Seibert Hall with the presentation of 
as we possibly can. The world today and instruction. tne famous Roth String Quartet 

is calling for people who possess a Beard. Charles A. and Beard Mary; Qn Tnursdav evmi November 14 . 
deep and sincere interest In their own R- America in Midpassage": A history 
spiritual life and also in the spiritual tnat is really readable. A sequel to 
life of other people. As Christ extend- I "Rise of American Civilization." giving 
ed his passion for people beyond the i a social and intellectual history of the 
mere scope of His immediate locality, ] United States from the time of Cool- 



"A Christian is not one who is per- 
fect, but rather one who is trying to 
match the Master's stride." 

These challenging words opened the 
inspiring message of Dr. Ross Stover 
as he spoke to the students at the S. 
C. A. meeting in Seibert social rooms 
on Monday evening. Dr. Stover ad- 
dressed the entire student body in 
chapel on Tuesday and Wednesday 
mornings. 

Dr. Stover is among the outstanding 



Many New Students to 

Work on 'Susquehanna' 

i 

Last Wednesday, many freshmen and i 
transfers applied for membership to ! 
the editorial and business staffs of I 
THE SUSQUEHANNA. Harry Thatch- 
er explained the duties of the editorial 
staff, and Elizabeth Reese explained 
the work of the business staff. 

Those who applied for the editorial 
■tall are Jim Clark, Maryruthe Sell, j 
Dorothy Wanser, Herbert Holderman, 
JIM Shotts, Cliff Graha m, Janice ; 
Crawford, Catherine Fisher, Audrey 
Haggarty, Robert Kiefer, and Florence 
Houtz. Marjorie Wolfe, sophomore, is I 
also new to the staff this year. 

Those who applied for the business 
staff are Jean Buffington, Ralph Brown, 
Richard Magalea, Helen Romberger, 
Charles Ague, Helen Hocker, Lois 
Krammer, Martha Jane Jacobs, Gerry 
Jones. 



so must we have a universal vision of 
our fellow men. The love for people 
is the main thought here. 

"Do you wish to know how to be 
successful in life?" the speaker asked. 
'Just love people." 

Dr. Stover stimulated further thought 
by stating that there are too many 
"Moderate Christians" in the world 
today. These are the Christians who 
are unwilling to stand firmly on their 



idge up to two years ago. 

Van Doren, Carl, "Benjamin Frank- 
lin": A book which was on the best 
sellers list for months, a "Book of the 
Month," and one of the most popular 
biographies in the last several years. 
Comprehensive, detailed, with a 
charming literary style. 

Benson, O., "Through the Diplomatic 
Looking-glass, Immediate Origins of 
the War in Europe": The diplomatic 



conviction and all of the principles | activity of Europe before the outbreak 
which their Christian faith represents. I of the war is untangled which is based 
When Jesus lived on the earth, it was j on the available documents beginning 
necessary for Him to display a cer- with the settlement of Munich up to 
tain degree of righteous indignation. | its final test in the German demands 
When He entered the temple and found J upon Poland. 

the money changers therein He be- Johnson, Hugh S., "The Blue Eagle 
came angry and drove them out. I from Egg to Earth": Do you know the 
Christians, in a like manner, should j author? He has quite a background, 
assume an indignant attitude when He was administrator for the NRA 
observing the many evils of modern j from its beginning until October 1934 
life. This is a part of our obligation j and probably knows more about the i 
as we try to place our feet firmly upon NRA than any other person. A great 



Dr. Foelsch Leaves 
Sunbury Pastorate 



Famous Minister and Man of letters 
Assumes Duties at Washing" ton; 
University Extends Best Wishes 



the teachings of the Master. 

Dr. Stover concluded his address by 
adding the element of joy which should 
be prevalent in the heart of every true 
Christian. 

"The Christian is an optimist." He 
does not necessarily believe that every- 
thing is all right, but he does believe 
that everything will be all right. His 
faith is so centered on the higher 
things of life that he has the assur- 
ance of a final peace and happiness 
resulting from his leading of a sin- 
cere Christian life. 

Speaking in chapel Tuesday morn- 
ing Dr. Stover delivered a very im- 
he used the general couplet: "Life con- 
sisteth not in fortune, fame, or plea- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



deal of the book is autobiographical, 
the remainder devoted to an account 
of his dealings in the NRA. 

Public Affairs Pamphlets: About once 
a month the library receives a publica- 
tion of the Public Affairs Committee. 
Each publication discusses some social 
or economic problem of this country. 
Some of the pamphlets are "How 
Money Works," "The Fight on Cancer," 
"How Good are Colleges?" "What 
Makes Crime?" "Why Women Work," 
and many others. 

Wright, J. E 



we have the opportunity of hearing 
Rockwell Kent, the famed artist, auth- 
or, adventurer, and explorer, lecture on 
the subject, "Art is for Everyone." 

Jay Allen, war correspondent of the 
"Chicago Tribune" and Louis Fischer, 
former Berlin correspondent of "New 
York Post" will give a very interesting 
symposium about "The Shape of 
Tilings." This opportunity to hear di- 
rectly about foreign affairs will be pre- 
sented on January 29. 1941. 

February 10 brings to us Eugenia 
Buxton, an American pianist who has 
played abroad in London, Paris. Brus- 
sels and other foreign cities. 

The Siberian Singers under the di- 
rection of Nicholas Vasilieff will make 
their second appearance on the cam- 
pus on Tuesday evening, March 25. 

The last feature on the Star Course 
for the 1940-1941 season will be April 
2, at which time S. Stephenson Smith, 
author and educator, will lecture to us 
on "The Fine Arts of a Democracy." 
S 

Dramatics Club Elects 
Officers for New Year 



The first meeting of the Dramatics 
Club was held on Monday evening, 
September 23. The meeting was well 
attended by students who belonged to 
the club in former years, and also by 
many of the members of the freshman 
class. 

Clyde Sechler, Philip Bergstresser, 
and Blanche Forney were chosen as 



! members of the executive committee, 
and Corbett, D. S., j Lois Davis was elected secretary and 



"Pioneer Life in Western Pennsyl- 
vania": Describes the way of life when 
western Pennsylvania was a frontier. 
Discusses the log church, justice, trans- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



Pierce Coryell was placed in charge of 
publicity for the club. Mr. Walter Kel- 
ly, the new instructor in the English 
department, is to be faculty advisor 
for the club this year. 



Susquehanna's good friend, Dr. I 
Charles B. Foelsch, is leaving his pas- 
torate at Sunbury, where he has serv- 1 



ed for "six precious years" as the 
popular preacher of Zion Lutheran 
Church. Dr. Foelsch has accepted the 
call to the Luther Place Memorial 
Church in Washington, D. C„ largest 
Lutheran Church in the world, and is 
leaving this week to take up his work 
at this new charge. 

During his stay in Sunbuiy Dr. 
Foelsch won wide acclaim as pastor 
and speaker which was evidenced in 
the large numbers of students who 
flocked to hear his services. Through- 
out the past several years he conducted 
'he public speaking course here at the 
University; last year he Introduced the 
use of recordings of the student's 
voice, before and after study, wliich 
has proved to be valuable in speech 
development. 

Dr. Foelsch received his A.B. de- 
cree at Wartburg College in 1909, and 
his Ph.D. at the University of Pitts- 
burgh in 1924. In addition to his po- 
sition as lecturer on Susquehanna's 
faculty, Dr. Foelsch had similar asso- 
ciations with Gettysburg College. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA extends the 
best wishes of the students, faculty, 
and administration to Dr. Charles B. 
Foelsch with sincere gratitude for his 
many kindnesses to Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. 



Writer Discusses the Pro's and Con's of Practice 
Teacher's Pseudo-Didactic Pastime 



Last Saturday the annua! Parents' 
Day was observed by the college — the 
administration joining the student-; in 
entertaining their parents. The day 
was formally opened at eleven o'clock 
with a chapel service in charge of 
Elaine Miller and Harry Thatcher. 
Music was furnished by Lois Yost, 
Faith Harbeson. and the Crusader 
Quartet. President Smith spoke to tire 
assembled students and parents on the 
recently passed selective service act. 
He explained that it would affect only 
those who are twenty-one or over and 
under thirty-six years of age: and 
further that if one selected who is at 
1 college, he may ask his local board to 
defer his period of training until after 
July, 1941. Registration may be made 
in the college town and possibly on the 
college campus. Dr. Smith spoke in 
' conclusion of the attitude of the Chris- 
tian and of the Christian university to- 
ward the so-called peace lime con- 
scription. 

There were 327 students and parents 
served luncheon in Horton dining hall. 
A new departure was made from the 
usual procedure for Parents' Day in 
the omission of after dinner speakers. 
At two o'clock the parents were en- 
tertained at the spectacle of seeing 
S. U. win the first football game of 
| the season from the University of Buf- 
falo. 

Following the game, tea was served 
j in the parlors of Seibert Hall by mem- 
j bers of the Women's Student Council. 
I Mrs. Russell Gait and Miss Jane 
I Hutchison poured. 

S 

Blough Speaks to Staff 
About Sports Writing 

A series of talks for the reporters of 
'The SusuehannT staff cot uider way 
[last Friday wi+n i talk on sports vnt- 
jiny by Vernon dliugh ThU was the 
first of a series ot talks which will ha 
| given by ladies end gentlemen in the 
| newspaper work _0 various phas.es of 
: the business 

Mr. Blougn first strewed style and 
structure as the most important feat- 
| ures of written articles. Under style, the 
author must have clearness, concise- 
ness, and originality. In structure, thf 
j: speaker point :0 out that brief para- 
| graphs, good seiuo.v.v structure, and 
emphatic begirminffi were essential. 
The lead should contain the answers 
to who, what, where, why, when and 
hew. 

In the sports angle, he described the 
shorthand used by the writers to rover 
the various events. He brought out the 
fact that statistics aix playing a more 
important part in the sports writeup 
because the fan ran see just ho v every- 
thing happened. Emphasizing that the 
truth should liwaya be given the pub- 
lic in a story, he closed with the ad- 
monition against over-cmpha.sized pre- 
season buildups of either teams or in- 
dividuals. 

Next week the speaker will be Mr. 
Marion S. Sehoch, -ditor and publisher 
of "The Selinsgrove Times" and print- 
er of "The Susquehanna." His topic will 
be "Problems and Production of a Col- 
lege Newspaper." The meeting will be 
held at 3:30 p. m Friday 

O- — 



veys nothing to the sophomores, jun- 
iors, and seniors. To Drs. Dunkelberg- 
er, Reitz, Russ and Mrs. Giauque, it 
signifies there are a lot of would-be 
teachers on campus. 

The difficulty, as students at Selins- 
grove, Sunbury, and sometimes North- 
umberland high schools will readily 
agree, lies in the fact that would-be 
teachers must practice. 

The situation is arranged thus: the 
college professors get the permission of 
the principal of, say, Selinsgrove high 
school, and then make arrangements 
with the individual teachers. The 
PT's, as they've been christened, are 
then assigned to a certain teacher in 
the high school. Music students must 
spend 210 hours, commercial students 
190, and academic students 180 hours 
to their teacher. Part of the time they 
observe the techniques of that teacher, 
and the other part of the time they — 
mention it gently — teach. 
PT's Side 

Looking at it from the PT's view- 
point, and you might as well because 
they're fellow college students, all high 
schoolers are hellions to be ruled with 
ciously and adequately executed. 



There's no question that the "kids" 
are not angels. Local high school 
graduates Lois Beamenderfer, Florence 
Reitz, Douglas Portzline, and Philip 
Bergstresser will gladly (sympathetic- 
ally?) tell their senior classmates who 
are PT's the status quo. 

What is the worst problem the prac- 
tice teachers face? An old hand at the 
teaching profession (She once busted 
a paddle most appropriately) says the 
worst problem is the "kids" themselves, 
i. e. discipline. Another problem, per- 
haps more germane to the practice 
teacher, is embodied in the question, 
"Will I know enough to teach them? 
Will I be able to answer the ques- 
tions?" One PT says he keeps three 
chapters ahead of the classroom as- 
signments, but there's one dirty little 
so-and-so who's five chapters ahead. 
For publication- 
Karl Young: "Selinsgrove high school 
is swell." 

Liz Reese: "Sunbury high school is 
sweller." 

Of all the professions, none is so 
fully represented at Susquehanna as 
pedagogy. To freshmen that probably 
means nothing. Very possibly it con- 



Clyde Sechler: "My first and third 
graders are two swell li'l ol' classes.' 
The Guinea Pigs' Side 

All right, so we're getting along fine 
in class, doing okay. So the teacher 
says tomorrow some dumb college stu- 
dent is going to teach us. and if we 
don't behave we'll get our pants fan- 
ned. All right, so it's a challenge. 

So the dumb guy comes to school, 
and it ain't a dumb guy. it's ■ dumb 
girl. All right! So she's real tough 
the first day. Thinks she's gonna keep 
discipline. All right. 

So, maybe a couple days later we 
start acting up. So she can't do noth- 
ing about it. So we give her the works. 
All right. So she gets tough, and tin- 
regular teacher sits in ihe back of the 
room. All right, so we're good. 

So she gets her nerve, and teaches 
alone, so we give her the works. Think- 
ing we can learn so much at a tune as 
college students! So she'll be a teacher 
some day. All right, so we Initiated 
her. 

Outside of being a teacher, she's 
j okay. Pretty teeth, pretty eyes, pretty 
\ dimples, pretty cute. Wisli 1 were 
| older. 
I an iron hand in an iron glove judi- 



Marching Band Puts 
In First Appearance 



Those who attended last Saturday's 
football game were well pleated With 
the Showing made by the band. The 

colorful uniformi and the intricate 
drills performed by meznben of the 

band were in keeping With the spirit 

of the game The band is boasting this 
year oi two drum majors June Hen- 

drlclCS and Dorothy Patllick. 

The band is continuing to rehearse 

it enlarging repertoire and intends to 

use many new marches both popular 
and i The band consists ot 

forty members: 
Hendricks and Paulick, drum ma- 
Webber and Hit t tier, color guards; 
ickcs. Attinetr Oottschall, Mayer, 
Payne, Mltman, Knlseley, Ri 

Brand, Stowers. Keieliley, Mease, Wolf- 
gang, fryer, Secrtati, Bpooner, Wilt. 
Oarntr, Fritz, Boone, Pasterchick. 
Wert, James, Lamont, Stahl i 

Turnback. Delhcker, Kastep, Aueker. 
Bonsall, Fisher, Uothenberg, Hock. 

Price, l .each 






PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA MAY WE . . 

. . SUGGEST 



Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
Intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 



Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service. Inc., 
College Publishers Representative. 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters- G Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner. 41; Merle 
Hoover '41; Jane Hutchinson. '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella FetherofI, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox. 43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjorie Wolfe, '43. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

.. Fred Warner 

Advertising Managers Ob&bn shustfl 

| Frank Corcoran 
Assistants j Dorothy Webber 

Faculty Advisors; Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Busines s, Prof. D. I. Re itz. 
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1940 



WHEN DO YOU CHEER? 

The grid encounter with the University of Buffalo Satur- 
day revealed that Susquehanna is "on the way up" in football. 
Our team, while evidencing a certain lack of finesse usually 
found in the first game, showed that they will be a real prob- 
lem for their remaining opponents. To the team and the coaches 
we offer our hearty and sincere congratulations. 

We should like to recognize, also, the good work done by 
the cheerleaders in attempting to gain support for the team 
from the student spectators. 

To the students present at the game, however, we can toss 
no such flowery compliment. To them we can only say: "Why 
didn't you cheer?" 

During the first part of the game, especially, there was a 
noticeable lack of response to the cheerleaders' efforts. Only 
when it became apparent that the team would win did the stands 
lose their lackadaisicalness; this "be on the winning side" atti- 
tude is the type of support that one would expect of the general 
public— it is not a characteristic of the loyal support that should 
be shown to a team by their own college student body. It is 
the duty, and should be the desire, of every loyal Susquehannan 
to show his appreciation for the efforts of the team at all times. 
In the games to come our team will strike stiff er opposition. 
What attitude will the students take? To cheer a winner is 
easy and instinctive, but to stand loyally with a loser is an evi- 
dence of the true sport. Let's adopt the slogan that the team 
is using: "The team that won't be beat can't be beat:" 

S 

HERE COMES THE BAND: 
The fine display of football witnessed on University Field 
last Saturday was touched off by one of the best performances 
of drills and martial music that the University band has given. 
We wish to praise each member of the band and its director for 
a piece of work well done. In the short space of two weeks this 
group has replenished its ranks with freshmen and has suc- 
ceeded in moulding old and new members alike into a well pol- 
ished whole. The precision in music and in act was equal to 
that usually found only in bands of much more experience. 

This excellence was not overlooked by the spectators at the 
game, cither; for the first time in several years the student 
stands broke out in applause on three different occasions as the 
Orange and Maroon ranks executed their maneuvers. 

Let this performance be a stimulus to spur the band on to 
greater excellence; let the student body continue to support 
their band by showing appreciation for a truly outstanding 
Susquehanna organization. 

S 

MORE CHAPEL TALKS 

So far this year we have had a fairly good student attitude 
toward the daily chapel services; but if this year is typical, the 
interest will become a greater problem as time goes on. Con- 
scious of this danger, we should all be trying to discover a 
means of preserving the interest and sense of participation in 
the services. Without this spirit flu- services will become dry, 
valueless empty form. 

Wo would suggest, as indeed it has been suggested before, 
that the chapel worship service be supplemented more often 
by short talks from members of the faculty in their respective 
fields. These talks would be of Interest to the students and, at 
the same time, would be Of great value. It would seem to us 
that talks on currnt events in history, politics, and economics; 
and requirements lor various positions and graduate schools 
would be very appropriate. 

Another suggestion for the chapel period would be the ex- 
pansion for the annual vocational guidance series to include 
men especially fitted to speak on the qualifications required for 
various fields. We recommend this even though it might be 
necessary to go beyond the limits of the alumni group to do so. 



WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
I Love You Again 

When a respectable small town busi- 
ness man goes on a cruise and returns 
as a smooth talking confidence man, 
anything can happen. William Powell 
is the amnesia victim and he just 
about has the home town in his vest 
pocket when he discovers that he is 
married. Myrna Loy is the bewildered 
wife and the presence of her boy 
friend. Donald Douglas, doesn't help 
the cause of domestic tranquility, even 
one little bit. This is one of the best 
examples of the current trend toward 
fast moving comedy with snappy dia- 
logue. 



FRIDAY 

Mystery Sea Raider 

(Or the "Boy Allies on the North 
Sea"). This is probably the first of a 
cycle of melodramatic war pictures in 
which the nasty Nazis are all properly 
chastised before the final clinch. 



SATURDAY 
Carolina Moon 

A Gene Autry "horse opera" with a 
southern exposure. 



of the book, which kept it on the best 
seller list for several months over the 
summer. The book is a very readable 
presentation of the production, trans- 
portation, refining and distribution of 

a basic and vital commodity of our 
civilization, blended with enough his- 
tory to make this book an intensely 
human and readable document on a 
world problem, in all its complex and 
variable ramifications. 



WEDNESDAY , OCTOBER 2, 1940 

To the Editor 



Dear Eidtor: 

Orchids to "The Susquehanna"! 
Your new column "May We Suggest" 
not only makes good reading, but is 
most helpful in planning my "movie 
budget." Also, I welcome a column 
which depicts pictures in their true 
light. Your reviews of last week were 
very good in spite of the fact that I 
like SHIRLEY TEMPLE! 

A "Temple" Fan. 



"JOE AESOP SP EAKS" 



MONDAY 

Wagons Westward 

This is a western. It doesn't make 
any pretense of being a musical com- 
edy, an historical epic, or a social docu- 
ment and this is probably why it is 
good entertainment. Chester Morris 
plays the good old mistaken identity 
part of the twin brothers, one a mur- 
dering stage coach robber and the oth- 
er a law-enforcing government agent 
with Buck Jones as a crooked .sheriff. 



TUESDAY 

The Girl from Avenue A 

We're sorry but Jane Withers isn't 
at her best in this picture. It concerns 
a famous author, Kent Taylor, who 
befriends a tough little vaudeville 
hoofer and unknowingly hurts her feel- 
ings. When she takes it on the "lam." 
everybody has a good cry but somehow 
things turn out for the best. 



Once upon a Time there was a 
Freshman named Hoibert. 

Hoibert was Fresh from Home and 
was suffering from Mal-de-Mere— if I 
may coin a Phrase. 

Hassinger was still a House of Hor- 
ror to him and Small wonder— what 
with upper-classmen cluttering up the 
Place. 

Hoibert was all Mixed up. 

•Why do They have so many Little 
Doors to the Book Room?" he wailed 
in his Freshman Bewilderment. 

A sophomore withered him with a 
Scornful Glance. 

Poor Hoibert really took a Beating. 

• Aw, chee. fellahs! Don't tweat me 
so wuff. I got asthma. Honest!" 

-Dunt treating him so rough, boys." 
This from the Sophomores as they 
tossed Hoibert 's shoes Heavenward. 

Hoibert lived in Mortal Terror of the 
Sophomores. 

But I'll get wevenge," his whimper- 
ed later as he Polished A Sophomore's 
Pince-Nez. 



Well, he made a valiant effort. 

He got up at six o'clock of a Thurs- 
day morning. He tip-toed downstairs 
and went outside. He stumbled around 
sleepily and headed Due East. He 
walked and walked. 

Dimly he saw some White Pillars as 
he reached Gustavus Adolphus— he 
thought. 

"Let's see. the day-room," quoth 
Hoibert. 

He circled the Building and saw No 
One. 

He sat down on some Steps. Soon 
a truck stopped near him and a man 
got out. 

The Man placed a quart of milk be- 
side Hoibert and drove away again. 

Hoibert blinked. 

He looked at the Pillars. Above them 
he saw some Letters. He spelled: 

"P-O-S-T-O-F-F-I-C-E! " 

Two minutes Later it had Sunk In. 

"Baw," Hoibert cried, "I am wost!" 

Moral for Frosh: Wook before you 
Weap! 






"ODDS 'N ENDS" 



Meditation ford's "The Shoemaker's Holiday," or 

This columnist, welcomes himself Paul Whiteman's "There's No Place 

back to the paper with a hearty hand- Like Your Arms." Here's a little lis- 

shake. because if he doesn't, who will? tening for you: Duke and Tennessee, 

First of all, an apology to my one 3:15 on Saturday over CBS. Glenn 

reader: Raymond Scott's band is not Miller, ten o'clock any Tuesday, p. m. 

the number one band of the country, if you please. ... Or Jan Savitt 12:30 

and, according to all present indica- a. m. any Wednesday???? 

tions. hasn't the slightest chance of ... 
ever attaining aforesaid goal. Oh well, 

we all miss once in a while, and some Stuff— 

of us more than others. . . . Things we With so many gals in school, even I 

can do without: Some of our mighty shouldn't be a lemon in the garden of 

sophomores moaning about the so- love, or should I? The new drum ma- 



KEYHOLE SLANTS 

. . ON KEY BOOKS mo,="= ts*; -*j^.- ~ ~ * = 



called beating?? they took LAST year. 
Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin. 



jorette had herself a time with a feet- 
ball player on Saturday, or is it a 



at banquets 



Pin Ball Machines. • . ■ Everyone else makes predictions, 



Of necessity a college library is made 
primarily of "meaty" books, whose 
consumption and digestion implies real 
fortitude among the readers, but 
among these testy intellectuals are 
frequently fascinating items which will 
be reviewed from time to time for the 
delection of the avid—. The library- 
last year bought considerable new fic- 
tion with the interest from the gift 
"Class of '39 Fiction Fund." These 
titles will be listed and discussed in a 
later article, as will the books received 
recently on our "Book of the Month 
Club" membership. Our library re- 
ceives many highly interesting and ex- 
citing books, bearing on vital student 
problems— books giving insight into 
specific vocations Oike the one re- 
viewed today), into world events, as 
Hitler's "Mein Kampf" and the Pub- 
lic Affairs Pamphlets dealing with such 
subjects as: "How Good are Our Col- 
lcucs?", "Security or the Dole?", "Doc- 
tors. Dollars and Disease." "Jobs after 
Forth," "How Money Works." 

Such a "timely" book is the one re- 
viewed today. It is "This Fascinating 
Oil Business," by Max Ball. It is 
really the story of the Standard Oil 
Company's operations in both hem- 
ispheres but it includes much more, 
with technical discussions of the drill- 
ing of oil-wells, the locations of the 
world's natural oil beds (the biggest 
catch behind the question of who wins 
the war), and the transportation of oil 
through tht long snake-like tubes that 
cross whole mountain ranges to con- 
duct tlie raw oil from well to refinery. 
Don't many of you remember the pan- 
oramic photographs in "Life" last win- 
ter of this romantic oil industry and 
its engineering feats of conquering 
mountains in Columbia in South 
America? Another angle of the oil 
business as a career can be gained from 
a bed seller on the fiction list of a 
couple years ago: "Oil for the Lamps 
of China," by Hobart, which our lib- 
rary also has. 

Thus our book for today, "This Fas- 
cinating Oil Business," uives the tech- 
nical side of one of the world's great- 
est industries, now in its prime and 
still looking toward new worlds to con- 
quer Who says there is no romance 
in Industry? Tliis will picture for you 
one of the most exciting and ambitious 
ra reers a young man could hope for! 
Proof of this is the public's appraisal 



, ' A D „,. „„„, „,„,, whv shouldn't I? I think McKechnie 

' Llt i% \\T, Pnr San "* I wil1 P ick Cincinnati for the 

Tracy and Secret Agent PDG .Joan « Satu ^ 

isan. . . . Gene Autry as «___^«* 

■m f *i,. D o u,,™™ and Tennessee over Duke, Penn State over 
Flat tires. Human ana * ,. 

Bucknell, and who wouldn't? Cornell 

over Colgate, and Northwestern over 

Syracuse. That's enuf. Oh yes, I'll 

pick Albino State Teachers College 

over Stegie Prep. With Spike McBull- 



Crawford as Susan. . . . Gene Autry as 
a singer 

otherwise. . . , War Sabotage, Espion 
age, Camouflage, and Yehudi, the mir 
age. . . . 

Bandwagon 



niciwagon coaching, how can dear old Albino 

To mv mind, the summer saw two b ' 
bands go skyward: Tommy Dorsey and lose? Did anyone notice the size of 
Charlie Barnet. T. Dorsev put out the the victory parade on Saturday? One 
finest recordings of the year with his band and one Model T Ford. ... The 
Til Never Smile Again," "The One I sixth graders call their new teacher 
Love" "And So Do I," and "We "Blondie." One just can't help the 
Three." Charlie Barnet gave us color of one's hair, can one, Ken? The 
"Echoes of Harlem," "Scotch and photographer asked Joe Salt if he 
Soda," "Leaping at the Lincoln," Six wanted to look like Wallace Beery. 
Lessons From the Old Lady, "Dark Wow!!!! The story has been noised 
Avenue," and, last but not least, "La- around that the Seniors want a Sen- 
ment for May." Too much could not ior Ball. That's all very nice, but 
be said about "Lament for May." It's whom would they ask? I'll cover up 
one of those sweet, hot jobs that makes that last feline felicitation with a lot 
you bounce and yet you dream. Wax- of ejaculations, gesticulations, and hal- 
ing poetic, my pets, and at my age! lucinations. 
For an oldie, how about Jimmie Lunce- OLIVE OYL. 

wilt speaks about^aYSrTm - * My Father's On My Side 



AT ESTES PARK, COLORADO 



The vesper service Sunday evening 
was led by Paul Knisely and Kenneth 
Wilt in the form of a candle-light ser- 
vice. Dorothy Holmes sang the im- 
pressive solo "The Lord's Prayer." 

Kenneth Wilt, the only representa- 
tive from Susquehanna this year to at- 
tend the Ashram of Lutheran Students 
at Esles Park, Colorado, talked on the 
subject "Thy Kingdom Come" which 
should be the faith of our day for 
American youth. The benediction was 
pronounced by Dr. G. Morris Smith. 
S 



An officeholder is a politician who 
has traded the bunk for a berth! 



MV FATHERS ON MY SIDE ...b. — 

My Father says he doesn't care 

What I want to be. 

A poet, or musician, or 

Professor in astrology. 

He says whatever work I choose, 

He knows will suit me best. 

He knows what suits he and I 

Will also suit the rest. 

He knows my work upon this earth 

Will ne'er lower his pride 

Instead, he says, whate'er I do 

He'll be on my side. 

So now I can't disgrace him, 

I'll never let the world at rest, 

I'll let men do what they will, 

But 111 do my best. 

S 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



NOTICE TO THE ALUMNI 

Do you wish to subscribe to the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity newspaper for the coming year? If you do, please 
notify Maxine Heefner, Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove, Pa., within the next week. 

By taking this subscription you will get the first hand 
news of your Alma Mater and will help us in building a 
better and stronger "Susquehanna." 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-$>■ 



-«► 



CRUSADER ELEVEN CRASHES TO VICTORY Freshmen, Bond and Sage Comments on 
OVER BUFFALO UNIVERSITY 20 TO 6 Key Win Touch Frays Football Outlook 



Zeravica, Heaton Combination Tallies Twice; 
Isaacs Displays Running Ability; Trybuszewski 
Outstanding- Among Opponents 



Under a cloudless sky. the Susque- 
hanna University Orange and Maroon 
Crusaders opened another grid season 
by cracking the University of Buffalo 
Bisons for three touchdowns while 
holding the visitors to only one tally. 

In the first quarter, fumbles and pass 
interceptions held the Bisons from 
making any scoring threats. Collins 
kicked off for the visitors. Templin 
grabbed the ball, fumbled, and a re- 
covery was made by H. Smith for the 
visitors. The Bisons advanced the ball 
to the 18-yard line but were forced to 
kick, after which the Crusaders again 
fumbled with Nuwer recovering on the 
Susquehanna 26-yard line. Another 
fumble was in order when Nuwer drop- 
ped the ball to be recovered by the 
home team and another scoring threat 
was stopped dead in its tracks. Larry 
Isaacs, small sophomore back, grabbed 
the pigskin for a 35-yard jaunt around 
left end and Zeravica hit the line for 
four more yards. Zuback picked up 
two and a play later Zeravica tossed a 
17-yard pass to Heaton on the 20-yard 
line, who tore across the stripes for 
the first marker of the game. Heaton 
converted the extra point from place- 
ment. The Crusaders again got into 
trouble after the kick-off when Isaacs 
fumbled Nuwer's punt, which was re- 
covered by Grossi on the Crusaders' 30 
yard line. Templin's pass interception 
killed any Buffalo advance to end the 
first period. 

Still handing out the breaks, in the 
second quarter, Joe Wos, a freshman 
fullback, made two fumbles in his own 
territory when it appeared that the 
home team had the ball rolling. Thru 
the line, Bonnerb and Bowers made 
their way to the Crusaders' 24-yard 
line, where the visitors drew a penalty 
of five yards for off-sides H°re the 
home team took over after Bonerb 
tossed out an incomplete pass. Isaacs 
opened with a beautiful run to his own 
46 yard line where Helm fumbled only 
to be nullified when Dick Matthews 
recovered a Buffalo fumble two plays 
later. Held for their downs, the home 
team was forced to kick to the 25-yard 
line. Nuwer and Trybuszewski cracked 
the line to the 40 where Nuwer passed 
to Small on the 49-yard stripe as the 
whistle sounded for the half. 

So far the Crusaders pushed 125 
yards into enemy territory by rushing 
and made a total of 38 yards by passes. 

After the kickoff, by Zeravica in the 
third period, the line held to the ex- 
tent of forcing the visitors to kick. 
Showing their stubbornness to defeat, 
tht Bisons made Zeravica punt only to 
be fumbled by Small and recovered by 
J. Matthews on the Bison's 26-yarcl 
line. Again the Zeravica-Heaton com- 
bination went into play, scoring the 
second touchdown and widening the 
gap to 14-0. Zuback kicked off and 
in four no-gain attempts the visitors 
again punted, only to receive the pig- 
skin on downs, after the home team 
could make only meager advances. 
Again the breaks came our way when 
Isaacs intercepted a pass. Wos crash- 
ed thru the line for a 3-yard gain and 
Heaton punted to the visitor's 29-yard 
Hue. Grossi scampered around right 
end to make a gain of 12 yards as the 
quarter ended. 

In the opening of the fourth period, 
Trybuszewski was forced back 10 yards 
when Heaton surprised him by break- 
ing thru the line, and to get out of 
this dangerous position the visitors 
punted to their own 45-yard line, 
where it was picked up by Lyons and 
ndvanced 10 yards. Wos slammed the 
line for two nine-yard gains, Helm 
Kiabbed five yards thru the same hole, 
Wos opened again to bring the ball to 
the 6 yard line and on an end run he 
touched the scoreboard for another 
marker. 20-0. 

Heaton missed on the placement af- 
ter which Zuback kicked-off to the 
visitors. Templin intercepted a visitor's 
Pass and returned the ball to the 30 
yard line and the ball was lost utter no 
wins were made. This started a 70- 
yard line-bucking advance with Try- 
buszewski and Nuwer taking turns 
carrying the ball. Trybuszewski tore 
over the line after a lirst--in-ten was 
gained on the 1 yard line. Collins fail- 
ed to add the extra point by kicking 
too low. Buffalo then kicked-off to 
Bass who advanced from the 50 to 
their 34 yard line as the game ended. 



I The lineup: 

Susquehanna Buffalo 

i Greco L. E Grossi 

| R. Matthews ... L. T R. Smith 

Campana L. G Snyder 

Templin c Perkins 

J. Matthews ... R. G Collins 

. Fletcher R. T Garlapow 

Heaton R. E Shields 

Zuback Q. B Biedenkopt 

Isaacs L. H. ... Trybuszewski 

Helm R. H Nuwer 

Zeravica F. B J. Smith 

Substitutes: 

Susquehanna— Peyton, Lyons, Con- 
rad, Bass. McFall. Hall, Richards, Wos, 
Corcoran, Blough, Martin. 

Buffalo— Bowers. L. Smith, Small, 
Bonerb, Hoffman. Forgraves. Cook, 
Kish. H. Smith. 

Score by periods: 

S. U 7 7 6—20 

Buffalo 6—6 

Officials: referee, Francella i Villa- 
nova); umpire. Killinger (U. of P.); 
linesman, McMillen (Gettysburg). 
Statistics 

S.U. Buffalo 

First downs by passing 1 

First downs by rushing .... 7 7 

Yards gained by rushing ...231 164 

Yards lost 18 15 

Forward passes attempted . . 6 7 

Forward passes completed . . 2 1 

Incomplete forward passes . . 3 3 

Intercepted forward passes.. 3 

Number of punts 6 9 

Yardage of punts 193 314 

Average runback for punts . . 83 3 

Kick-off yardage 157 36 

Average run-back from 

kick-offs 15 45 

Fumbles 7 4 

Balls lost 7 3 

Yards lost by penalty 20 30 

S 

Girls Elect Captains 
For Hockey Competition 

The different classes in girls' hockey 
have been busy during the last few 
weeks practicing for the class hockey 
games which will start in about two 
weeks. Each class except the fresh- 
men, have elected their captains and 
they are: seniors, Jane Hutchison; 
juniors. Maude Miller, and sophomores, 
Mary Cox. The class teams this year 
seem to be well matched and the com- 
petition will probably be very keen. 

Miss Shure has not yet announced 
the names of the girls on the varsity 
hockey team. She has been trying the 
candidates in different positions dur- 
ing practice and they have been work- 
ing to correct errors in their playing. 
All are looking forward to a successful 



On Wednesday. September 25, the 
freshmen hard fighting, fast running 
team marched over Bond and Key. 
The first year men now say they are 
ready to give Phi Mu Delta a thrash- 
ing. 

Dave Lohmann captained the fresh- 
man team to its victory. The mem- 
bers of the freshman squad consisting 
of two teams that were used alternate- 
ly are: Earny Boden, Ralph Brown, 
Bill Jansan, Roy Hockstuhl, Glenn 
Schuller, Roy Eskels. Dick Moglia, Jim 
Clark. Charles Ague, Dave Lohmann 
! (capt.) 

Red Mitman, Bond and Key's cap- 
tain and signal caller was unable to 
be there. However, he hopes to make 
up for lost time in the next game. The 
fraternity players were George Bant- 
ley, George Herman, Alan Parcels, 
John Wolfe, Jerry Startzell. Melvin 
Jones, Stanley Baxter, and Clyde Sech- 
ler. 

Monday evening, September 30, 1940 
1 Bond and Key, under the brilliant 
' leadership of "Red" Mitman, their cap- 
! tain, outclassed Beta Kappa's touch 
; football team by the score of 12-0. 
I "Red" was the local frat's signal call- 
er and star of the team. He scored one 
of the touchdowns and threw the pass 
to Al Parcells thus making the total 
of 12 points. 

However, never let it be said that 
Beta Kappa wasn't out there fighting 
with vim, vigor, and vitality. Their 
team consisted of the following: Merle 
Hoover, George Moyer, Harry Wilcox, 
Don Bashore. "Silas" Schadel. and Ken 
Klinger. 

Bond and Key's team was made up 

of the following players: "Red" Mit- 

. man, Clyde Sechler, George Bantley, 

, George Herman. Alan Parcells, and ! 

Harold Startzell. Stan Baxter acted 

as sub. 

The next game to be played in the I 
touch football schedule is the Phi Mu 
Delta-Freshman game. If you will | 
remember, this is the game in which I 
the Freshmen prophesy their great vie- I 
tory. This game is to be played Wed- 
nesday, October 2. 



With the Buffalo trouncing a thing 
of the past, Coach Stagg and his boys 
will spend most of the week ironing 
out some of the rough spots displayed 
in last Saturday's tilt and in getting 
into shape for this week's game against 
American University. Fumbling was 
one of the more noticeable defects to 
be worked on. 

This will be the first time the Cru- 
saders have engaged the boys from 
Washington, D. C. in a gridiron tussle, 
and it may prove to be quite a battle. 
Considered a weak team in the past 
American underwent a change in 
coaches a couple of years ago, acquir- 
ing Staff Castle, a former Shamokir. 
boy, who has whipped up a team more 
fit to give opposition. They run most 
of their plays from punt formation or 
single wing back and are reputed to 
have a better-than-average aerial at- 
tack, something to be on the alert for. 

As a whole, the team emerged from 
the Buffalo scrap in good shape, the 
one exception being Steve Zeravica who 
because of a renewed foot injury may 
not see action in the forthcoming 
game. Joe Was, freshman sensation, 
did no damage to a "charley horse" he 
has been suffering from and should go 
"great guns." 

Coach Stagg is planning to use more 
new men this week-end than he did 
last. "Monk" Meyers has returned to 
school and will no doubt see action 
while Ken Lyons and Eddie Rogers. 
backs, and George Bass and Ray Con- 
rad, linemen, are expectant substi- 
tutes. 

All in all the outlook is favorable 
so let's give the team our support in 
its attempt for a successful season. 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



Pep Rally Paves Way 
To First S.U. Victory 



Hockey Play Day. 



Basketball Team Gains 
Recruits in Freshmen 



The 1940 Susquehanna quintet, de- ; 
spite the loss of three varsity men of) 
last year, shows promise of becoming a j 
strong aggregate by the addition of 14 I 
freshmen. These varsity aspirants are ! 
Phillip A d o n i z i o, Marlin Bollinger, 
Ralph Brown, James Clark, Raymond I 
Eskels, Stuart Flickinger, David Gross, 
Ray Hochstuhl, William Janson. David 
Lohnnn, Richard Moglia, Phillip Plum- 
ner, Glenn Schueler, and Donald Sha- 
fer. Four of these. Flickinger, Gross, 
Lohman, and Rummer are high school 
lettennen. 

In the mainstay for this season's 
u(M)den-way schedule are the following 
regular! and J. V. men: Captain Don- 
ald Ford, Stan Stonesifer, Blair Heaton, 
Phil Templin, Eugene Smith, John 
Wolfe, John Hugus, Jack Mayer, Clar- 
ence Klein, and Chester Shusta. No de- 
finlte positions have been assigned as 
yet, but we feel that these boys will 
perform very well in their chosen spots. 

The basketball players are practicing 
l wice each week in the gym under the 
direction of Coach A. A. Stagg, Jr., in 
preparation for their opening tussle 
with the Pottsville branch of Penn 
State here in Selinsgrove on Tuesday, 
I >■ a mber 3. 



S 



Very Probable 

Policeman (to tramp sitting on top 
of oak tree): "Hey! what are you do- 
ing up there?" 

Tramp: "I don't know; I must have 
sat on an acorn." 



Were you there? Did you hear it? 
Wasn't it stupendous! Well, folks, 
that was only the cheering on Friday 
night to send our boys off for a victory. 
It was the first Pep Rally of the sea- 
son—what spirit! Not only the fresh- 
men "yelled" but even the sophomores, 
juniors, and .seniors!!! 

Our band was there kicking around 
a bit, led by none other than that 
"rhythm king"— Joe Pasterchik. Girls, 
wasn't he sumpin". And the cheerlead- 
ers—they, too, were in "tip top" shape. 
Our two new cheerleaders, freshmen at 
that, were initiated Friday night— they 
did a good job too. The young lady is 
Doris Trainer and the gentleman, 
Glenn Schueler. Both of them, as I 
understand, helped support their team 
in high school. More power to them; 
with them to lead us, we can't help 
j winning. 

Chuck Kline called on all the boys 
; individually to make a speech. Some 
j were expecting it and others will be 
blessing Chuck for the rest of his life. 
Nevertheless, they made a great show- 
ing and all seemed to be in "chipper" 
shape. 

Coach Stagg seemed quite confident 
as to the boys' ability; but he pointed 
out the fact that the winning of games 
depended upon the whole student body. 
Quoting some of his words, "If some 
of the co-eds are just dating the boys 
be cam e they are football stars, and 
keeping them out late at night, they 
are on the opponents' side— traitors to 
their own school." "The 'frat' boys 
should think of their brothers trying to 
sleep the night before a game and tip 
toe in the house, instead of bursting 
in, waking them up, and telling them 
what a nice date Susie was." "Also, 
the boys have been training hard— who 
for, OLD S. U." 

With the pep and spirit as great at 
the games, as it was Friday night, our 
boys just couldn't let us down. 

S 

Confused 

Husband: "Did you have some gas 
put in the car?" 

Wife: "No, dear, the indicator points 
to half, and I thought perhaps you 
would tell me whether it's half-full or 
half-empty." 



See 

MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

Come to Life at 

LIEB'S 

"For Things That Are Different" 
SUNBURY, PENNA. 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • a 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

William Powell 
Myrna Loy 

in 

"I Love You Again" 

FRIDAY 

Henry Wilcoxon 
Carole Lo^an 

"Mystery Sea 
Raider" 

SATURDAY 

(iene Autry 
Smiley Burnette 

in 

'Carolina Moon' 

MONDAY 

Chester Morris 
Anita Louise 

in 

'Wagons Westward' 

TUESDAY 

Jane Withers 
Kent Taylor 

in 

"Girl From 
Avenue A" 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROYE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The %*cdl Ston 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 
COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



B. K. VV. COACH LINE 

Tries to fiive the College Students 
the best service, espechllv the Sun- 
bury Students Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures everv person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



Watson town Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 



AND 



PAVING BLOCKS 

Office : 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories : 
Watsontown, Pa. Paxton vllle, Pm 



PAGE FOVR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1940 



Griesemer Plans for 
Lanthorn Pictures 



Among Our Alumni Interesting Facts On 

Student Body Revealed 



Almost every day brings reports of 
more marriages among the alumni. The 
. latest bridegrooms are Clarence Far- 

^fParftUonsaregrtngjteft^aheadljgy <36 _ an[1 Morgan Edwards. '37. 

Clarsnce Farley chose as his bride 



for the 1941 Lanthorn according to the 
reports from Nancy Griesemer, editor- 
in-chief. The latest news is the fact 
that individual and group pictures will 
be taken during the first two weeks in 
October by Mr. Brcon of Penn State 
Studios. 

The members of the editorial staff 
are: Jack Mayer, Red Mitman, Neil 
Fisher, Sherry Williams, Maude Miller, 
Ruth Schwenk, and Blanche Forney. 
The associate editors are Louise Mc- 
Williams and Betty Rene Smith. The 
freshman staff are: Robert Stowers, 
Herman Stuempflc, Helen Hocker. and 
Dorothy Paulick. 

The snapshot assistants for this year 
are Fred Warner and George Mac- 
Questen. 

Sanford Blough is the business man- 
ager; his assistants are: Forrest Adams, 
Jack Walsh. Bill Jensen, Mary Nelle 
Brand, John Leech, and Doris Trainer. 

The students are asked to give their 
cooperation by meeting their ap- 
pointments for pictures. 



President Smith Issues 
Statement to Directors 



Miss Lois Romig of Reedsville, the 
town in which he had been made a 
member of the high school faculty a- 
bout three years ago. He is a brother of 
Ruth Farley, one of last year's gradu- 
ates. 

Morgan Edwards, who is completing 
work nt Mt. Airy Theological Seminary 
this year, will be married to Wilma 
Saul, a Drexel student 

Rev. Woodrow Klinger, '37, brother of 
Martha, Herbert. Kenneth, and Corine 
Klinger, has just accepted a position at 
the Oriole Lutheran church near Jer- 
sey Shore. 

The music schools of West Virginia 
are well supplied with graduates of the 
Susquehanna Conservatory as super- 
visors. Andrew Kozak first entered this 
field in 1932 when he started to direct 
the Concord State Teachers College 
band. Kozak is now, however, complet- 



The office of the Secretary of Ad- 
missions has reported the following 
statistics of various student affiliations. 
The 322 members of the student body- 
represent nineteen religious groups: 

Baptist 7 

Catholic 24 

Christian Science 1 

Church of Christ 1 

Church of God 1 

Congregational 5 

Episcopal 3 

Evangelical 18 

Evangelical Congregational ... 1 

Evangelical and Reformed 2 

First Christian 1 

Jewish 2 

Lutheran 150 

Methodist 47 

Presbyterian 32 

Quaker 1 

Reformed 19 

Swedish Evangelical Mission . . 1 

United Brethren 3 

No Preference 3 



A daughter was born July 25 to Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Valiums, of Selins- 
grove. Mrs. Valunas is the former 
Katherine E. Stetler, '35, of Mifflintown. 
where she taught in the high school 
before her marriage. The father was a 
member of the class of '37 and was 
recently elected assistant coach and a 
member of the Selinsgrove high school 
taculty. 



A. A. was, who was in it, how a stu- 
dent could get in it, what it does, and 
what it stands for. The freshmen and 
I transfer girls seemed to appear en- 
1 thusiastic and eager to become mem- 
jbers of W. A. A., and the active mem- 
Ibers considered the party a success. 



Total 322 



ing work at Cornell University for his Our present freshman class 



President G. Morris Smith's annual 
report to the board of directors has 
just been released in which a complete 
survey of the past school year is re- 
corded. 

Of considerable interest is the por- 
tion devoted to the facts concerning 
various members of our faculty who 
have gained recognition in National 
and Educational Associations. 

Dean Gait reports the improvements 
which have been introduced in the I lX« a ±l, nn A T?«if y V|t<>n/I 
boys' dormitories and in the fraternity j {J edl » «"« ««« ^Sf a 
situation. Mention is made of the new j ^OVel AcCOUlltlllg" C 111110 

placement tests which are now in use I 

for the incoming freshmen and the Q n Friday. September 27, Dr. H. A. 
system of faculty advisers which orig- Heath and Professor Daniel Reitz of 
inated for the benefit of the students. . the Business Department, attended the 

Miss Barbara Kruger reported that | accounting clinic at Penn State. The 
there has been progress in the slow ] c i inic was sponsored by the Harrisburg 
work of building up an effective stu- i chapter of the Pennsylvania Institute 
dent government and that the situa- | f Certified Public Accountants, and 



doctorate degree and Bill Caruth, '35, 
has taken over the music at Concord 
State Teachers College. 

Others in West Virginia schools in- 
clude Lewis Howells. '37. John Ulp, '37, 
James Higgins. '38. Fred Schmidt. '40. 
Joe Mehalow, '40. Since Dr. Sheldon 
has just had a request for another mu- 
sic supervisor for the West Virginia 
area, it is possible that another mem- 
ber of last year's class may follow the 
others to West Virginia. 

Lee "Skip" Rishel. '34. of Selinsgrove, 
well-known star halfback on the unde- 
feated team of 1932. has been appoint- 
ed Superintendent of Fares for the new 
Pennsylvania Turnpike. 

S 



numbers 103 

Liberal Arts 44 

Commercial Education 18 

Music 25 

Business Administration — 16 

Sophomore 86 

Junior 64 

Senior 62 

Special 7 



W. A. A. Holds Informal 
Get-together for Girls 

On Tuesday evening at 7 p. m. the 
Women's Athletic Association enter- 
tained the freshmen and transfer girl 
students in the Seibert Hall social 
rooms. Each member of W. A. A. 
was assigned to bring one or two fresh- 
man girls. The purpose of the meet- 
ing was to enable the girls to become 
better acquainted and to give them a 
general idea of W. A. A. 

It was an informal get together and 
the evening was spent in dancing and 
getting better acquainted with each 
other. During the evening refresh- 
ments were served and the W. A. A. 
president, Marian Crompton, explained 
to the new students just what the W. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



Total 322 

S 

A baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Karl Kniseley on June 2 at the Alle- 
gheny Hospital. Pittsburgh. The young 
son's name is Karl Eugene, II. The 
father is a member of the class of '38 
and will complete his study of theo- 
logy at the Mt. Airy Theological Semi- 
nary. Philadelphia, this year. The 
mother is the former Charlotte Dunkle, 
x'41. of Johnstown. 

S 

A Sailor's Jest 

Sea Capcain: 'Waiter, what do you 
call this?'' 

Waiter: "Bouillon. Sir." 

Sea Captain: "Well, well, I must 
have sailed on bouillon all mv life and 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining" Service 



29 N. Market St. 



SelinsgTove, Pa. 




tion proves that "the public opinion of j was attended by members of this or- j didn't know it." 
one's contemporaries is always more 
effective in bringing about conformity 
than are the admonitions of an older 
person in authority" 

S 

Dr.KretschmannSpeaks 
To Phi Kappa Opener 

The Greek Club held its first meet- 
ing of the year last evening. President 
Mary Emma Yoder opened the meet- 
ing and immediately turned the floor joyed a banquet at 6:30 



ganization and accounting instructors 
from various schools in this section. 

During the afternoon session three 
speakers addressed the assembly. They 
were Mr. Roy Kester, Dr. Mitchell of 
the University of Pennsylvania, and 
Mr. Joseph Seitnan of New York. There 
were also discussions of the surplus 
profits tax. personal income tax. and 
various technical problems of account- 
ing. 

Those who attended the clinic en- 
Following the 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



banquet came the evening session 
which featured the addresses of Mr. 
Charles Burchard of Pittsburgh and 
Mr. Joseph A. Wilson of Philadelphia. 

S 

LIBRARIAN ANNOUNCES 
IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS 



over to Dr. Kretschmann. who gave a 
very interesting lecture on "The In- 
terpretation of the New Testament 
from Greek." 

The club, composed of ten mem- 
bers, is looking forward to a year of 
lectures as interesting and enjoyable 

Stevens to Give Lecture 

.,,... _„ , ,. __ . (Continued from Page 1) 

Willi Mules OI Mexico portation. town life, and the first fac- 

tories. 
The opening meeting of the Ladies Guthrie E R , .. The Psvc hology of 
Auxiliary will be held October 5th, at Human conflict": An easilv readable 
2:30 p. m. in the social room of Seibert book on the psv ,. hology of human be _ 
Hall. Mrs. T. W. Kretschmann will havior _ man - s adjustment to circum- 
preside. stances. 

Professor Frederick Stevens, who will' Cookson. N„ "The Costume Book": A 
be the guest speaker of the afternoon, good book on the history of British 
will talk about "A Trip to Old and New costume for those interested in play 
Mexico." Colored slides will also be productions. The illustrations are 
shown. simple and clear and the book contains 

a fund of information for the unpro- 
fessional worker 

Skeffington. "Elizabeth": A "Book of I 
the Month," and listed on "What 
America is Reading" for more than six 
months; a fiction story well worth 
reading. 
Durant. Will. "The Life of Greece": 
Book of the Month," "being 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



First National Bank of Sclins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 






Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., SelinsgTove, Pa. 



DB. ROSS STOVER APPEARS 
ON CAMPUS IN THRU- DAI 
SERIES OF ADDRESSES 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEAEER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 



Northumberland, Pa. 



i Continued from Page 1 
sure, but rather in what you know, 
what you love, and what you do." His 
use of songs to "put over" his point Another 



proved very effective. 

This morning Dr. Stover delivered 
another address to the students dur- 
ing the < impel period as a sequel to 
that nt the previous morning. 

Dr. Stover is a trustee of the Uni- 
versity and attended a nice: ing of the 
trustees while on the campus. 

Hi ■ •' graduate oi Wittenberg Col- 
and oi Hamma Divinity School 



a history of Greek civilization from be- 
ginnings, and of civilization in the 
Near East from the death of Alexan- 
der, to the Roman conquest." 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 
A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



-S- 



Inhnspitality 

From a radio news broadcast: "The 
Lot Angeles zoo has been forced to 
dl band because of a lack of funds, af- 
ter a valiant light to keep the wolf 
from the door." 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 



Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

T . RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL. PRE-LEGAL. PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pre*. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PROGRESS! 

INSURANCE IN FORCE 

$676,500.00 

192! 
$4,112,500.00 

$26,370,926.00 
$42,56S\441.00 

l!)n9 (to date) 

?68,1 63,095.00 



' 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



MINNEAPOLIS 



LEGAL RESERVE LIFE INSURANCE FOR LUTHERANS 
Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



YOUR INSURANCE 

does double duty for 
you ! Provides a 
monthly income for 
your dependents in 
the event of your 
death; or, if you live 
to retirement age, 
! iws you a monthly 
income for life. 












Susquehanna Univ. Library 









In This Week's 
Susquehanna 

News 

Peacetime conscription here 

College men of age to register next 
Wednesday before special board on 
local campus. Page 1 

What conscription means 

Dr. Russ reviews some implications 
of America's first experience with 
peacetime selective service. Page 1 

Speech Association meets 

Annual meeting of debate coaches 
and managers choose debate topic for 
current season. Page 1 

Star Course tickets ready 

Dr. Sheldon announces hours when 
tickets may be secured in Conserva- 
tory office. Page 1 
Sports 
Crusaders win second tilt 

Orange and Maroon wave inundates 
American eleven 33 to 13 in first grid 
clash between universities. Page 3 

Pritchard contrives scouting form 

Assistant coach copyrights unique 
method of tabulating facts about grid 
opponents. Page 3 

Team prepares for Swarthmore 

Intensive training given Staggmen 
with an eye toward the Saturday's 
clash. Page 3 

Features 
Horton Dining room 

Writer researches on make-up of 
typical meal as served to resident stu- 
dents. 

S 

Mrs. Ulrich Attends 
Placement Meeting 



THE 




Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY. OCTOBER 8, 



1940 



Progress Continues 
On Lanthorn Photos 



Number 9 




Mrs. Helen P. Ulrich, secretary of 
admissions of Susquehanna University, 
attended the second annual Fall Con- 
ference of the Pennsylvania Institu- 
tional Teacher Placement Association 
at Harrisburg in the Educational 
Building on Friday, October 4. 

Throughout the morning and after- 
noon sessions, reports were given by 
various authorities about the many 
problems facing education and place- 
ment officials today. 

One of the most interesting lectures 
given was that given on the topic, 
"What Information Do Employing Of- 
ficials Desire From Placement Offi- 
cials?" In the report the statement 
was clearly made that the combination 
of English and Social Sciences was too 
overcrowded, and that vacancies in 
that field in the future would be very 
scarce. 

The afternoon session opened with 
a talk about "Teachers, Supply and 
Demand." The supply and demand of 
teachers has now reached a point 
where one equals the other. In order 
to keep supply from outrunning de- 
mand, a prediction was made that pos- 
sibly in the future, five years of edu- 
cation would be required for secondary 
education teachers. 

From the statistics of all 1940 col- 
lege graduates in the teaching field, 
only thirty-four per cent were placed. 
Ninety-five per cent of all industrial 
arts teachers were placed, and only 
seventy per cent of all art and home 
economic teachers were placed. Any 
combination which includes Latin Is 
very good. 

The following list of the require- 
ments demanded of candidates for po- 
sitions in the business field: 

1. Ability to use good English. 

2. Must have good personality. 

* Must be in good physical condi- 
tion. 

4. Must make a good appearance. 

5. Participation in an activities pro- 
nun generally desired. 

6. Ages of 23 to 28 or 25 to 35 often 
.tressed, making it difficult, therefore, 
to place members of graduating class 
in such cases. 

7. Must be self-propelling. 

8. Employment during vacation per- 
iods. 

9. Free from debt. 

S 

Star Course Tickets 
Ready at Conservatory 

Dr. Sheldon, director of the conser- 
vatory, has announced that the stu- 
dent Star Course tickets will be avail- 
able at the office of the conservatory 
the remainder of the week. The hours 
at which students may call for their 
tickets i.s printed below. Each stu- 
dent must call personally for his own 
tickets. 

It is important that each one gets 
liis tickets early for the first concert 
1 -i the scries on Monday evening which 
is the noted Roth String Quartet, ac- 
claimed in both this country and in 
Europe alike. 

The schedule of hours is Wednesday: 
9-11 a. m.. 1:15-4:30 p. m; Thursday: 
9-10 a. m., 1:15-4 p. m.; Friday, 
9-11 a. m., 1:15-2:10 p. m.; Saturdav: 
9-12 a. m. 



During the past week much has been 
done to bring the 1940-41 Lanthorn 
nearer completion. All of the individ- 
ual pictures for the book have been 
taken and the resittings were completed 
on Monday. All the proofs have been 
turned in and are now in the hands of 
Mr. Breon of the Penn State Photo 
Shop. According to Nancy Griesemer, 
editor-in-chief, the group pictures will 
not be taken for several weeks. 

The sophomore and junior boys were 
given a fine opportunity to save their 
money when it was decided that they 
would be permitted to use their old 
Lanthorn pictures by paying a quarter! 
instead of having new pictures made. 

The book this year promises to be I 
one of the best books that has been 
produced for many years. 
S 

Stevens Shows Pictures 
On Old and New Mexico 

Professor Frederick Stevens was, 
guest speaker at the opening meeting 
of the Ladies Auxiliary on October 5th. 
Pis topic was "A Trip to Old and New 
Mexico." Colored pictures that were 
taken in the trip were shown. Professor 
Stevens commented on homes and foods 
of New Mexico. 

After Professor Stevens' talk, thel 

Z?5££2£lg£3L S£ ^cerpts from Late Act; Some Implications in 
pietion of the student Endowment ' Of Congress Legalizing A merica's First Peace- 
S^ bZ^T !i" Peacetime Conscription Time Conscription Act 



Speech Association 
Selects Debate Topic 



Willkie Lauds the Value of Debates; 
Topic Advocates American-British 
Commonwealth Union 



The staff photographer caught these snaps as the girls at the cottage became 
accustomed to life in their new home. Those in the cottage are: Misses 
Garner, president; Beer. Bowers, Cox, Forney, Griesemer, Grothe, Haffner, 
Krumbholz, Lauver, Turnbach, Walters, D. Williamson, and E. Williamson! 



COLLEGE MEN OVER TWENTY-ONE YEARS 
TO REGISTER ON CAMPUS, OCTOBER 16 



Two important things happened at 

the Pennsylvania Speech Association 

meeting in Harrisburg, Saturday. A 

message from Republican presidential 

: candidate Willkie was delivered to the 

i convention, and the college debating 

coaches chose the state debating topic 

I for this year. 

The message of the Republican pres- 
idential candidate, given to a Bucknell 
j student was read to the second annual 
! meeting of the Speech Association, 
j which in turn was to pass it on to 
| college and high school debaters all 
j over the country. 

Mr. Willkie, himself a former de- 
i bating coach in Coffeyville, Kansas, 
j told the college student: 

"I hope sincerely that you may as- 

| semble, may say what you will, when 

and where you will, for many years to 

come. Debate is a must in the demo- 

i cratic process. I have watched with in- 

| terest the careers of those who have 

learned to think and speak vividly on 

(Continued on Page 4) 



meeting of the General Auxiliary on 
November 2nd. After the meting, Miss 
Alma Jensen, Dean of Women, andj 
Miss Bertha Hein, School Nurse, were 
introduced and each told of her duties 
in the University. Mrs. T. W. Kretseh- 



The Committee of Education and 
National D >linse of the American 
Council of Education has issued in- 
formation ui interest to officials and 
students m institutions of higher edu- 
cation regarding the Selective Train- 
ing and Service act of 1940. 

According to information received 
from Liie County Cumniiasioiicio, a 
Registration Board will be set up on 
the campus on next Wednesday, Oc- 
tober 16, for the purpose of register- 
ing college students who come within 
Those on the campus who knew Mrs. I tne terms of the registration bill. 



mann presided at the meeting, and 
Mrs. William A. Russ was chairman of 
the Social Committee. 

S 

Mrs. Sadtler Expires 
At Selinsgrove Home 



W. A. Sadtler, of West Pine street, 
were saddened to hear of her death as 
a result of an automobile collision in 
Newington, Conn., where she was visit- 
ing. Her acquaintance with Susque- 
hanna began many years ago when 
her husband, Dr. Sadtler, a noted 
Lutheran preacher, accepted a teach- 
ing position in the Susquehanna Theo- 
logical Seminary and continued as her 
sons graduated from the University. 
Since that time her interest in the 
welfare of the college did not diminish. 



Provisions Relating to Education 

1. Sec. 3(a) All male students, ex- 
cept advanced R.O.T.C. students as 
noted below, who on the day of regis- 
tration "have attained the twenty- 
first anniversary of the day of their 
birth and who have not attained the 
thirty-sixth anniversary of the day of 
their birth" must register. 

2. Sec. 5<f> "Any person who, dur- 
ing the year 1940, entered upon atten- 
dance for the academic year 1940- 

( Continued on Page 4) 



By DR. WILLIAM A. RUSS, JR. 

I have said on other occasions that 
the United States is now a mature 
country and that as such it must pro- 
ceed to do certain things which would 
have been unnecessary in the wild, 
carefree days of its youth. Candidate 
Willkie to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing we are no longer youthiul. m our 
earlier days we could declare war and 
then prepare for war, expecting the 
enemy politely to wait until we were 
ready. In all our wars we have done 
this and we have always paid for it 
in unnecessary casualties and defeats. 
Ask any World War veteran and he 
will tell you about the way in which 
green, untrained men were sent into 
the trenches in France and all too often 
slaughtered because they did not know 
how to handle themselves as soldiers. 
In short, in the War of the Revolu- 
tion, the War of 1812, the Civil War 
• both sides), the Spanish War and in 
the first World War, we impetuously 
went into the conflict unprepared. We 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Luther Redcay Talks 
Before Pi Gamma Mu 



Student Surveys Horton' s Gastronomical Situation 
Finding It Well Cared For by Dietitian Humphrey 



The second monthly meeting of Pi 
Gamma Mu was held Monday evening 
at the home of Miss Beatrice Herman, 
honorary member of the group; the 
guest speaker of the evening was Mr. 
Luther Redcay, executive director of 
public assistance for Snyder county, 
who spoke to the group on the topic, 
"History and Development of Public 
Assistance." 

Joseph Pasterchik, president of the 
honor society, presided at the meeeting. 

The meeting was conducted in the 
form of an open forum— after Mr. Red- 
cay had outlined the development of 
the various methods of caring for the 
poor through the ages, the various 
members engaged in a discussion of 
methods for solving the problem as we 
have it today. 

Before closing the meeting Mr. Pas- 
terchik announced that the next meet- 
ing, to be held November 4 at 7:30 p. 
m. in Steele Science will be open to 
the public. At that time Dr. Sidney 
E. Bateman, Mifflinburg, Pa., will speak 
on, "Thomas A. Edison as I Knew 
Him." Dr. Bateman is probably the 
only man alive today who actually as- 
sociated with Edison while he worked 
on the incandescent lamp in Sunbury. 



There's no point in keeping the se- 
cret. Like all closeted skeletons, this 
one will out. Susquehanna students 
don't like eggs for breakfast. Why? 
Mrs. Humphrey, the college dietitian— 
I gracious, white-haired lady — doesn't 
know for sure; but she suspects it's a 
matter of education. Freshmen, es- 
pecially, need to be adventurous and 
sample cooking, even if Mother didn't 
make it. 

S. U.'s in a rut when it comes to 
eating habits. The upperclassmen 
don't like to try new foods, either. Mrs. 
Humphrey, nothing if not timely, de- 
cided last year, to be appropriate. It 
seems the S. C. A. that week was shin- 
ing on a Chinese lecturer. When the 
students sal down to their meal, the 
waiters placed an exotic foreign dish 
before them. 

"I can't understand it. They just 
didn't take to that chop suey," 

Nine years of cooking for students 
with an overwhelming desire to — at 
least— eat, have taught Mrs. Humphrey 
a few tricks of the dietetical trade, 
though, She has learned to buy in 
quantities — but quantities. 

But Quantity 

A sample breakfast consists of twen- 
ty pounds of bacon, eight loaves of 
bread, from three to four gallons of 
cocoa, and a crate of canteloupes. 

Lunch may be seventy-five quarts of 
chili con carne, and from four to five 
gallons of canned fruit. 

Dinner calls for two bushels of po- 
tatoes, ninety to a hundred pounds of 
meat, and thirty -six heads of cauli- 



flower, and six dozen oranges (orange 
salad ) . 

When you consider that Susque- 
hanna is not a large college, and when 
you remember that not more than 
three- fourths of the students eat in 
the dining room, you get some idea 
of the collective Susquehanna hunger. 

"The average student gets enough to 
I eat, and we try"— emphasis on the try 
—"to fill up the athletes." 

; They Also Serve 

The dietitian's constant joy is the 
; waiters. Their bonhomie enlivens 
■ mealtimes. "They cut up like gentle- 
men." The twelve gentlemen and a 
head waiter serve twenty-four tables 



Lubold arrives to start the fires, and 
pare the potatoes for the day witli the 
automatic parer. At six -thirty the 
ladies arrive and busy themselves with 
the preparations for the three meals 
to be dished out. Tire prevalent idea 
that each meal is prepared individually 
can now be discarded. Those versa- 
tile Indies work on all three all day. 
Mrs. Humphrey arrives at seven-thirty 
to plot out the day's menus and to 
oversee the industry involved. By one- 
thirty breakfast and luncheon are 
washed up. At five the force is back 
at work for a six o'clock dinner; they 
finish by eight. 
Careful Rules 
Strict are the rules the food mer- 



S. C. A. Begins Drive 
To Secure Members 



a meal. To quote again, "Chester ! chants and the kitchen staff must ad- 



Shusta and his staff have done very 
well." Then, enigmatically, "Of all 
meals, the waiters like soup meals 
best." The only drawback to any meal 
is gravity, which occasionally pulls a 
I tray out of surprised hands and crashes 
lit with nerve-shattering force on the 
floor. 

Nine years of concocting appetizing 
food for Horton Hall diners have giv- 
en Mrs. Humphrey a blase attitude 
toward big dinners. She takes them 
in her stride. "However, I would be 
phazed if it weren't for my efficient 
force of waiters and helpers." 
Helpers Gastronomical 

There are six regular and three re- 
lief helpers— employes in the kitchen. 
They are the ones who do the stirring, 
and slicing, and washing and . . . and 
. . . and. Their routine begins at 
five thirty in the morning, when Mr. 



here to. First and foremost, suppos- 
edl\ fresh lood must be fresh, or it's 
returned, Nothing's too good for the 
freshmen, sophomores, etc. 

The other major rule is cleanliness. 
The kitchen is nothing, if not spic. 

Early twilight last Friday, while the 
above information was being divulged, 
the staff was busy frying fish, parley- 
ing and buttering potatoes, slicing to- 
matoes, and garnishing pineapple tapi- 
oca with cherries. Regular patrons of 
Mrs. Humphrey's culinary endeavors 
can attest to the excellence of the 
fish, the potatoes, and the tomatoes; 
but I personally testify to that pine- 
apple tapioca! The intriguing smells 
which later brought on student sat- 
iation were disturbing tire salivary 
glands. 

Mrs. Humphrey, surveying her kitch- 
en kingdom, said, "I enjoy cooking for 
them." 



Today the Student Christian Asso- 
ciation begins its annual membership 
drive. It is needless to set forth rea- 
sons why the upperclassmen will join 
this organization, for they have seen 
the work it does and they know that 
it fills a genuine need on the campus. 
However, it may be well to explain 
some of the work of the S. C. A. for 
the benefit of freshmen and other new 
students. 

Like all organizations, the S. C. A. 
was set up with certain views in mind 
—views worthy of a Christian group. 
It helps the new Susquehannan become 
adjusted to his new life at college. To 
this end the S. C. A. aids greatly in 
the administration's Freshman Week 
activities. It aims at keeping students 
interested in church even though they 
may be away from the influences of 
home. It promotes friendship— an im- 
portant part of college life— by var- 
ious methods including parties and 
hikes. It raises moral and religious 
ideals through its meetings and dis- 
cussions. In addition to student-led 
meetings, there are speakers from out- 
side the college who contribute con- 
siderably to the spiritual life of the 
S. C. A. The Sunday evening vespers 
and the Wednesday morning chapel 
are both under the supervision of this 
organization. 

In short, this is the Student Chris- 
tian Association of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity, and in order to carry on its 
work it wants every Susquehannan H 
a member. 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELIXSGROVE, PA. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1940 

THE SUSQUEHANNA ^-joe AESOP SPEAKS" MAY f^^- 

Published Weekly Throughoul the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- ! j " ™ j "" " " ~" • • OU VJljIl*v3 1 

mas semester and Vacations, the same being the regularly stated Once upon a Time there was a Chauncey went on, "The theory orig- 

Intervals as required by the Post Office Department. Transfer named Chauncey— a Junior inated in Scandinavia with the bard. WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

— - , , — — — he was. He had long straight hair, a Sien Noodelborgsen, in his verse, to . s ... 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42, Circulation Manager. . Y crooked wit- ,, ;\ • 

— "- '*»' """" " *""-'""■' '■"■ " S ™ "" °'" M " tm - Sh •' ™- *•" *» a„ in „„ ££££2, ™"„ a.*! 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. Chauncey was an Intellectual. A vast awakening brings beth's time finds Errol Flynn right in 

Member of National College Press Association. He proved That the first time he From proud Eternity, ^ elemen1 Flynn is cast as tne lead . 

, ^TT ^"Tj 1 ~~ ~Z i 7ZT attended the "Introduction to Medieval Who writhes. , , '„ T ' T ,., vk ' Hnrp'ripvil nHva. 

Represented lor National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc.. „ classical Thcorv" class Svmbol from Infinity, " ° ,, ' dale i cl f vl1 P iva " 

' College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., Europe ^Ctasrical ™^J****- Be Thou Retribution- teers who prey on the mighty galleons 

Chicaeo Boston Los Anngeles, San Francisco. Th< Piofessoi spoaed him immc isc rnou Keuioution . n He attacks and sinks a 

— cliately. Chauncey continued. Baucer immor- >h ^ the g ft 

THE STAFF "Heh. heh,' he cackled to himself, talized the theory in this verse from ambassado ,, CLuicic Rains> and his 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER mentally waxing a Purely Imaginary his 'wonneruce : ]ii( , ri , Brenda Marshall, taking them 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE Moustache-Handlebar variety. "An- " 'For givag dardel wat at lys prisoners aboard his own ship. 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner other Stooge!" And on the floy tinge avit f oo . ' 

Manag ng Editor 'llli:::: . . . Forrest Heckert H e posed a Question. Chauncey stopped and looked Raptly . Traitorous court politics get Flynn 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk «. C hauncev, erumph, can you tell us at the Professor. He had Fooled him, & trouble over his affair and he is 

sport s Edil or Charles Gundrum 80me thing about medieval theory." he Knew. brought before the queen, chastized, 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten Thp v { ciim arose The Professor gazed back - also and later forgiven. More pitched sea 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, "41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle , Chauncev intoned «j trust Raptlv, thinking, "Never again— an 'A' baltles until F < no1 is captured and put 

B^^^ r y ° U d r S t °Jtt°ZZ KET 3nd Changed thC SUbJCCt «"^^\Sff2 

^s^s^srsr m ' ' 43; Harry wilcox ' ' 43: Dorothy wil " ssrMSfr* the Ps>chlc ua ^ «**& be *** ta «. ^ = «* ™ »* ***** T 

CircuS Maimer Maxine Heefner The Professor had never heard of a football player Behind Chauncey. gainst King Phillip s Armada in that 

Ciiculation Managei ^ ^^ ^ ^ he Nodded wisdy ^^ ^ The Truth! great naval battle that marks the birth 

Advertising Managers j che ster Shusta and said , -That's just the one I Want- Moral: A stitch in Time Saves a oi one «"»* natlon wd lhe fal1 of an " 

| Frank Corcoran cd!" Whole Year's Studying. Other, 

Assistants • -, jj oro i ^y Webber ^^_____________.^_^______________^__.______^___-_«____— — Tnc marine photography, especially 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. ~ ~~T~~~7~T-, the b&tae Kenes ' arc excellent - 

TUESDA Y, OCTOBER 8, 1940 ODDS JN ll/JNDS FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

niMVITR 1<5 RFTVr KFRVFIl ■ The Return of Frank James 

IJlAitnn, 13 oci^u sciivnv ThPv'rP nil nnnri Hole the fiddle sec- Tms sequel of last season's Jesse 

We resident students at Susquehanna take this opportun- !»»*- reminLscence . 2* ^dTare S*?^ St J— deals with Henry Fonda, ef- 
ity to express hearty appreciation to Mrs. Anna Humphrey wno penance ' preparation, rest, sleep, and used to it. Kay Kyser does "Charming forts to avenge the death of his broth- 
has served faithfully and conscientiously as dietitian for the daydreaming. Afterthought-Studying. Little Faker" and 'Hazy and Blue" J^^ e ^™Sl^i.v5iiS 
4 ■ „,.„ strav strands of woolgathering: Won- for Columbia. Nice. Charlie Barnet bJ Uie law. oene iieinev is a gin le 
past nine years. JJ what JJ J^S win ° e whcn SPt out soniething called "Comanche *>«* who bdieves that Frank isnt a 

Working with her staff of assistants, Mrs. Humphrey has the lettcl . from the Wai . Department War Dance." solid. Whiteman'a b|id guy at heart, which of course is 

freed herself from the criticisms SO often directed at one hold- comes, or will a letter come? . . . Sup- "Chloe." Pew. Poor Chloe. "Whis- obvious from the start. 

f •+ i to et, 1 H r.t lif« rosing S. U. won this week and the pcring Grass." Ahhh. Anything at all Lots of gun-play and very good 

mg a post SO Vital lO Student mi. wepk aftpi , tha( . and the week aftpr by Du k e Ellington. Don's sell the man technicolor photography makes the pic- 

As Student patrons Of Horton Dining Room we will do well thal? ' what if_skip it.. Pity the poor short. Fred Waring still writes fight ture well worth seeing, but don't ex- 

tO consider the difficulties involved in the operation Of a college coed:-If she obeys all the rules, she's songs for nice people that ask for them, pect it to be as good as Jesse James. 

dining room in order to better appreciate the efficiency of our ^ao«": £ &°£fi °° " "" °" !? - - »™i " 

system. First the budget must be balanced; we believe Mrs. out if she studieSi she ' S a grind . . . stuff The Great McGinty 

Humohrev exercises wise discretion in the expending Of the If she talks a lot, she's got a line, if Temple over Boston College. Wake A picture that was obviously meant 

1 ' ^, , . . , ,> s)lP Hnesn't she's a social flon If Forest over Clemson, Purdue over for the bottom half of a double feature. 

funds allotted to her. The proper calory apportionment must ^ ^^i foS wLs, she Michigan State. Syracuse over N. Y. U.. Some good acting might have lifted 

be calculated; here our dietitian makes constant use Of the makeK a f00l f herself— if she doesn't. Northwestern over Ohio State. Santa its not half bad plot from the realms 

traininu which She received "he lacks spirit ... If she speaks to Clara over Stanford, and Oshkosh over of mediocrity. But it didn't. 

_. b + . „ wi„ nM Li» m nf n i Dnt ,;„ n . t„, n v-mnrlrprl ■*« evervone on the campus, she's naive Cripple Creek. There goes my aver- - - - 

Then comes the big problem of pleasing two hundied stu- i . f ^ &Msa% j£ & gnob oge t stm have a fighting chance on Tuesday 

dents reared in different homes With as many different idio- Many thanx t0 college Humor. Cincinnati too. The Prexy of Phi Mu Turnabout 

SVncracies regarding the satisfaction Of their gastronomical liked his siestas last year, but this year This one is fast, inside, and low. But 

sjiiuatito "b" " b e DISKussions— it's worse. He just must "siesta." Fam- very good. John Hubbard and Carol 

Ul'ges. Some Students cannot, 01' Will not, eat certain looas, yet, ArUfl BhftW pQps up agam with a ous come backs: Frank James, tests, Landls start out as a busy executive 

they must be pleased and properly nourished. new series of waxings done bv Victor, and our football team. Olive Oyl. and his sophisticated wife; but before 

Ali these problems must be dealt with in the daily routine . ^ the picture is ten minutes old their 

mi uitoc piuwiv,mo iuu j positions are exactly reversed, thanks 

of a dietitian. Our praise goes out to one who handles them so < ( /^ A "\/T"DT TC T~'TT^~RT'T'Q" t0 thc intervention of an Indian jinni. 

we ll. V^X\1V11 KJ O 1 JLJLJ JJl 1 vj We have here a situation. 

At the risk of being accused of "handshaking" let us say — == 7iT~ S i^4. 

that we appreciate, also, the outstanding orderliness and effi- Have you ever heard a visitor to football and father of Susquehanna lo the Editor 

iiiai wc a^iit ix t, Susquehanna University comment on University's Coach A. A. Stagg. Jr.. is 

ciency with which the Horton Dining Room operates, busque- thc bpauty of om . campus? Somet hing limelighted in several scenes of "Knute Dear Mr. Editor: 

hanna ranks high in inter-COllegiate circles both in the quality nk e this: "What a lovely spot for our Rockne." The following day. Coach As one of the -lonesome twenty-six" 

Of meals served and in the student attitude found in her dining sons and our daughter's development.'' Stagg and his College of the Pacific T want t0 let the students and the 

Uiimrt , , , , , , „ 4 ,° situated along a river with mountains football team invaded the Notre Dame WO rld in general know about an inex- 

room. We should do all we can to preserve and advance tms fm , a backgroimd gusquehanna urn- gridiron to contend the Irish of south cus . lblc situation. Perhaps the resi- 

Wholesome situation. vewity has one of the most beautiful Bend in a struggle that found the dent; . ol Hassinger and Seibert Halls 

Let US Suggest to the freshman boys that they follow the natural campuses In the country. Di- score standing 7-7, at the half-time. do not know th at there are twenty- 

u B "B» W " ' J J . wse opinions lead to the conclusion The Irish scored only three more K i x isolated souls living within the dark 

example set by some reliable upper-classmen wnen in uouot as that the founders of SusqU ehanna Uni- touchdowns in a hectic second half to walLs of gelinagrovi Hail utterly with- 

to What courtesies are in order. We say this remembering the veraity could hardly have chosen ■ win 25-7. The game was a moral vie- out communication with the outer 
omhamuwinff PXtieriences of our freshman orientation period better region in which to erect a Ctta- tory for Coach Stagg when one con- world WE KAVE NO TELEPHONE. 

embanassing experiences oi oui iresnman unenuftuuu ptiiuu ^ ^ learning . So picturesque is this riders that the college of the Pacific whv? Ls k becaUHL , we don . t need 

and realizing that all lreshmeil must lace a Similar period OI SuKauehanna River valley that Dr. is comparatively smaller than Notre one? Many a cold winter night has 

adjustment Dunkelberger is presently engaged in Dame. This proves the illustrious coach seen i it tle bands of our number wend 

For the consideration Of those Who are interested in im- touring Snyder County compiling notes can still show the sports world a thing a wearisome path to Hassinger in 

,. , ,. • for completion of his forthcoming or two. search of a bit of information con- 

proving our dining room we would suggest that dinner music book .. A History of Snydel . County ,- - - - cernins om . . sludieK Thcse are the 

be introduced. We believe that SUCh a policy WOUld be quite to be published next summer. The fac- In this issue of the Susquehanna, things that could be conveyed through 
v^ociKir, nn,l miitn MrlvflntnopniK ulty and student body join this paper male students over 21 will find the ne- the medium of modern telephony, 

possible and quitt advantageous ■ Y „ pn , ivp tn : nnno , n . ta wishing Dr. Dunkelberger much sue- cessary details for draft registration. In loved 

It would be easy and comparatively inexpensive to maugui- t , ( , ss for his painstaki . ng effort s and line with this, we report developments on( , s ba , k h( , ln( , bul ' l0 noavail . usual . 

ate The phonograph Used in the SOCial rooms or a second hand are looking forward to an interesting of war education on the American cam- ly W( , n&ng .„ ( , n h(>ai . a caU came fgf 
one of Us type, along with a small repertoire of semi-popular >^-££-* b ^™« of ° ur ^^X^TmZl"^- B te^teST/^ oT^TbS £? 
and Ught-ClaSSical recordings WOllld be sufficient. A collection Alma MatC1 ' . . . Kor . is conducting a course on gunnery J^LTSS . l«!n"!.d "or JeieWe; 

taken from students in the dining room should go a long way King football reigns, with each and the proper mathematical caicuia- lj((n attached? 

, ,, „* spnson's nitiskin uarade comes an era tionns for flat-firing guns. Harvard _...., , 

toward the necessary amount, 7Z^^%U>^. Of prime University's faculty organized a uni, No. La, ,ot these reasons has been 

We believe that music played during the evening meal in|( . nM t0 Sllst(1R , hanna students is to mobilize the university's resources tned and found wanting What other 

would tend to lessen the amount of noise and would greatly Warner Brot hers- -Knute Rockne" ^ P^J^^^ ~ ^^ SSn? TTan andentTup^tiot 

improve the general atmosphere. The idea is sound from both «^»^Jtt&£ SStUtlTS tL'SSLT - unaunnounUble technical problem; 

the sociological and the hygienic points Of View. 4 Amos Xlonzo Stagg, veteran dean of lense. ^ ^atanllcltTmakea tt! hart to tW? 

This idea has been applied with success in other college .^^.. tkm^i Hokil *Dowti^ Williamson; program, Doris verj reipectfully, 

dining rooms; Ursinus is the most recent to come to our atten- . h H'k Welch; dcmoHMhing, Batty Rene Bmith. One of the Twenty-tto 

tion, Why cannot Susquehanna be the next to announce the nl,ua l,s _^ e S ~~T~. , , .. , ~77~l~7* — , 

i.- 'n T , . 4 , .. T ., „ ^ m m. "Mpw PltM»l*fi Tnf rndurPfl Harbeson, Ilothilla Load 

innovation' Led by the song, "In My Heart There litw v iittin liiuuuuttu 

, .««.» ^t^t. c.w.v/- Rtof" ■ Melody," almost a hundred I> v G r »hliplpr illlH KllllO S ' A ' *' Ves l M>r Service 

I HEAR SUSQUEHANNA SlN(iIN(l gil .^ on thf , Illt(1 ( ,,on. Rush Hike l >y BOMWIWiny mint 

"In mv heart there rums a melody" and in a few, fleeting paraded through the streets of Selina- Sunday evening vespers were led by 

' J, ■ * h „_. „-- \ as r(m(U L ol ] fehP cammis Stu- 8TOVe to a camp Bre by Penn'l Creek Friday nights pep rally could have E]sli , HocheU a; Faith Harbeson was 

moments this cheery song has conquered th< campus, stu ^ Thlll . sdav been a continuation of the rally a week th( , Bpeftkeri A , iu;ll . t( ,, comp0ied of 

dents, look back upon your matter-ol-lact acceptance of class- -^ lont , brisk hike ma{ „. ( , v , rMmr ago they displayed the same pep, the Hllth NaNlol . Ruth Bchwenk, Nancy 

loom routine and the rather mechanical schedule of life as you hungry. *nd the hot dogs, potato chips, "«ne spirit, and the same fun. It was ril . it , sr!n( , r . 1U(1 Mt .i, ss;l S moot sang 

i ■ l ,i Z „i- .,on p B n iinii nn« rliar-irard the ™& marahmallows disappeared at rec- great to hear the enthusiasm, and the ,. Th( sl , u)1 Hun . No MortV , ac . 

experienced it a short week ago. Can you, now, durcgara the ^ ^^ Evpn ^ ^^ jm conIi(lin( ,, ln th( , ^m that ths stu- companitT , by u 

catchy, lilting air Which Dr. Ross Stover brought with him? W(T( , ,, lllllly long beforc schedule. Pop- dents displayed. Faith men tioned in her speech that 

All throughout the school We call detect an increased Vigor Oicles and cokes topped ofl the supper. Glenn Schueler introduced a new we should better OUT past by looking to 

, " .. , , , ___ . , | . , „, i vl ,,i. jn fbn i-, nll( j As darkness fell, each sorority sang cheer tliat he used in high school— the future in such B way that we will 

and spirited enthusiasm which can be traced hack to the hous u lmditjoMal tm$ nml ^^ i)r! ,, m ( , ulll(m ,, ih;l M ,. ri , Tne idea is t0 .. nib - bt . M , air(1 on tlu , ^ ht hand of Uu , 

ing of our vocal talents on Tuesday morning. No longer can t() i rau , lor holllt , The majority of U into the opponents, get them excited, judgment m 

we recard our former attitude of life as sufficient, becaUM this the girls went borne the same way they and they won't know what they are i ; , benediction yas pronounced by 

, . , ,;„ l, _ ,,,.., „., .,,.,. ,, ,;,,,,;,,,,. f nr came, singing all the way. doing. Chuck Kline also christened a 1} ,.. T ,\ V . Kret,ehmann. 

song has brought to us a realization that we are a singing, toi- ^ «jj ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r( , w (lH1( , r _„.. sis Boom Bah; . Wlth tw0 T!u , progra|n was condut . lod by sig . 
ward-marching group Of students. ,. a cll . yi>1 . way - noino The dryer waj 1,lnn ' 'heers, now we have twice m bu Alpha [ota sorority m one of a 

Lei US nol forget that In addition tO this new theme SOng, was |ui1 about three miles longer! But lna "v 'hues to yell. Right? ,, , o! .« pet se rvteOS to be conduct- 

We have B Wealth Of musical literature springing up from our eT«l the las, group arrived a, Seibert Various members of the squad talked ed by the various sororities. 

., , . . ,. happy though tired and ready for - and they seemed to think that if the S 

own campus members. I rein to the vibrant harmonies oi oui b00ks "Welsh" coal wm thrown on flurjuc A word to the wise use both your 

Alma Mater Hymn. Committee chairmen were: food, hanna would pin their ears back. eyes. 






I 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 












THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<»- 



-♦ 



As Crusaders "Threw on Welsh Coal" Saturday Crusaders Sharpen 

Spear for Garnets 




Zeravica Crosses Goal After Twenty-one Yard Run in First Period to Begin 

Saturday's Scoring Spree 

AMERICAN IINMRSITY YIELDS BEFORE 

ORANGE AND MAROON CRUSADE, 33-13 

Isaacs Repeats Spectacular Running to Score 
Twice; Zeravica, Wos, and Heaton Also Cross 
Goal; Fugler Receives Passes for American 
Scores 



Pulling out of the mud in the second 
half, after being the underdogs in the 
second period, 13-7, Coach Stagg's 
henchmen pulled the lever on the bomb 
rack three times to roll up a 33-13 
score against a fighting American Uni- 
versity eleven. The sensational 55 yard 
run by Larry Isaacs, who snake-hipped 
from his own 45 yard line to cross the 
border, was the high-spot of the after- 
noon's thrills. 
First Quarter 

Zuback kicked-off for the Orange 
and Maroon, to Sprinkle who advanced 
it to his 30 yard line. After a series of 
line smashes, American University was 
forced to kick into Isaacs' hands who 
brought the ball up to his 36. Between 
Wos, Helm and Isaacs the home team 
wiggled up to the visitor's 22-yard line, 
where the ball was lost on downs. An 
off-side penalty slapped the American 
University boys back to their 16, and 
after a few tries they lost the ball on 
downs. Wos slammed the line for a 
10-yard gain but unfortunately fumbled 
and American had free sway of the 
ball on the Orange and Maroon 24-yard 
stripe. A rugged defense pushed the 
Washington eleven back to their 4-yard 
stripe, where they punted in a des- 
perate attempt to get out of a tight 
jam. Isaacs ran the punt to American 
U.'s 26-yard line and after line smashes 
Zeravica broke loose for a 21-yard run 
to make the first score of the game. 
Heaton piled on another point when 
he converted from placement. 

Zuback kicked-off, Simpson advanc- 
ed the ball to his 34, and a first down 
was gained on the middle stripe as the 
quarter ended. 
Second Quarter 

Again Coach Stagg's men put on the 
heat, forcing the visitors to kick. Get- 
ing the ball on their 18 yard line and 
pulling a penalty for off-sides the home 
team gave the ball back to the opposi- 
tion, when Heaton punted. Three plays 
later Meyers nabbed a visitor's pass 
from the air and ran it to his 28-yard 
line, thus killing a scoring threat that 
looked imminent. Making no head-way 
Isaacs kicked to the visitor's 38. Tak- 
ing to the air, after no gains could be 
made on the ground, Sprinkle shot a 
pass to Simpson to gain a first down 
on the Susquehanna 31-yard line. 
Again Sprinkle worked in the air as 
In- tossed a pass to Fugler who romped 
a doss the line for the visitor's first 
tally. The extra-point was made good 
by placement to tie the score 7-7. Zu- 
back grabbed Payne's kickoff but fum- 
bled and after the scuffle American U. 
bad possession of the ball on the Or- 
ange and Maroon's 32-yard line. In t lie 
air again, Sprinkle lightly tossed an 
over-the-line pass to Simpson who 
l Tossed the boundary to put the Dis- 
trict of Columbia eleven in the lead 7- 
13. Payne kicked-off for American U. 
lo end the second quarter. 
Third Quarter 

After the kick-off by Payne, Coach 
Stagg's boys found the going difficult 
and were forced to punt. The ball came 
back to the home team when the vis- 
itors were held to no gain. A short 
pass by Wos to Heaton for nine yards 
and an end run by Isaacs placed the 
ball on the 9-yard line of enemy ter- 
ritory. The score board changed again 



when Isaacs opened up for 7 yards and 
Wos crashed over the line to tie the 
game. Heaton pushed the home team 
ahead by one point when he converted 
the extra-point by placement. A punt- 
ing duel ensued after Heaton kicked- 
off. The visitors received the kick on 
their 12-yard line, were forced to punt, 
but the ball came right back when the 
Staggmen punted back to their 15- 
yard line. Attempting a short lateral, 
Simpson tossed the ball into Heaton's 
hands who was in the open to score 
the third touchdown, but missed the 
extra-point when the ball leaned too 
far to the left side of the uprights. 
Fourth Quarter 

Opening the fourth period, Zuback 
kick-off, only to receive the ball four 
plays later when the opposition failed 
to make an air attack click. Advanc- 
ing the ball to American U.'s 37, the 
home team lost the ball on downs, but 
picked it up two plays later when 
Simpson attempted to pass which was 
intercepted by Isaacs who brought the 
pill up to the enemy's 17-yard line. 
A quick pass from Wos to Isaacs stop- 
ped the ball on the 9 yard line. On a 
fake, Isaacs cleared right end to score 
the fourth marker and Heaton made 
the extra point by placement. 27-13. 
The Washington boys gave up the ball 
on downs after the kickoff which 
started a drive for the home team. 
Wos picked up four yards, and Isaacs 
scattered the line for 17 more. Again 
Isaacs toted the ball to snake-hip 55 
yards to boost the score 33-13. Again 
the Orange and Maroon took the ball 
from the visitors on downs and ad- 
vanced it in rapid strides to the 10- 
yard line only to lose out in a desperate 
attack to score before the whistle 
sounded to end the game. 

(Continued on Page 4) 
S 



With two victories under their belts, 
Susquehanna's Crusaders go into a 
week of hard training in preparation 
lor the first away game of the season 
with Swarthmore this week end. In 
hopes of keeping their slate clear of 
defeat the boys will probably work on 
that fumbling jinx which is still both- 
ering them and concentrate on perfect- 
ing their pass defense. 

Despite a rough game, they emerged 
with only a few bruises and cuts, no 
major injuries being incurred. Steve 
Zeravica was not used a great deal, 
giving his foot a much needed rest, and 
should be in good shape this Saturday 
along with the rest of the squad. 

The coming meeting with Swarth- 
more will extend a long, though not 
continuous, foctball relation farther. 
They first appeared on Susquehanna's 
roster in 1923 and won that initial 
scrap. 9-0. Since then, nine more games 
have been played. Susquehanna taking- 
three and Swarthmore the remainder. 

One of the four undefeated teams in 
Pennsylvania last year, the Garnet ag- 
gregation was considerably weakened 
by graduation. Only two regulars re- 
turned for this season, Capt. Tony De- 
gutis. a blocking back, and Fred Don- 
nelly, a tackle. Around these men, 
Coach Lew Elverson, a former Penn 
backfield star, has built up a fast team. 
a little on the light side where weight 
is concerned. Besides the above men- 
tioned, other players worthy of note 
are Fred Reed and Bill Richards in the 
backfield, and Jack Duggan, George 
Wright, and Chuck Cryer on the line. 

Swarthmore won its opening clash 
with Washington College at Chester- 
town, Maryland, last week by the score 
of 14-7 and is being primed for the 
battle with us. 

Looking over last week's scores, the 
coming tilts continue the line of stiff 
competition: Juniata followed in its 
winning ways by toppling Thiel 18-0, 
and Moravian was the victor in its 
game with Brooklyn College. Although 
C. C. N. Y., Hartwick, and Allegheny 
met defeat, they should not be regard- 
ed as push-overs. 



Pritchard Copyrights 
Unique Scouting: Form 

Bob Pritchard, line coach and scout 
at Susquehanna University, has just ! 
developed a compact and complete 
scouting report which is now being of- \ 
fered by leading sporting goods houses. 
The report was recently copyrighted 
and is known as the Pritchard Football 
Scouting Report. 

According to leading coaches and 
athletic directors, this scouting report 
is the last word in accurate scouting. 
It catches the main essentials as well 
as details and covers every phase of the 
game. It is also designed to be one of 
the most compact reports of its kind. 
Most of the report is recorded by trac- 
ing markers through slots on both sides 
ol a hard cardboard cover. 

Pritchard graduated from Susque- 
hanna in 1936 after transferring from 
Penn State, and played two years var- 
sity tackle. He taught and served as 
assistant coach at Berwick high school 
for one year before returning to the 
campus as assistant to Stagg. Last sum- 
mer he completed work for his M.A. in 
phytic*] education at Penn State. 

The Susquehanna staff extends its 
collective congratulations to Mr. Prit- 
chard for this achievement. May he 
continue his efficiency in all of his 
undertakings. 



Phi Mu Conquers Frosh 
To Upset Predictions 

Friday, October 4, freshman expecta- 
tions were badly bent by a rugged Phi 
Mu touch team over whom they had 
previously anticipated victory. The 
freshmen threatened to cross the goal 
several times but were held back by 
the hard fighting Phi Mu boys. The 
frat's aerial attack was too much for 
the determined first year men as they 
were beaten 12 to 0. In the first quart- 
er the scoring was started by a pass 
from Jones to Kaufman who made it 
good. The second touchdown was also 
a pass, from Milford to Smith, thus 
making the final score. The players for 
the victorious team were: John Jones, 
Don Stiber, Eugene Smith, James Mil- 
ford, Joe Zavarich, and Jack Walsh 
substituting. 

The freshman team consisted of the 
following members: Dave Lohmann, 
Ralph Brown, Bill Jansan, Ray Hoch- 
stuhl, James Clark. Glenn Schuller, 
Ray Eskels, and Dick Moglia. 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



BINGAMAN'S 2SS 

Sandwiches— Hot Beef. Ham, E^r. 

Weiner, Cheese, Hamburger 

Vegetable Soup. Baked Beans, 

Ice Cream 

1 W. PINE ST. SELINSGROVE 




•s 



FOR 



Everything Musical 

INCLUDING ALL MAKES OF 

RECORDS 



34!) Market St. 



Sunbury, Pa. 



Girls' Inter-Class and 
Varsity Hockey Begins 

Class hockey game! are schedul 
start week after next and in the mean- 
time. Miss Shine has been giving the 
gym classes hockey testa which they 
must pass in order to be eligible to 
play in the class games. All - 
except the Freshman class, have elected 
their captains. The Freshman cap- 
tain will be chosen from the group ol 
Freshman girls out for varsity hotk- 
ey. These girls will be given a test 
and the girl scoring the highesl will 
become the captain, Each captain is 
supposed to be able to referee a game 
oi hockey and during the last week 
these girls have been learning to 
referee. 

Practice for the Varsity Hockey Club 
has finally hit its full stride The girls 
are eager and anxious to improve their 
game and Miss Shure is working hard 
to help them improve their playing. 
Each girl must pass certain tests in 
order to be eligible for the Honor 
Hockey Team and they have been 
working on these tests during the last 
few weeks. 

strand 

T H t A T R | 
sunbury 



NOW SHOWING 

Mickey Rooney 
Judy Garland 

PAUL WHITEMAN & ORCHESTRA 
in 

"STRIKE UP THE 
BAND" 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

Wallace Beery 
Leo Carrillo 



in 



ii\\!\Z 



WYOMING" 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

Ginger Rogers 

Ronald Colman 

in 

"Lucky Pardners" 



a 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSOROVE 

• • ■ 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

"SEA HAWK" 

With 

Errol Flynn 

Brenda Marshall 

Claude Rains 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

Return of Frank 
James" 

With 

Henry Fonda 
Gene Tierney 
Jackie Cooper 

MONDAY 

"The Great 
McGinty" 

With 

Brian Donlevy 
Muriel Anjrclus 

TUESDAY 

Adolphe Menjou 
John Hubbard 
Carole Landin 



in 



"Turnabout" 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Peiieils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE. PA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Frylingr's Stationery 
Store 

111 Market St.. Banbury, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The Ssttolfl Ston 

Registered Drus Store 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa, 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street. Selinsgrove, Pa, 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 

Tries to Rive the College Student* 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
in individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK TnAT 
OVER! 



Watsontown Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 



AND 



PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
Watsontown, Pa, FMlflllto Pm 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Crusader Line Stands Pat Against Buffalo 




Photo snapped as Heaton, Crusader right end, brought down a Buffalo 
fullback In opening game. 

n"„ j nM J l/«„Ciiw.nmlic ,(ILI ' K,iK MEN OVEK TWENTY- 

bonctand key Succumbs ONK YEARS TO RE(iISTER 
To Phi Mu Delta, 6-12 

On Monday evening mid the high 
flying passes and hard running ends 
with occasional peeps from the whistle 
of referee Bill Jansan or Glenn Schull- 
er Phi Mu Delta won a hard fought 
touch football game with its usual tall j ler's forte to crush enemies before they 
team. Bond and Key were by no means | know they are at war 



makes ihem hard customers to handle. 
Englishmen are proof of that. Let Hen- 
Hitler be informed that we mean bus- 
iness; that we are not France; and that 
when, in the interest of self-defense. 
Americans are forced to break their 
traditions, their enemies should think 
twice and count ten. Somebody should 
send Adolf Hitler a book about the Ar- 
gonne Forest. 



i Continued from Page 1) 
expected our immense reservoir of 
youthful energy to stand us in good 
.stead. We cannot do that any more. We 
cannot do it any more mainly because 
Hitler would not wait until we were 
ready to fight him. Rather it is Hit- 



a pushover team, as the score was only 
12 to 6. The Phi Mu's touchdowns 
were made on passes by Jones to Smith 
and Stiber to Smith, while Bond and 
Key's touchdown was made by Bant- 
ley's pass to Startzel in the end zone. 
Both teams played a hard fought game 
and the victory was well earned. 

Bond and Key's players were: George 
Bantley, George Herman, John Wolf. 
Allen Parcels, Jerry Startzel. and Clyde 
Sechler. Those playing for Phi Mu 
were: Fred Warner, Gus Kaufman, 
Jack Walsh, Jim Milford, John Jones, 
Eugene Smith, and Don Stiber. 
S 



SPEECH ASSOCIATION 
SELECTS DEBATE TOPIC 

(Continued from Page 1) 
their feet. I have never seen a success- | me nt and who felt that the World War 



Up to now we have, like Norway and 
some others, been a very unmilitary 
kind of people. Norway has paid for 
her mistake. We have depended upon 
the Atlantic and our immense reserve 
power to pull us out of trouble. We 
have been wont to say that democracies 
are expected to be slow in getting un- 
der way. The trouble with this atti- 
tude now is that in modern warfare 
months and even days count. If we 
should follow the example we set in 
1917 we could easily be a Nazi province 
within the time it took us to get going 
in the la.st war. A different kind of 
Minute-man is needed in 1940 from 
that required in 1775. 

Those of us who grew to manhood 
during the post-1918 days of disillusion- 



ful debater who has not been helped had been a failure in spite of the brave 
to a fuller view of the world and a bet- ! preachments of making the world safe 
ter chance of successs in his chosen i for democracy, cannot help but feel 
occupation." frustrated and bitter that now the 

The state debating topic, which Sus- American people must prepare for an- 
quehanna debaters will discuss this ! other war. It comes as a shock to all 
year is. Resolved: that a permanent; the ideals of peace we had that now we 
union of the United States and the I must, as a matter of dire necessity, ask 
British Commonwealth of Nations | the new generation of young men to 
should be immediately established. ' learn the arts of war. The good old 

The question was chosen by the de- j days of a volunteer army, of easy-go- 
bating coaches of the various state; ing attitudes towards defense, and of 
colleges in executive meeting Saturday ! looking upon the Atlantic as our Ma- 
afternoon. The delegates informally ! ginot Line are gone. We may look back 
agreed that the union should be of the I with nostalgia upon those times, but 
nature suggested by Clarence Streit in i the iron grip of circumstance requires 
his book "Union Now." i that sternly and soberly we prepare 

Professor Gilbert, Susquehanna Uni- 'or whatever slings and arrows Hitler 



1941— 

ill at any college or university 
which grants a degree in arts or 
science, to pursue a course of instruc- 
tion satisfactory completion of which 
is prescribed by such college or univer- 
sity as a prerequisite to either of sucli 
degrees; or (2) at any university de- 
scribed in paragraph (1), to pursue a 
course of instruction to the pursuit 
of Which a degree in arts or science is 
prescribed by such university as a pre- 
requisite ; 

and who, while pusuing such course of 
instruction at such college or univer- 
sity, is selected for training and ser- 
vice under this Act prior to the end of 
such academic year, or prior to July 
1, 1941, whichever occurs first, shall, 
upon his request, be deferred from in- 
duction into the land or naval forces 
for such training and service until the 
end of such academic year, but in no 
event later than July 1, 1941 " 

4. Sec. 5< 3 > Deferment is provided 
on the basis of dependents, physical. 
mental, or moral deficiency and for 
"those men whose employment in in- 
dustry, agriculture, or other occupa- 
tions or employment, or whose activity 
in other endeavors, is found to be nec- 
essary to the maintenance of the na- 
tional health, safety, or interest." 

5. Sec. 3(ai Any person between the 
ages of 18 and 3G shall be afforded an 
opportunity to volunteer for the period 
of training and service (12 months) 
prescribed in this Act. 

7. Sec. 5' d i "Ministers of religion, 
and students who are preparing for the 
ministry in theological or divinity 
schools . . . shall be exempt from 
training and service (but not from 
registration) under this Act." 

8. Sec. 5(g) Any person "who, by 



leason of religious training and belief, 
is conscientiously opposed to partici- 
pation in war in any form" is not re- 
quired, subject to approval of his claim, 
to be subject lo combatant service but 
is subject either to non-combatant ser- 
vice or to "work of national importance 
under civilian direction." 
Classification 

Each student 'as well as all other 
men 21 to 36) will be assigned a num- 
ber and will be subject to call for clas- 
sification. Prior to receipt of call he 
will receive a personal data sheet, one 
section Of which provides for record- 
in- the individual's education and in- 
cludes a specific question relating to 
attendance at school or college during 
the current academic year. If the 
student requests deferment and if his 
attendance during 1940 is verified by 
the college, his training may be de- 
ferred until July 1. 1941, or until the 
end of the academic year. Although a 
literal interpretation of the Act, as 
worded, might exclude some students 
from its deferment clause, there is 
reason to think that the Act will be 
liberally interpreted through rules and 
regulations now being drawn, to carry 
out a policy of deferring those students 
whose major occupation is the pursuit 
of a program of studies leading to a 
degree or certificate. Local boards will 
have discretion in deferring students in 
educational institutions or in courses 
of study not clearly within the Act 
(see par. 2 above), and part-time stu- 
dents, who may or may not be deferred 
because of their course of study, or 
other occupation. Authority for clas- 
| sifying am individual, subject to the 
! process of appeal, lies with the local 
board. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1940 

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 
YIELDS BEFORE ORANGE AND 



(Continued from Page 3) 

Summary and lineup: 
American Susquehanna 

Byham L. E Greco 

Fox L. T Martin 

Kelly L. G Campana 

Payne C TempHn 

Sharrah R. G. ... J. Matthews 

Jablonsky R. T Fletcher 

Schulze L. E Heaton 

Sprinkle Q. B Zuback 

Simpson L. H Isaacs 

Norford R. H Helm 

Garland F. B Wos 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

(HILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Fflh and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



George B. Rine FLORIST store wT-y 



versity's debating coach, has been ac- 
tive In the college debating organiza 



may have in store for us. Unwillingly 
and bitterly we must break with an- 



"" n me """T 7,3 " ' " „ otlicr old-time, much-revered Ameii 

K u „a„>e ,o aueri Saturday —■ 5J-**J ^^Jg&JZ 

in L_ ^ u * u „r;™ o* ■.win. peace time. (Perhaps the breaking of 

The debating stua on a Suscuie- P significant as 

hanna is fortunate, with all of last no-third-term 

year's men debatci * re turning to the B ut bombers, fifth column- 

T^lZ2ltt£2tt\'+ and the Nazi idea of living space 
inaicmi, mssrm nurvvr attention to old-time American 

l^wrence Cady, and Pier e Alle Coiy- fj c)are not be Norwegians 

ell. A special invitation is extended to 
freshmen who are interested in debat- 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa, 




ing to join the squad. Credit is offered 
to all upper-class debaters. 
Last year there were three teams: 



Sadly therefore, we observe ourselves 
passing into a new era — an era of 
third terms, universal conscription, 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



i*si year me e wcrr » ,« ^ , two-ocean navies and all the rest. But 
one woman's and ^^*f»^ theS e are to be preferred to the alter- 
former debated on he «'^ £ Qp 

The mens affirmative lebated Penn . si xty-five. or a three- 

not) we shall have to condition our- 
selves to new times and new methods. 
Nevertheless, let it be said for the 



land, Ursinus, Rutgers, and Muhlen- 
berg. 

The men's negative debated Ursinus, 
California State Teacher's College 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



First National Bank of Sclins Grove 
Welcome* Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



oamo.ma ow* *■ «-»"•;-» -J-j rmml thal vvc are doing these things 
Rutgers, and Muhlenberg at hone and 

« a tour to the wesern part of the ££« upon us. Let the gang of 

state they visited Penn State, Seton «T1«— „„„„., from the 



Hill, and Waynesburg. Over WKOK 
Sunbury, the Negative debated the 

question with Bucknell University. The 
question beinu: Resolved, that the 
basic blame for the present European 
conflict rests with the Allies." These 
debates were divided equally between 
the customary debating formula and 
the recently introduced Oregon type. 



Internationa] Ca pones know from the 
■tart that when free men are forced 
to dig in for their own defense and for 
their homes, they do so with a unity 
ol reeling and a determination that 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



"Ice-cold 
Coca-Coja"0 1 



|7Wfr* ft 




ROYAL Pertaek typewriters 

STATIONERY SUPPLIES 

JOS. S. MENTZ 

Ml Market Square 
Sunbury, Penna. 



Sunbury (oca Cola 
Bottling Works 

SI NBIKY 
B. P. O. Edwards, Manager 



See 

MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

( 'ome to Life at 

LIEBS 

•For Things That Are Different" 
SI \Bl!RY, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For Information addrww: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS* 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SelinsgTove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 

courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

: RE-MEDICAL. PRE-DENTAL. PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



SUSQ'W" * 



PA. 



- 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



Mock election Tuesday evening 

An election campaign with all the 
pomp and ceremony will be enacted by 
the Business Society tonight in the 
chapel beginning at 6:45 p. m. Fred 
Warner will represent Roosevelt, the 
politician; Eugene Smith will enact 
Willkie, the politician. The public is 
invited. 

Debate meeting Thursday 

The initial meting of the debate as- 
sociation will be held in 301 G. A., 
Thursday afternoon at 4 p, m. All 
freshmen and transfers interested in 
joining the squad should be present at 
this meeting. 

S. C. A. meeting Thursday 

A combined meeting of the men's 
and women's Student Christian Asso- 
ciation will be held in Seibert Social 
Rooms on Thursday evening at 9:45 
p. m. The topic, to be discussed by a 
student leader, will be: "A Wholesome 
Student Opinion on Our Campus." 

Crusaders Face Juniata Indians 

Two undefeated teams will face each 
other Saturday afternoon when the In- 
dians play host to the Crusader eleven 
on Varsity Field. The kickoft is sched- 
uled for 2 p. m. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Volume XXXXVII. 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 

SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1040 



Number ,0 



Dean Gait Improves 
Advisory Techniques 



Fifty Eligible Men 
Answer Draft Call 



ROTH STRING QUARTET STAR COURSE ATTRACTION 

WffW 



Advisors to Make Budgets for Three 
Types of Delinquent Students in Bet- 
ter Study- Habit Movement 



Special Board of Registration to 
Question Eligible Susquehannans 
From 9 to 12 Tomorrow 



Students to migrate to Juniata 

A student migration to the Juniata 
game has been planned. The Crusader 
band will travel to the game, and a | 
bus will be on hand to furnish trans- 
portation for students provided suffi- 



Dean Gait has further improved the 
faculty advisory system which has been 
in effect for the assistance of those 
students who have trouble in adjust- 
ing themselves to the scholastic re- 
quirements of college. 

It is said that this is to be the most 
comprehensive and efficient method 
Which has been enforced to date. There 
are three groups of students which will 
be under the supervision of advisors; 
they are: those on probation, those on 
extended probation, and those fresh- 
men who scored very low in all three 
placement tests. 

The advisors will hold three meet- 
ings this semester with these students 
at which times they will help them to 
budget their time and help them ac- 
quire better study habits according to 
the suggestions set forth in the Stu- 
dents' Handbook. In connection with 
this, the students will be given daily 
time sheets which they will be required 
to hand in to their advisors. 

This system lias been devised in or- 



cient interest is shown. The eleven! der tnat students may make the schol- 



o'clock class will not meet on Saturday. 

Inter-fraternity ball Saturday evening 

Fraternity men and their guests will 
open the dance program of the year at 
the Inter-fraternity ball Saturday 
evening from 8 to 12. Music will be 
furnished by Art Wendell. 

Mid-semester exams begin 

A two-week examination period to 
determine students' mid - semester 
standing will begin Monday. 



astic grade and it remains for the in 
dividual student to determine whether 
he is going to cooperate to his fullest 
with the faculty. 



Carnegie Foundation 
Donates Periodicals 



Fifty eligible male students of Sus- ; 
quehanna will answer their country's ; 
summons to register for the Selective 
Service Act tomorrow. October 16, be- ' 
tween 9 and 12 a. m. 

The registration will take place in 
room 109. G. A., the small room ad- I 
joining the main room used by the 
University band. The Snyder County 
Commissioners have appointed Mr. E. 
T. Yorty, Rev. Dallas C. Baer. and Mr. 
Marion S. Schoch to serve as the com- 
mlttee for the registration at the uni- | 
versity. College men are advised to 
register between the hours of 9 and 12 
a. m. They will be excused from classes 
during the time necessary to fill out i 
the required forms, provided they have ' 
no vacant period and provided they 
explain to the professor the reason for ; 
their tardiness. 

Registration in this federal program 
for national defense is positively re- 
quired of all male students who will 
have reached their twenty-first birth- 
day on or before the date of registra- 
tion. This includes day students as well 
as resident men. 

The committee urges that none of 
the approximately fifty eligible men will 
attempt to evade the demands made 
upon them by their government. A 
thorough check-up will be made from 
the home urea of each student. 




ROTH QUARTET WINS WIDE ACCLAIM 
OF MUSIC-LOVERS IN STAR COURSE 



Renditions of Difficult Selections by Noted 
String Quartet Receive Unusual Commenda- 
tion in Audience Response 






Debate Coach Issues 
Call to First Meeting 

Susquehanna debaters will hold their 
initial meeting this Thursday after- 
noon at four in G. A. 301. 



~<3> 



The Susquehanna University Star 
Course opened its 1940-1941 season last 
evening with a concert by the noted 
Roth String Quartet. The recital was 
at 8:15 p. m. in Seibert Chapel. 

The ceiling lights in the front of the 



Editor of Times Speaks 
To Susquehanna Staff 



Eleven years ago the Trustees of the 
Carnegie Corporation set up a supervi- 



sory board to studv the needs of cer- 



S. C. A. Membership Drive 

Trip Student Christian Association 
is asking for members for the coming laln coll ^ e 110 ™ rlp s and to t»ue grams 
year. The membership fee is one dollar in aid t0 these libraries, the use of said 
in return for which the member gets funds t0 accomplish the wider pur- 
a membership card bearing his name. P° ses of developing careful and 
The money realized from membership* thoughtful concentration on the col- 
is used for such purposes as bringing 5 {^ "j™?. -.«" . fa*^. j** 1 ?" * 
speakers to the campus, sponsoring S 



C. A. parties and outings, etc. 
S 



Dr. Paul Ovrebo Speaks 
To S. C. A. on Sharing 



the educational work of the college 
itself. This plan was an impetus to 
stimulate the growth of college librar- 
ies by giving them books which, under 
ordinary circumstances, they could not 
afford. 

In the course of its existence, the j 
A meeting of the Student Christian ' Carnegie Foundation has turned its en- 
Association was held in the social deavors to filling in other college gaps j 
rooms of Seibert Hall last Thursday ' sucn «" original manuscripts, docu- 
evenlng. The meeting was conducted by; ments. maps, classical recordings, rare 
Emogean Pensyl who opened the meet- j books - collections, and periodicals, 
ing with the poem entitled, "The Psalm j W e are happy to inform the student j 
of Life." bodv that Susquehanna University Li- 

Dr. Paul Ovrebo spoke to the group brary. according to a letter from Dr. | 
on the subject of "Sharing Our Lives Robert M. Lester, secretary of the Car- 
with Others." He said that our sor- m . gie corporation, is the recipient of 
rows should be shared with others. We three-year subscriptions to a selected 
should share with those who under- i ist 0I periodicals, the same being gifts 
tand us and who can help us and be Irom this distinguished educational 
of some benefit to us. He also said that foundation. 

our joys as well as our sorrows should Thpsp pt , riodicals whic h have been 
be shared with other people. Dr. Ovre- d (m lh( , pt . riodical rack are: 

bo brought out the fact that sharing .. Americail Schol(U , .. .. Journal f Adult 
is one of the most important reasons Education •• .. Fore ign Affairs," "Poet- 
why we should go to church and wor- „ .. Soulh AUantlc Quarterlv ■■ and 



ship God with others. He said that wo 



"The Journal of Higher Education. 



derive more benefit from our worship if 
we are able to share our feeling with We hope that the students of Sus- 
others. quehanna University will take advant- 
Janet Shockey was the pianist for age of this philanthropic addition to 
the meeting. Announcements were our library and enjoy the benefits to 
made concerning the meetings that will be gained therefrom by reading these 
be held in the near future by the group. I periodicals 
<«>. 

Men's Student Council Initiates 
Homecoming Decorations Plan 



"Some insights into the problem of 
newspaper production" were presented 
at the weekly meeting of the journal- 
ism class by Marion S. Schoch. editor 
and publisher of THE SELINSGROVE 
TIMES and printer of THE SUSSUE- 
HANNA 

Mechanical excellence was the first 
necessity of a good newspaper set forth 
by the speaker. The type arrangement 
must be in order and symmetrical. It 
is abo essential that the ink does not 
blot. In the future Mr. Schoch will have 
The Susquehanna printed on a book 
press which has a spray attachment 
to oxidize ink without smudge. 

The necessity of having a schedule 
and obeying it was emphasized. Meet- 
ing the deadline is essential. Large 
papers sell advertisements with a 
guarantee that certain hours of deliv- 
ery will be kept. 

Considerable attention was given to 
style. Sentence structure and word or- 
der must be carefully checked. The 
first paragraph must tell the entire 
stcry in a few words. The headline 
should have a verb in the upper deck 
and the second line should never be 
longer than the first. 

A few suggestions for the improve- 
ment of THE SUSQUEHANNA were 
made. More names should get into our 
columns. Reference was made to a gos- 
sip column but the speaker pointed out 
that his experience has shown him that 
little is ever gained by them. The addi- 
tion of an alumni column will probably 
help to create more alumni interest in 
it. 

Mr. Schoch expressed the hope that 
with a few improvements The Susque- 
hanna might in the Rear future win 
one of the Intercollegiate Ne ws pap e r 
Ass ocia tion contests. He pledged his ut- 
most support to thus end. 



All students who have an interest in ' auditorium were not lighted, but the 

the techniques of debate and who wish artlsts were seated about a single lamp 

to trv out for Susquehanna's varsity on the sta B e - Man >" members of the 

teams are invited to attend this meet- audience commented very favorably 

ing. It is most important that fresh- u P° n thls arrangement, the concensus 

men who think that they might later bein S that u added that air of ei B n - 

participate in this worth-while acti- teenth cer »tury elegance which is gen- 

vitv should enroll sarly in their college erall >' thought of in connection with 

care, preferably ft* week. In order '" st rine Quartet. 



that they may now begin to reap the 
profits of experience. 

According to the last issue of THE 
SUSQUEHANNA it was stated that the 
teams would discuss the state topic 
which is, "Resolved: that a permanent 
union of the United States and the 
British Commonwealth of Nations 
should be immediately established." 
Prof. Russell Gilbert, debate coach, 
makes the comment that perhaps the 
teams will consider the national debate 
topic which deals with the defense of 
the Western Hemisphere rather than 
the aforementioned subject. 
S 

Susquehanna Alumni 
Succeed at Coaching 



As the launching of Susquehanna's 
fiftietli gridiron campaign turns stu- 
dent interest toward sports, let us re- 
view the football heroes of a few sea- 
sons ago who are now coaching foot- 
ball. 

Harry Sweeney, '23 who heroically 
WOO a 105 yard touchdown against 
Colgate, is now pushing his West Vir- 
ginian team to similar victories. 

Central Pennsylvania, where some i country under the title of "The Isle of 
of the best scholastic football in the May." This was probably the most 
state is being played, has its share of familiar piece on the program, and 
Susquehanna alumni as coaches. At consequently, the most popular with 



The program follows: 

1. Mozart . . . String Quartet in D 

major, No. 18 

Allegretto Adagio 

Minuetto Allegro 

2. Schumann . . . String Quartet in A 

minor, Op. 41 No. 1 

Introduzione-Allegro Adagio 

Scherzo Presto 

3. a. Tschaikowsky . . . Andante Can- 

tabile 

b. Szanto . . . Parisian Valse 

c. Boecherino . . . Rondo 
Concerning the individual numbers, 

the third, or Adagio, movement of the 
Mozart quartet was particularly fine, 
although the whole thing was typical- 
ly Mozart and therefore very good. 

The Scherzo of the Schumann num- 
ber undoubtedly rates four stars. The 
brilliancy of execution was unparal- 
leled: something unequalled in many 
a year of Star Courses. The same skill 
was also shown in the Presto move- 
ment of the same number. 

The Roth Quartet played the "An- 
dante Cantabile" so beautifully that 
one could almost forget that it lias 
been hacked to an ignoble death by 
all the fourth rate dance bands in the 



s 



The Men's Student Council is con- 1 
templating some changes in Home- 
coming festal decorations. Roughly, the I 
idea Is thusly: Instead of, as last year, 
allowing the individual students to ex- 
press his own individual whims, often 
resulting in bad publicity for the col- 
lege in general, and the students in 
particular, this year things will be dif- 
ferent. Decorations will be orderly. 

Each dormitory — and that includes 
Hassinger, Selinsgrove, Seibert, and the 
Cottage Annex— and the three trater- 

Thnity houses will decorate The stu- 
dents in each housing unit will band 
together, vieing against the other units 
for the best decorations. 

Joe Greco, who thought up the idea, 
suggests signs be made by painting bed- 
sheets and hanging them out windows 
< "Dear Mom, Please send me another 



bedshoet. I know this is only my first 
year at Susquehanna, but you'd be sur- 
prised bOW fast the sheets wear out. 
My rconnnatc's are done for, too.") 
And, of course, bunting can be gotten. 

Homecoming day itself, a group of 
judges «the Men's Council hope they ; 
can prevail on President Smith, Dean; 
Gait, and Dean Jensen in the interests 
ol non -prejudice — to serve) will care-l 
fully examine each decorated building' 

and declare that is the winner. 

i Fill in the blank yourself.) 

As pet, the plans are in a nebulous i 
and now being cautiously pushed 
( ward the Women's Student Council. 
If the girls think well of the idea, a ; 
new order will prevail in campus de- 
corations come Homecoming. 

And a good time will be had by ail- 
but "orderlily." 



Houtz Addresses First 
Biemic Society Meeting 

October's meeting ol the Biemic So- 
ciety wa.s held Tuesday evening in 
Steele Science Hall at :30 with the 
president, Jo-' Pasterchik, presiding. 

A hike to Mt. Mahanoy was planned 
tor Saturday afternoon. October 26. 
They plan to leave about 12:45. 

The next meeting of the society will 
be m the form of a joint meeting with 
Pi Gamma Mu at which time a man 
who was associated personally with the 
late Thomas A. Edison will be the 
speaker. 

The meeting was then turned over to 
Dr. Houtz, who spoke very interestingly 
on the chemistry of modern warfare 



Sunbury there is John Auten, '28, and 
his assistant there la Al Garman, '31. 

Just across the Susquehanna River, 
John Banna, '35, and Ruaa Eisenhower, 
'35, great stalwarts of the 1932 unde- 
feated Crusaders, are passing their 
success on to their players at Nor- 
thumberland 

John Meyers, '33. fleet-footed half- 
back in 1932. has shifted his football 
supervision from Cooper Township to 
Bhamokin; and Herb Spiuelmyer. '32, 
has transferred from Sandy Township 
High School to Mercer. 

Ted Kenunerer, '28, Ray Scott, '31, 
Tom Raymer, '22, Steve Martinec, '35, 
Willis Pratt. '28, Jack Maguire, '35, 
Vince Walsh, '35, Ray Riclen, '20, and 
Russ Carmichael, '34. have all been 
turning out "winners" with amazing 
success at such high schools as State 
College, Ashland. Harrisburg. Lewis- 
town, Newport, and Johnstown. 

Harry Swope, '37, and Pete Shuty, 
'37, co-captains a few yean ago, are 
producing stars at Neville Island. Herb 
Snell, '33, who was assistant to Bill 
Ullery in producing t he first and only 
undefeated eleven at Susquehanna, has 
(Continued on Page 4i 



the majority of the audience 

The sprightly "Parisian Valse" and 
the "Rondo" were quite will received, 
Mr. Roth doing a line piece of solo 
work in the latter. 

The personnel: Peri Roth, violin; 
Ha< hmael Winstock. violin; Julius 
BhaUer, Viola; and Oliver Edel, 'cello. 
The Ruth String Quartet was an un- 
doubted success in fact, one non- 
constervatory student was heard to say, 
"These boys are really good, aren't 
they?"— some of the highest praise 
possible from an undergraduate, 
s 



I 



THANKSGIVING VACATION 

Thanksgiving vacation will ex- 
tend from noon on Wednesday, No- 
vember 27, to 1 p. m. on Monday, 
December 2. This vacation period 
is final and cancels all previous an- 
nouncements concerning it, in- 
cluding those in the handbook and 
the bulletin. Thanksgiving at Sus- 
quehanna will be observed the last 
Thursday in the month in accord- 
ance with the Pennsylvania ruling. 






PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1940 



THE SUSQUE HANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 



Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heeiner, '42, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 



Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising 
College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 



Service, Inc. 
York, N. Y, 



MAY WE . . 
. . SUGGEST 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
Rhythm on the River 

We've been waiting for a good mu- 
sical for some time, and this looks like 
the one. Bing Crosby is at his best (do 
you remember Mississippi?). Mary 
Mar is the very lovely love interest 
and the whole thing is ably supported 
by Basil Rathbone and Oscar (Infor- 
mation Please) Levant. The story has 
Crosby and Miss Martin as ghost song 
writers, and while it isn't the most 
original it provides a nice vehicle for 
a half-dozen songs that will go over 
big and for some clever comedy rout- 
ine. 

FRIDAY AND SATURADY 
Boom Town 

Here is one of the neatest little jobs 
since G. W. T. W. Clark Gable and 
Spencer Tracy are a couple of un- 
scrupulous oil operators who are both 
in love with Claudette Colbert. The 
boys get into all sorts of trouble with 
wildcat oil wells, the federal govern- 
ment, and Hedy Lamar. Comes thril- 
ling climax after climax with Tracy 
first trying to break Gable and then 
saving him from jail, Gable first run- 
nin goff with Tracy's girl and then on 
the make for La Hedy. The whole 
works is liberally seasoned with he- 
man action and plenty of fisticuffs. 

The local management has raised 
the tariff a nickel on this picture. This 
is less than the twenty-five per cent 
boost that most of the big houses have 
given the show. You will no doubt see 
more of this policy in the future, es- 
pecially since the industry is tending 
toward longer features. (B. T. runs 120 
~ " minutes.) If the pictures are really bet- 

Oh! for the good old days. Where drop three (I hope eyelet sweaters will ter than we've been getting, this col- 
The tradition has been built Up that during have they gone? Listen, my dears, and be instyle because they are a lot easier umn won't kick. 



THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor R uth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle 
Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell. '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella Fetheroff, 43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjorie Wolfe. '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, 
'41- Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine 
Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, 
'43; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer. '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane 
Shotts, '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heef ner 

Fred Warner 
Advertising Managers j Chester Shusta 

| Frank Corcoran 
] Dorothy Webber 
Prof. D. I. Reitz. 



Assistants 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1940 



FUN FOR ALL 

The front page of this issue carries an article telling of 
the new order in Homecoming Day decorations which the Men's 
Student Council is initiating this year. We feel that every stu- 
dent should analyse fully the issues involved before making a 
stand for or against this innovation. 

Consider with us, if you will, the conditions as they have 
been heretofore 

the night before Homecoming Day all freshmen enjoy immun 
ity from law and order 









you shall hear. 
What has happened to the calm se- 
Any freshman Who on this night does renity of dear old S. U.? Girls, what 
. , . . . , ., , i , • will we do? We will be in Cobina and 

not "decorate his trees," "paint his sidewalks, and carry his Brenda>s class with no men . . Tis a 
siens" is not representative of the true spirit of a Susquehanna pity! 

b r See how iiuiocent that Freshman 

This understanding passes each year from upper- look5 Little does he appreciate his 

skull cap with the cute little button 
on the end. Pretty soon he'll have a 



to make.) 

Girls, how do you like your men?— 
with brass buttons on the front or 
just the "Joe College" type with his 
trouser cuffs rolled up? Confidentially, 
boys, "There's Something about a 
Soldier"— it gets 'em every time. Must 
be the uniform. 



MONDAY 
Sailor's Lady 

You've seen pictures like this before: 
a sailor, a girl, a little brat, and the 
United States navy. Jon Hall plays the 
part of a happy-go-lucky sailor boy 



engaged to Nancy Kelly. The boys 
The boy on the right stands there so from Jon , s sm t every trick in the 

determinedly, sure of himself, and to- books t0 keep their pal from tne ties 



freshman 

classmen to freshmen 

Upon the spirit Of this procedure we congratulate any Class stra p under his chin and that will be patient as to the activity around him. ^matrimony and are 
that pvpv riPPnrarprl While it does embarrass our alumni friends a lot worse - ° ur y° un S men must tearn Chee! See how envious the Freshman u th appearance of -skipper," a 

tnatevei decoiated. wnne it does emoanass out aiumm inenut. ^ thafc they haw greater responsi . looks (litft tnat Just n k e a frosh, all cute httle orphan The funr £ est se _ 

a little to see the campus Of their Alma Mater in SUCh a Con- bilities than just trying to sneak their hero worship?) quence of the film concerns the night 

Hit . cH11 M oivp „ thprn thp f P eii n cr that thev are welcome S "'Is in by the fire escape. No kidding though, all jokes aside- maneuvers of the naval war games 

dltion, Stl gives ,nem The boys are registering a nd will be we're proud of our young men here at when . mipper very nearly makes the 

ready for their country's call.^What will S. U., and^if^they had^to leave us.jve'd boys pkk up theh . toys and g0 nome 

Prior to the war games the usual sailor 



become of S. U.? Ah. hah! I know. It miss them terribly, but we'd promise 

will turn into a girls' school where they to write, honestly. Just think, your 

can run aro'ind just as they please, mailbox never would be empty. One 

curlers and all. Oh, Happy Day! But thing, the girls would get a lot of ex- 

we can't just sit idly by— oh, no. I have ercise trying to keep up the football 

a plan, girls, listen— we'll start a knit- team, basketball team and also batting 

ting club, you know, pearl one and a home run. Can't you just see them? 



This feeling we must preserve and expand. 

The method of achieving this end in the past has led to 
considerable property damage and much unnecessary labor on 
the part of the campus workmen. In fact the point has been 
reached where it is necessary to alter the method used in ex- 
pressing our welcome to the grads. 

The issue then becomes: "What shall we put in the place of 
this impractical procedure?" The Student Council, following 
the example of the more progressive colleges, has adopted the 
idea of competitive decorating. We believe that this system 
covers the advantages without the disadvantages of the for- The story of Archibald Buckingham 

, Grimes 

mer system. Is one tnat carino t be told too many 

It will no doubt be possible for some freshman, if he is so times, 
minded, to go against the council ruling and revert to the "old- 
school" practices, but those who do so will merely display their 

lack Of cooperation with a body interested in building a better As a freshman he tried to be nice to Studies and books were his chief dis- 



antics on shore are indulged in and 
you might find the whole thing rather 
amusing, my dear. 

S 



"CASE HISTORIES" 



KEYHOLE SLANTS 
. . ON KEY BOOKS 



A model student for dear old S. U., 
He did all the things a good student 
should do. 



II 
Joe Jones was a different sort of a lad, 
Where Archie was good, this guy would 

be bad. 
He had no respect for the profs or the 

proctors ; 
And looked askance at the dear old 

doctors. 



Susquehanna. By cooperating we have nothing to lose and a 
lot to gain; by refusing to cooperate we may make necessary 
further curtailment of our liberties. 

S 



the sophs; 
And worked like a dog for his various 

profs; 
He followed the straight and narrow 

path; 
He never would copy his roommate's 

math ; 
He prepared all his lessons a week in 

advance; 
(I don't think he ever was seen at a 

dance ; ) 
He would study assignments far into 

the night, 



likes; 

He spent his evenings down at Reich's; 
He studied infrequently if at all; 



Early in the spring last year, S. U. 
Library joined the Book-of-the-Month 
Club. America, as anybody knows, has 
grown so fast that it is impossible for 
anyone, even librarians, professors, and 
bookdealers constantly in touch with 
books, to know even a fraction of the 
new titles which appear— at the as- 
tonishing rate of several hundred 
thousand a year with well over a mil- 
lion books printed every single year. 



FEWER CLASSROOM TANGENTS 

Now that we seniors are in the process of learning how to 
teach, we have become more observant of the methods used 
in our classrooms by our own collge professors. Our observa- 
tions reveal that there is room for improvement in technique 

even within our own faculty ranks, and we feel it our duty to And the next day in class there'd be no 
point out such weaknesses in order that they may be alleviated one as bright 

, As Archie, the scholar— and as his re- 

or removed. ward 

In techniques of teaching class we were taught always to His shC epskin diploma read: Magna 

have a distinct lesson plan and to follow that plan closely; yet, cum Laude. 

in college we have come in contact with many professors who An ^ la t ^ rn ^ a s n ■™*J h€ profs ' and his 

are prone to diverge from the lesson even for whole periods. That Archibald Buckingham Grimes 

Irrespective of the value of the issue being discussed, be it fra- would succeed. 

ternity politics or the European war, this procedure cannot be As a mUm Qf fact he didn , t do bad 

justified to any large extent. Today there is a great volume of H e got a nice job— with the help of his 

material to be covered in the average college course; more than dad. 

And a charming young lady became 

his wife; 
And he lived with her happily all of 

his life. 



But was seen rather often at Seibert Thus the general public can have little 
jj a ll- opportunity to know the current au- 

TT ,", »._■_.. __ ,. .._.—. thors' work. In the days of Hawthorne, 

He seldom retired any time before .. . _ . ._ •! 

^ .- Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) and 

three; 

And his marks as a rule were not quitf 

"C"; 
He slept thru Bible and History of Ed. 



Emerson there were authors writing, 
in number only about one per cent of 
the number who write today. Con- 
sequently the public intime could 



As though he were peacefully home and scan all their work and good authors 

in bed; 
But he generally managed to get thru 

a test 
With a line of Bull and a healthy 

guess. 
And when it came time to graduate 



gradually gained recognition and fame, 
but today all is different. Standard 
authors can struggle for years, turning 
out real literature, and "be born 
to blush unseen, and waste their sweet- 
ness on the desert air." In fact, be- 



Our Joe was there-but I must relate cause so man y auth ° rs did J ust this ' 



Social Committee to Meet 
Tonight; Makes Dance Plans 



can be covered thoroughly at the best. Every minute of diver- 
sion means material not covered. 

This trend among college professors is probably due to the 
fact that the professor covers the material year after year un- 
til he fails to realize that the student may be having difficulty 
in understanding the facts. Then too, many college teachers 
have been in the field so long that they must be very alert if 
they are to keep abreast with modern progress in the profession. the social com [ttee has 

Regardless of cause we feel that a weakness does exist and been appointed. The initial meeting will 
we shall welcome any improvement* which will lead to a higher JJ-J £ ^0"™^ 



That the dean remarked in sepulchral 

tones: 
'You'll see what becomes of Joseph 

Jones." 

As a matter of fact, he didn't do bad. 
He got a nice job— with the help of his 

dad. 
And a charming young lady became his 

wifo ; 
And he lived with her happily the rest 

of his life. 



Plans for the first dance of the year 
will soon get under way now that the 



standard of instruction in our university. 



the organization. Other members in- 



clude Dean Gait, Miss Jensen, Mr. Os- 
terbind, Dr. Sheldon, and Dr. Wilson. 

One of the first duties of the com- 
mittee will be the preparation for the 
forthcoming inter - fraternity dance. 
This event is scheduled for November 
19, in the gymnasium. 

The committee controls social affairs 
of the campus; plans for dances and 
all group activities should be submitted 
to it. 



and starved by way of reward, a clever 
bookdealer decided that he could ac- 
complish two ends by one means, and 
invented the Book-of-the-Month Club. 
This organization is really only a book 
selling agency, in the business for pro- 
fit like any other, but It accomplishes 
one very special objective: it solves for 
literally thousands of people the very 
difficult problem of selecting from all 
the welter of new books and authors 
that appear on the market every 
year, twelve books having sufficient 
popular appeal and literary worth 
to merit our time and money in buy- 
ing and reading. It selects from 
the thousands of struggling authors 
those whose work is worthy and cata- 
pults them into national prominence 
whereas otherwise their work would 
frequently pass unnoticed. The se- 
lections of the "Book for the Month" 
are made by a distinguished panel of 
(Continued on Page 4) 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 






THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<s> — 



-<e>- 



-<s>- 



STAGGMEN BREAK SWARTHMORE'S 12 
GAME WINNING STREAK BY 70 COUNT 



Crusaders to Tangle 
With Juniata Eleven 



Zeravica Plunges Over Garnet Goal for Only 
Score; Crusader Line Stands Pat; Helm Shines 
In Running Plays 



A hard-hitting Orange and Haroon$> 
eleven abruptly ended the Swarthmore 
College string of 12 straight games with 
defeat by winning, 7-0, on the Garnet 
grid last Saturday. 

Coach Stagg's fast moving backs 
proved too much for Lew Elverson's 
outfit as they kept the ball in Swarth- 
more territory most of the afternoon. 
Two thousand fans crowded the 
bleachers under ideal weather condi- 
tions to watch the Crusaders push over 
a touchdown in the second period, the 
lone score of the game. 

The chief injury of the day came to 
Larry Isaacs, fleet-footed back, who 
sprained his right ankle during the 
fourth quarter. 
First Quarter 

Swarthmore kicked-off as the game 
opened. The Crusaders were forced to 
kick after four unsuccessful attempts 
to crash the line. The punting duel 
continued when the Garnets kicked 
back to Zeravica who squeezed down 
the stripes for a 22-yard gain. Still 
holding tight, the Orange and Maroon 
were forced to kick and in this play 
put the Philadelphia eleven in their 
coffin corner — their own one yard line, 
as the quarter ended. 
Second Quarter 

With Susquehanna using their su- 
perior poundage to advantage, Swarth- 
more tried running plays with Fred 
Reed and Lin Wolfe carrying the ball, 
they bucked up against a stone wall 
and were forced to kick to their 35- 
yard line. Here Helm and Zeravica be- 
gan a march down the field. Helm hit 
off tackle for seven and Zeravica pick- 
ed up a first on the 20. Helm got nine 
more in two tries, and Zeravica on a 
reverse, went to the eight. Helm hit 
thru for two more and Zeravica went 
off short side six yards for a touch- 
down. Heaton slammed the ball over 
the bar for the extra point. Finding it 
difficult to make any yardage, after 
the kick-off, the Garnets took to the 
air only to have Larry Isaacs intercept 
a pass on his 17-yard line. A series of 
line plays brought the pig-skin up to 
Swarthmore's 45-yard line where the 
visiting team was forced to kick. The 
Garnets advanced to their 44 as the 
quarter ended. 
Third Quarter 

With defeat staring them in the eyes, 
the Quaker City eleven stacked up an 
air-tight defense and as a result both 
teams held to the last inch. Punts were 
exchanged up to the latter part of the 
period when Zeravica flung a pass that 
was intercepted by Trudle to squelch 
another scoring threat for the home 
team. The Garnets kicked when they 
couldn't get solid footing but received 
the ball again when Heaton was forced 
to kick from their 45 yard stripe to 
end the quarter. 
Fourth Quarter 

Late in the fourth quarter, Elverson's 
lighter ball club tore off four first 
downs in a row to reach the Crusader 
23, where a fumble by Fred Reed was 
recovered by Tackle Sam Fletcher. The 



Makes Only Score 

m 



w 




STEVE ZERAVICA 
Fullback 



Sw 



Johnson; guards, Cryer and Jones; 
center, Trudel; backs, Hamnum, Taurt- 
man, and Alders. 

Officials: referee, G. F. Erb (Ursin- 
us); umpire, C. A. Way (Penn State); 
linesman, F. L. Gilber (Williamsport). 
Statistical Summary 

S.U 

First downs 11 

First down by passes 1 

First downs by rushing 10 

Yards gained by rushing . . . 224 

Yards lost 12 

Yards gained by passing ... 39 
Forward passes attempted . . 8 

Completed 2 

Incompleted 5 

Intercepted 1 

Number of punts 7 

Average of punts 37 

Ave. runback 17 

Average kickofTs 50 

Ave. runback 10 

Fumbles 

Lost fumbles 

Yard lost, penalties 30 



With three victories to their credit, 
Susquohanna's Crusaders look forward 
to a rip-roaring battle with Juniata at 
the latter's field this Saturday. This 
will be the first time since 1931 that 
the Orange and Maroon have played 
at Huntingdon. 

Years of rivalry add spice to the 
coming tilt. Since 1923, the two teams 
have fought for supremacy in football, 
basketball, baseball and track and this 
year is no exception. The fact that both 
teams are undefeated, to date, adds 
further interest to the tussle. Back in 
1932, the situation was much the same, 
with Juniata traveling to Selinsgrove, 
sure of victory, and going home on the 
wrong end of a 12-7 score. 

A large crowd is expected to be on 
hand as it is Homecoming Day on their 
campus. However, the fans will not be 
made up entirely of Juniata support- 
ers. A large group of Susquehanna 
alumni expect to be present and at 
last hearings, our student body is plan- 
ning to move up "en masse." Governor 
James and his party, who will be pre- 
sent to dedicate a new building, are al- 
so expected to be in attendance, adding 
noteworthy celebrities to the crowd. 

In looking over the siuation as far as 
the team is concerned, one gloomy note 
is to be heard. Larry Isaacs, sparkplug 
| of the Crusaders' backfield, received an 
ankle injury in the Swarthmore fray 
whicch will keep him on the sidelines 
for a couple of weeks. However, the 
rest of the boys are in fine shape and 
should be in the pink for the game. 

Incidentally, of three of our other 
future opponents, Moravian won and 
Allegheny and Hartwick were defeated 
this week-end. C. C. N. Y. was not 
scheduled. 



Freshmen Win Touch 
Fray with Beta Kappas 

Wednesday afternoon, October 9, the 
freshmen were certainly in there plug- 
ging during their touch football game 
with Beta Kappa. It would not be easy 
to pick out any individual star as the 
entire freshman team did very well. 
Their swift running and spectacular 
passing seemed to completely outclass 
the hard fighting fraternity team. The 
freshman team made three touchdowns 
in the first half and two the second, 
thus making trie score 30-0. 




w®> 



-',' - i' s; ; *<*V*m '«, • V,' * 



JOHN ZUBACK 
Quarterback 



John Zuback Named for 
Berth on Jack Benny's 
All-American Team 



The players for the freshman team 
passing of Wolfe and the running of! were: Earny Boden, Ralph Brown, Bill 
Trautman featured this late uprising. Jansan, Dave Lohman, Charles Ague, 
After Heaton kicked, the Garnets took Jim Clark, Dick Moglia, Glenn Scheul- 
to the air in a desperate drive for a er, and Ray Eskels. 



score. Meyers bagged a pass to end 
their drive and the game. 

Susquehanna piled up 12 first downs 
to seven for the opposition, but the 
difference between the two teams was 
much wider than this would indicate. 

For the Orange and Maroon, Zera- 
vica, Isaacs and Helm were the big 
noise, with Martin, Heaton and Temp- 
lin excelling on the forward wall. 

Lineup and summary: 

Susquehanna Swarthmore 

Greco L. E Ramsey 

R. Matthews ... L. T Donnelly 

Campana L. G Carr 

Templin C Wright 

J.Matthews ... R. G Miller 

Fletcher R. T Ganister 

Heaton R. E Dugan 

Zuback Q. B Reed 

Isaacs L. H Richards 

Helm R. H Wolfe 

Zeravica F. B DeGutis 

Susquehanna 7 0—7 

Swarthmore 0—0 

Touchdown: Zeravica. 

Point after touchdown: Heaton 
( placement). 

Substitutions : Susquehanna — guards, 
Blough and Hall; tackle, Richards; 
backs, Lyons, Meyers, and Wos; 
Swarthmore — ends, Bowditch and 



The Beta Kappa players were: Mar- 
tin Hopkins, Merle Hoover, Don Ba- 
shore, Harry Wilcox, Glen Musser, and 
Ken Klinger. 

S 

Janice Crawford to Lead 
Freshman Hockey Eleven 



Janice Crawford succeeded in pass- 
ing the Freshman hockey test and has 
been chosen as the Freshman hockey 
captain. The other girls who took the 
test were Nadia Zaremba, Ellen Rus- 
sel, Grace Lefler, and Dorothy Wanser. 

Girls' Varsity Hockey practice has 
been going as usual and Miss Shure 
has been making several changes in 
the line-ups at practice. No definite 
team has been chosen as yet and prob- 
ably won't be until shortly before the 
Hockey Play Day which is scheduled 
for the first week-end in November. 



John Zuback, stellar Crusader back, 
received national distinction last week 
when he was named to a post on Jack 
Benny's All-American grid team. 

To mix up the expert sports writers 
and judges of All-American teams, 
stars of the movie kingdom try to as- 
semble what they think might be the 
"eleven." 

Not to be outdone, Jack Benny (alias 
Buck Benny) submitted his list for 
publicity last week, of the football men 
whose last names begin with "Z," and 
who he thinks will be the potential 
material for high honors on the grid- 
iron this season. 

John Zuback, Benny's pick for the 
backfield, made the quarterback berth 
Not only does this add to John's laurels, 
but it places Susquehanna's Orange 
and Maroon on the map. 

The lineup follows: Ends, Zammar- 
chi (Rhode Island) and Zoeller (Navy); 
tackles, Zahler <Grinnell) and Zakin 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



O, never say that I was false of heart, 

Though absence from this class makes 
it so seem. 

Off easier might I from my life de- 
part 

Than from my humble bed and my 
sweet dream. 



BINGAMAN'S SI 



L'ICK 
TNCH 

Sandwiches— Hot Beef, Ham, Egg, 

Weiner, Cheese, Hamburger 

Vegetable Soup, Baked Beans, 

lee Cream 

1 W. PINE ST. SELINSGROVE 



(Wake Forest); guards, Zabiliski (Bos- 
ton College) and Zene (Holy Cross); 
center, Zrdowski (Manhattan) ; quar- 
terback, Zuback (Susquehanna); half- 
backs, Ziesel (Creighton) and Zeski 
(Ursinus); fullback. Zirinsky (Lafay- 
ette). 

Some years ago Joe E. Brown honor- 
ed outstanding small college gridmen 
and singled out Harry Swoope, who 
was a star tackle and co-captain of the 
Crusaders that year. Swoope had a 
number of personal leters from the 
famed movie comedian during the 
season. 

, s 

S. A. I. Girls Breakfast 
Along Susquehanna River 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



Thursday morning at 6:15 a. m. the | 
Sigma Alpha Iota pirls rolled out of ' 
their beds and turned toward the river 
on a breakfast hike. The quartermaster 
issued bacon and eggs made on the , 
banks of the Susquehanna. The mist 
was thick when the girls arrived, but 
It began to lift before the girls hurried 
back for their eight o'clocks. 

strand 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



i r a i 

stnbury 



R I 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



NOW PLAYING 

Ronald Colman 
Ginger Rogers 



hi 



"Lucky Pardners" 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

Myrna Loy 
Melvyn Douglas 



in 



"Third Finger, 
Left Hand" 

MONDAY, TUESDAY, and 
WEDNESDAY 

James Cagney 
Ann Sheridan 

in 

"City of Conquest" 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The ? &e*a£l Store 

Registered Drug: Store 
SELTNSGROVE, PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting; Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

"Rhythm on the 
River" 

with 

Bing Crosby 

Mary Martin 

Basil Rathbone 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 



it 



BOOM TOWN" 

with 

Clark Gable 

Spencer Tracy 

Claudette Colbert 

Hedy Lamarr 

Frank Morgan 

MONDAY 

"Sailor's Lady" 

with 

Nancy Kelly 

Jon Hall 
Joan Davis 

TUESDAY 

"The Way of All 
Flesh" 

with 

Akim Tamiroff 
Gladys George 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



325 Market St 
SUNBURY - 



- 706 Market St 
MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS. DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



TYDOL VEEDOL 

RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street. Sellnsjjrove. Pa 



B. K. W COACH LINE 

Tries to give the Colleee Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students Whv TRAVEL with 
in individual? The Coarh Line In- 
-lire- every person. THINK THAT 
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Factories: 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1940 



University Band Plays 
New Alma Mater Hymn 

The band in a Crusader "S" on the 
football field had just finished playing 
the Alma Mater; a signal and every 
member moved to take his position in 
the SU formation. There was silence 
for a moment and then we heard the 
Alma Mater Hymn. The deep and 
organ like tones of the band made us 
all feel the power of the hymn. 

The Alma Mater Hymn, words writ- 
ten by Dr. Arthur Wilson and the mu- 
sic composed by Mr. Elrose Allison, 

was the outcome of a conversation be- j Dinner, Theatre Party 

tween these two faculty members In I 

which they discussed the desirability j Members of Omega Delta Sigma 
of such a hymn. made their annual jaunt to the Home- 

The hymn will be played by the band [ stead Tearoom, Sunbury, last Wednes- 
at all our games, and it is expected i day evening in the interests of their 
that the student body will cooperate stomachs, 
with the band in making this one of 



GALT ANNOUNCES EXAMS 

Dean Gait has announced that 
the mid-semester examination per- 
iod this year will extend from Mon- 
day. October 11, to Saturday, No- 
vember 2. The dean explained that 
the period covers two weeks in- 
stead of the one-week period as 
used last year in order that stu- 
dents may have more time to pre- 
pare between examinations. 



Freshmen Begin Work 
On November 16 Dance 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNI 
SUCCEED AT COACHING 



0. 1). S. Enjoys Sunbury 



The freshman class is planning to 
hold a dance! At a meeting held last 
Friday in Steele Science Hall, room 
100, they began preparations for the 
annual freshman dance. 

November 16, the day of the final 
football game of the '40 season, is the 
date desired for this occasion. Each 
member of the class will be assessed to 
aid in defraying the expenses involved. 
A committee of three was appointed 
by President Wert to select an orches- 
i tra. 



Pre-theological Club 
Holds Initial Meeting 



(Continued from Page 1) 
been dubbed one of the most suc- 
cessful high school mentors in the 
state by Jock Sutherland, coach of the 
Brooklyn Dodgers. 

Holding these successful football 
coaches as an ideal, this year's mighty 
men of the gridiron may feel optimistic 
about their future ability in the same 
line. 

S 

KEYHOLE SLANTS 
. . . ON KEY BOOKS 



The first meeting of the Pre-theo- 
Twenty-one girls, after arriving at ! logical Club was held in Gustavus 
the outstanding songs of Susquehanna. j the inn in tnree automobiles, proceded | Adolphus Hall on last Tuesday even- 
to make themselves very much at home ] j ng W ith G. Robert Booth presiding, 
at the Homestead. Tlie inee ting opened with prayer by 

Beint; mistresses of gastronomy, they ( Kenneth Wilt followed by scripture 
dined upon such elegant culinary ac- ! reading by Eugene Smith. 



THE ALMA MATER HYMN 
Favor us with Thy love, O Lord, 
And keep us in Thy tender ward; 
Heed us and answer this our prayer, 
Bless now our college by Thy care! 



Faith in God make us true and strong, 
E'er yielding a life so rich and long; 
May Alma Mater live to be 
Ever one spirit, Lord, with Thee! 
S 

Phi Mu Delta Trounces 
B. K.'s for 4th Victory 



; eomplishments as breaded chops and 

i frozen salads. In spite of the compe- 
tition of Bucknell students in the next 

J room they managed to keep up their 

I share of chatter. 

Jane Hutchison made the arrange- 
ments for ihe dinner and everyone 

Icame out feeling as though the eyes 
had been bigger than the stomachs. 

After the dinner about half of the 
girls struck up an even gayer mood 



President G. Robert Booth welcomed 
the freshman Pre-theological students 
and extended to them the rich oppor- 
tunities which are available as mem- 
bers of the club. 

An inspirational address was deliv- 
ered to the group by Dr. T. W. 
Kretschmann, who has for many years 
been associated with the activities of 
ministerial students at Susquehanna. 
Dr. Kretschmann presented some time- 



With ideal weather conditions pre- j by seeing "Strike Up the Band" at the j v advice to the group and stated what 



vailing yesterday, the seventh game of Strand theatre, 
the '40 touch football season found j Everyone had such a nice time that 
Phi Mu Delta scoring its fourth | it was hinted they might, later in the 
straight win. Beta Kappa was the vie- j year, repeat this enjoyable trip, 
tim this time, the score being 60 to 6. S 

Jim Milford tossed a touchdown pass Pacts Revealed About 
to Don Stiber in the early moments of ~ . , , p . i Tl^^f 
the first period and the outcome was otilUrQity S viriu ilOSl 

never in doubt thereafter. 



The win gave Phi Mu Delta the in- 



As indicated in last minute reports 



side track to the championship as they received from the camp of the Juniata 
have only two games left on their Indians there is a "beat Susquehanna 



schedule. 



Art Wendell to Furnish 



movement under way. It seems that 
Juniata, although evidencing great 
strength this season, is not taking Sat- 
urday's game lightly. Facts submitted 

Music at Inter- Frat Ball b > lhe Juniata coachin e staff follow: 

Probable starting line-up: 

The annual Fall Inter-fraternity 
Dance will be held Saturday night, Oc- 
tiber 19, in the Alumni Gymnasium. 
The orchestra, under the direction of 
Art Wendell, is a newcomer to the cam- 
pus. Wendell and his orchestra hail Z 
from Scranton. 

The committee in charge of the affair 
is composed of Neil Fisher, Melvin 
Jones, and Dan McCartney. 



(he considered the primary obligations 
)f ministers in order that they might 
fully realize their responsibility in the 
world in which we are living today. 

The meeting closed with the friend- 
ship circle and benediction by Dr. 
Kretschmann. 

S 

In French, from two to three 
A moron sits (that's me), 
t doze as I sit 
And both grammar and lit 
Are as lar away as Paree. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
authors and critics, whose selection of 
a title for the Book-of-the-Month Club 
thus brings an author into immediate 
prominence because the book immedi- 
ately reaches the homes of several 
hundred thousand thoughtful readers 
who belong to the Club. The selec- 
tions made by the Club range thru the 
whole gamut of literature: romance 
and fiction, art, history, drama, philo- 
sophy, biography. 

Such a book is the October choice on 
our Book-of-the-Month Club member- 
ship: "Trelawny." by Margaret Arm- 
strong, as thrilling a book of biography 
as one could hope for. Edward Tre- 
lawny. a dashing courageous, vital, ec- 
centric, unreliable adventuring young 
Englishman of the late 18th century 
sailed the seven seas. In the service of 
France he captured a pirate town in 
bloodcurdling Madagascar, rescued and 
married the daughter of an Arab sheik 
but soon lost her through poisoning. 
Later, in Italy, Trelawny's friendship 
with Shelley was so deep that at Shel- 



ley's tragic death it was Trelawny who 
undertook the burning of his body on 
the beach. In Greece, he fought with 
Byron for Greek liberty; visiting Amer- 
ica, he bought a slave in order to be 
able to set him free. This life of in- 
credible adventure is fact, not fiction. 
At 81 he died, and at his request his 
ashes were buried beside those of Shel- 
ley in Rome. 

Other books which our library has 
received on its Book-of-the-Month 
Club membership are: Boswell: Amer- 
ican Painting; Lady Russell: Mr. Skef- 
fington (fiction); Sholem Asch (the 
famous Jewish writer) : The Nazerine, 
a life of Christ; Durant: The Story of 
Greece. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

(HILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



Pre-medical Students 
To Take Aptitude Test 

Of interest to all pre-medical stu- 
dents who are planning to enter a 
medical school by the fall of 1941, is 
the aptitude test to be given under the 
auspices of the American Medical As- 
sociation. The test will be held on 
Friday, November 8, at 3 p. m. in the 
Siecle Science building, room 202. The 
test is not designed as a measure of 
specialized knowledge but is rather 
meant to test the normal requirements 
for admission to a graduate medical 
school and it gives special emphasis 
to ih*' subjects which show the ability 
to learn medical science. 

Since 1910 the American Medical As- 
sociation, which is the professional or- 



Player Position 


No. 


Tyson 


RE. 


45 


Moses 


R.T. 


54 


Bonsell 


R.G. 


52 


Dunmire 


C. 


47 


Nettleton 


L.G. 


55 


Brenner 


L.T. 


56 


Z wicker 


LE. 


51 


Brenner 


R.H. 


48 


Strayer 


R.H. 


39 


Leeper 


F.B. 


50 


Grega 


Q.B. 


43 


Leopold 


L.H. 


49 


Line average, 


184. 




Backs average 


, 176. 




Team average 


180. 
— S 





wt. 

185 
202 
175 
170 
170 
200 
186 
182 
165 
180 
163 
180 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



Misconceptions of Study 

From "How to Study in College" 

1. A college student can study bet- 
ter with the radio on; 

2. He can study better with some- 
one else; 

3. He can study only when "in the 
mood;" 

4. He can study best at certain 
hours ; 

5. He can study better lying down; 

6. He can study better with his feet 
higher than his head; 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining- Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 




REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



7. He doesn't have "the knack" for 
,ni, at ion of the practicing physicians a certain subject and consequently 
id the country, has provided for the cannot master it. 

Inspection and rating of all institu- ; S 

tlons attempting to prepare young : The weekly newspaper in Steelton, 
people for the M.D. degree. The re- ; known as the "Steelton News," has 
suits of these tests are turned over to I been taken over by Francis Miller, '36, 
the graduate schools and have proven 
an invaluable criterion for the selec- 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



First Narional Bank of Selins Grove 
Welcome* Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



who becomes its new editor and pub- 
lisher He has been very generous with 



tion of students. Due to the impor- 
tance of the test it is urged that all 
pre-medical students make arrange- 
ments with Dr. Scudder immediately to Alumni Club 
take it. 

There will be a fee of one dollar pay- 
able to Dr. Scudder from each exam- 
inee. 



complimentary advertisement for his 
alma mater. Mr. Miller is also presi- 
dent oi the Harrisburg-Susquehanna 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., SellnsgTove, Pa. 



v , "Let's get 
l^^-^Coca-Cola" 



ROYAL Portable TYPEWRITERS 
STATIONERY SUPPLIES 



JOS. S. MENTZ 

'(it; Market Square 
Sunbury, Penna. 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 



Northumberland, Pa, 



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Hot Hi n tf Works 

SUNBURY 
B. P. O. Edwards, Manager 



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MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

Come to Life at 

LIEB'S 

"For Things That Are Different" 
SUNBURY, PENNA. 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 



Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An aerredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

'.-RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A B . B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Prea 
Russell Gait, Ph.D.. Dean 



- 



*J*5" 



?N 



' - 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



Debaters to Meet 

The first meeting of the Susque- 
hanna Debate Association will be held 
Thursday afternoon at 4 p. m. in G. 
A., 301. All newcomers to the squad, 
as well as the veterans, are urged to 
attend this meeting. 

Deadline for Photos 

Nancy Griesemer has announced 
that proofs for individual Lanthorn 
pictures must be returned to her before 
noon on Friday, October 25. 

"Big Sisters" to Entertain 

The "big sisters," assigned by the S. 
C. A. at the beginning of the year, will 
entertain their freshman friends on a 
hike Saturday afternoon. The group 
will leave Seibert Hall around two 
o'clock. 

Biemics to Hike to Mahanoy 

The Biemic Society will sponsor a 
hike to the top of Mt. Mahanoy Sat- 
urday afternoon from 12:45 to 5:00. 
Non-members are invited to join the 
party. 

Crusaders Face C. C. N. Y. 

Coach A. A. Stagg, Jr., will send his 
gridmen into Lewisohn Stadium in 
New York City Saturday afternoon to 
face the City College of New York in 
the fifth clash of the season. City 
College has a record of two defeats and 
one tie this season. 

Great Radio Program Sunday 

The attention of all students, who 
have access to a radio, is called to the 
program being presented by The Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System Sunday 
afternoon from 4:30 to 5:00 p. m. This 
program will be one of a series in 
which outstanding literary works are 
dramatized; the number of this Sun- 
day is Aristotle's "Ethics." See page 
two for a review of the book. 

Dr. Luther Reed to Speak 

Dr. Luther Reed, president of the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Mt. 
Airy, will speak in vesper service Sun- 
day evening at 5:45. 

What is the S. C. A.? 
What Does it Do? 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SEL1NSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, OCTOBER 2:2, 1940 



Number 11 



Straw Vote Results in Seniors Chosen for 
Victory for Willkie Who's Who of Stu- 
dents in America 



Business Society Conducts Poll; 
Warner and Smith Represent Roose- 
velt and Willkie 



The S. C. A. is the largest and most 
active organization on the campus. 

The S. C. A. sponsors vespers, chapel, 
parties, socials, etc. 

The S. C. A. edits the handbook. 

The S. C. A. plans freshmon orien- 
tation activities. 

The S. C. A. joins in inter-collegiate 
conferences, such The Lutheran Stu- 
dent Association and The World's Stu- 
dent Christian Federation. 

The S. C. A. holds discussion groups 
that consider vital problems of cam- 
pus life. 



The Business Society conducted a 
political poll among the students last 
week and the results when tabulated 
showed Susquehanna leaning toward 
the Republicans. Frank "Happy" Cor- 
coran, the chairman of the meeting, 
introduced the speakers who repre- 
sented the two presidential candidates. 
The first speaker, Fred Warner, sup- 
ported Roosevelt and his main argu- 
ments for the Democrats was that the 
people on election day should not 
'change horses in the middle of the 
stream." In other words, in view of 
the present situation we should not 
allow the leadership of the government 
to change hands because if the gov- 
ernment were put into the hands of 
an inexperienced leader just now the 
outcome would be disastrous. 

After a few selections by a hill billy 
band composed of members of the 
Bond and Key fraternity, the second 
speaker was introduced. He was Eu- 
gene Smith, who supported Wendel 
Willkie and the Republican party. His 
chief argument against Roosevelt was 
the issue of the third term. To sup- 
port his arguments he gave proof of 
what the country would become if 
Roosevelt remained in office for a third 
term. He also brought out what Roose- 
velt has done so far which was against 
the principles of our government. 

The next speaker was Mortimer 
Snerd, the Peoples' Choice, who was 
so sure of nis popularity that all he 
said was that he was confident the 
people would vote the right way— for 
Snerd. 

When the votes were tabulated, out 
of the 156 votes cast, 103 were for 
Willkie, 39 for Roosevelt, 2 were In- 
dependent, and 12 cast their votes for 
Snerd, the Peoples' Choice. 
S 

Biemic Society to Hike 
To Mahanoy Mountain 

Mount Mahanoy is the highest point 

in this vicinity. Many of the alumni 

consider the experience of climbing 

this mountain and the resultant view 

to be one of the high points in their 

college career. This Saturday, October 

| 26, the Biemic Society will revive the 

: old custom by sponsoring a hike to the 

i summit of Mount Mahanoy. 



Last week, the faculty was again 
asked to vote for the members of the 
senior class who should be included 
in the publication known as "Who's 
Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges." 

The faculty members were asked to 
vote for the four senior women and 
four men who, in their estimation, were 
outstanding in (1) character, (2) schol- 
arship, (3) leadership in extra-curricu- 
lar activities, and (4) possibilities of 
future usefulness to business and so- 
ciety. Since scholarship is the only 
one of the above qualities which can 
be definitely measured, the faculty was 
furnished with a list of the twelve 
senior women and the twelve senior 
men who led their class in scholarship 
last semester. 

The result of the faculty vote is as 
follows: (the names are arranged al- 
phabetically): 

Marion H. Boyer 

Faith Harbeson 

Elsie Hochella 

Florence Reitz 

Joseph Pasterchik 

Paul Shatto 

Harry Thatcher 

Michael Wolf 

These eight names are being for- 
warded to the publishers for inclusion 
in the forthcoming issue of "Who's 
Who." 

S 

Registration Recalls 
Drafts of Last War 



DRAFT ACT DISCUSSED AS TO ITS 
ECONOMIC PROVISIONS; IMPLICATIONS 

Status of Conscripts Explained in Reference to 
Moratorium Proviso on Debts Incurred Prior to 
Period of Military Training 

Susquehanna Arranges e y dr. h a heath 

Polo EVrti-if -IVvm. V 1. ,„,,,; Modern warfare involves many hi?h- 

*i«lld EiVeill lUr miimiU ji y technical activities which can be 

effectively performed only by men who 



"Renew friendships, watch football 
?ames, eat, and dance" will be the mot- 
tO of Susquehanna's alumni for Home- 
coming Day, on Saturday, November 9. 
More alumni on our campus than there 
ever were before is the aim of the ad- 
ministration and the student body. A I 
elorious day equal to that of last year 
is the fervent hope of all. 

The setting is becoming perfect as 
the leaves are already changing colors, 
presenting a picture well impressed on 
the memory of every grad. One of the 
last chances to see Susquehanna's sup- 
erb football team in action will be af- 
forded to all. This day will lack noth- 
ing in the way of entertainment, en- 
thusiasm and gaiety. Luncheons, in- 
terclass sports, pep jamboree, torch 
parade, and a bon-fire are but a few 
outstanding features. 

The fraternities will supply plenty of 
entertainment in the evening. Bond 
and Key will held a dance. Beta 
Kappa will offer the old grads a ban- 
quet and a dance while Phi Mu Delia, 
the second oldest fraternity on cam- 
pus, will celebrate its twenty-fifth an- 
niversary by having a banquet in the 
Governor Snyder Hotel. A dance will 
follow. 



S. C. A. Hears About 
Wholesome Attitudes 



The registration of about fifty elig- 
ible young men last week on the Sus- 
quehanna University campus is a re- 
minder of the unusual record Susque- I 
hanna University made in the First 

World War. Susquehanna was the | " A Wholesome Student Opinion on 
only college in the whole country able i ° ur Campus" was the topic on which 
to muster two complete Army Ambu- ! Harrv Thatcher spoke at the Thurs- 



1 some of the other students will be in- 
terested and will accompany them. 
Cars will leave Seibert at 12:45. Drs. 
Fisher, Scudder, and Houtz will lead 
the expedition and will comment on 
geological and biological items of in- 
terest. 



\ 



Twenty members of the society will 

The*S. C. A. attempts to create an j make the ascent, but they tope that 
atmosphere of fellowship and good- 
will. 

The S. C. A. brings to the campus j 
speakers outstanding in their fields 
of activity. 
Why Should I Join the 8. C. A.? 

Membership makes you an active 
worker in this service organization. 

Membership admits you free to spe- 
cial S. C. A. functions. 

Membership entitles you to represent 
Susquehanna at inter-collegiate con- 
ferences. 

Membership entitles you to a vote 
in choosing officers of the S. C. A. for 
the following year. 

Membership enables you to give ac- 
tive support in making the S. C. A. a 
bigger and a stronger organization. 
S 

Mrs. Heath Becomes 
New Honorary of K.D.P. 



lance Corps at that time from among 
the students and the alumni. 

The organization of the United States 
Army Ambulance Corps was largely due 
to the initiative and executive ability 
of Dr. Sydney Bateman, distinguished 
alumnus, who is scheduled to speak 
next month at Susquehanna. 

A little over twenty years ago, Sus- 
quehanna also sponsored a Campus 
Student Army Training Corps with 
daily drills in the gymnasium for all 
the boys. Then on June 8, 1917 the 
fateful day appeared when the first 
group of students left for active ser- 
vice. 

Some Susquehannans were pushed to 

the front of nearly every battle. They 

were ready to participate in the Battle 

of Vittoria-Venito, and they were pres- 

( Continued on Page 4) 



day evening meeting of the Student 
Christian Association. 

Lester Yarnell was the devotional 
leader and chose as his scripture that 
portion of St. John's gospel wherein 
we are told "love one another, as I 
have loved you." 

Harry spoke about the state of stu- 
dent attitude which is prevalent on 
every college campus. The first type 
of student we have to contend with is 
the "griper;" we should try to influence 
him to a more healthy attitude toward 
life. The second type is the law-break- 
er, the infringer, through whose influ- 
ence other students are led off the 
track of acquiring knowledge and of 
building up a worthwhile character. It 
Is up to us, as Christian students, to 
make a definite stand against those ill- 
informed lines of activity and in their 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Student Advocates Regimentation for Post-Dinner 
Dancing as Result of Masculine Non- Participation 



It Hitler had his way, evening social ] fact not everybody does dance. Grant 
life at Susquehanna would be some- I ed Susquehanna University is a seat 
what different from the status quo. j of higher learning. Grant also, then, 

After the evening meal, a gong would ; not all learning is out of books, 
ring out. All the boys would imme- I The girls complain— and who can 
diately rise from their seats, march in blame them?— there aren't enough 
double quick time from Horton Dining | boys. Anybody in Selinsgrove will tell 
Room, through the entrance hall, down : you there are four girls to one boy 
the steps, and into the basement social j "out there at school," and while that 
rooms ratio is a little flagrant, it's still on the 

The boys gone, the gong would ring debit side, 
again. This time the girls would rise I When, to the fact there aren't 



The girls pick no quarrel with those 
boys who do dance, except to mention, 
in passing, that lots of boys go steady, 
and this cuts down on the other girls' 
exercise. If those boys think only their 
girls are nice, they haven't met any 
of the other girls. 

Some boys can dance but won't. The 
girls heap anathema on their heads 
Maybe they think lessons are more 
important? But the dancing ends by 

even -thirty, in time for even abnormal 



have had specialised training and prac- 
tice. The development of the necessary 
skills is a time consuming process but 
no nation is adequately prepared to 
defend itself until its defensive forces 
have received at least a preliminary 
training. 

The United States has been painful- 
ly slow in recogni ing the urgent need 
for starting a training program before 
it is too late, but the Selective Service 
Law now declares that it is imperative 
to train the personnel of armed forces. 
The primary purpose of this new law 
is to strengthen our national defenses. 
The possible future benefit is great 
enough to justify considerable present 
1 sacrifice. Accordingly, the 800,000 
young men who are privileged to par- 
; ticipate in its operation will find that 
! more or less personal inconvenience is 
necessary. An attempt, however, is 
made to avoid undue hardships by 
granting special rights and immunities 
to the selected men. 

The economic status of a young man 
will not be affected directly unless he 
is selected for training. When he is 
inducted into service, he will receive 
maintenance plus $21.00 a month for 
the first four months and $30.00 each 
month thereafter. The financial po- 
sition of an unemployed man will 
, therefore be improved by entering the 
service. 

One who is gainfully employed will 
probably be absent from his job for 
twelve months. Then, in most cases, 
he has the right to be restored to his 
former position or similar employment. 
He shall be considered as having been 
on furlough or leave of absence during 
his period of military training, shall 
be entitled to his seniority rating and 
other benflts and shall not be dis- 
charged without cause within one year. 
The law permits his employer to pay 
him compensation in addition to his 
military pay while he is in service, but 
this is not required. 

A moratorium on the payment of 
debts has been provided for those un- 
able to continue payments out of their 
$30.00 a month service pay. Goods pur- 
chased by a trainee on the installment 
plan may not be repossessed during his 
period of training. Mortgages may not 
be foreclosed against him during that 
time. The Veterans Administration 
will keep his life insurance in force up 
to $5000. The aim is to suspend or 
postpone his obligations until he re- 
turns from his term of service. 

Provision is made in the Act for de- 
ferment from litary service of men 
whose employment is necessary to the 
national health, safety or interest. 
(Continued on Page 4) 
S 



Wednesday evening, October 16, Mrs. — — ~ ' oderly ~ flles down into enough boys in the first place, you add j lessons. And if they don't like the girls 
Harvey Heath was pledged as an hon- , anu .' \" ± ? •» „ „„ fl ,„ ^„„ K i„ „™^ mn ,t nP „ iw n, ot n f ! _*w«-« h™.m» hM« 



orary of Kappa Delta Phi sorority. The 
informal initiation was in charge of 
Fern Arentz, June Jerore, and Mary 
Lee Krumholtz, after which Mrs. 
Heath received the formal pledge from 
the president, Marion Crompton. At 
the close of the meeting refreshments 
were served. Those serving on the 
iood committee were: Mary Lee 
Krumbholtz, Ruth Bier, and Dorothy 
Webber. Miss Viola DuFrain, the so- 
rority advisor, and Mrs. Carter Oster- 
bind were guests at the meeting. 



the basement, there to line up opposite the doubly condemnatory fact that of 
the boys. 

Gauleiter would stalk between the 
two ruler-straight rows of students to 
the end of the room. Then, in his 
sharp, husky voice, he would bark, 
"Forward, march!" The lines would 



those boys extant, many don't dance, 
you see the girls can make out a case. 

They divide Susquehanna males in- 
to these classes : ( 1 1 The angels who 
can dance, (2) The devils who can but 
don't care to, (3) Those who can dance 



they're doubly heels 

Shy boys need to be taken in hand 
They also need courage. Because the 
girls need them. At least the males 
will be gladly made welcome. 

A few boys live too far from campus 
this does not include the fraternities 



Art Wendel Pleases 
Inter-fraternity Men 



converge. "Halt, one, 



two!" The two but are too shy (not many of these), They're practically next door.) to brave 



NOTICE TO DEBATERS 

The first meeting of the Susque- 
hanna Debate Association will be 
held on Thursday afternoon at 4 
o'clock in G. A., Room 301. All vet- 
eran and prospective debaters are 
urged to be present at this meeting. 



lines would stop, facing each other. : (4) Those who aren't able to dance be- 
"Muslc!" Non- Aryan records would ; cause they live too far from the cam- 
revolve on the turntable. pus, and, finally, (I) Those who just 

Each boy would dance with the girl j can't dance, 
opposite him, regardless who she was 1 Of the one hundred seventy-nine 
and who he was. Correctly, in perfect boys listed on the Student Roster, fifty 



the winter snow and bluster, to brave 
a woman's charm and chatter. 

Then there are those who Just can't 

dance. A surprisingly large number of 

I pretty girls are more than eager to 

! teach these boys the gentle and ac- 



rhythm, they would circle the floor, j seven are off campus. Approximately complished art of terpsichore. 



under the tough eyes of the Gauleiter half to two-thirds of these are too far 

and his aides. There would be no away to show up for evening dancing, 

laughing. (Anti-Hitler jokes, you The rest are either at work or are 

know.) There would be no talking heels, 
whatever. (Spies, you know.) Sixty-five men live in the dormitor- 

And there'd be one advantage— every- ies. Some cooperate with the girls, 

body would dance. Fifty-seven men live in the fraternity and, then, 

All of which serves to Ulustrate the , houses. Some give the girls a break. I There are the girls 



The argument so far seems one-sided 
—in favor of the girls. 

Are there incentives for the males? 

Well, there are new records, dug up 
especially to lure the dear brutes down 
the stairs and into the social rooms, 



Someone said there was to be a 
'ance on Saturday night, bit the 
entlemen almost didn't make it. You 
ee folks, there was a football game at 
uniata in the afternoon, and that's 
vhere all our students went. 

At nine o'clock there were about a 

lOMD couples there, with plenty of 

oom to "jive" to the music of Art 

Weiidel's Orchestra. By 9:30 the team 

made its appearance with their beau- 

iful damsels (having made good use 

)f their curling irons after the day's 

;now storm). By 10:30 (in time for in- 

rrmlsslon) the band members and 

cheerleaders strolled in in all their 

•lory, dragging with them their much 

fatigued dates. Now that every one 

was finally there, the dance could be- 

■ in— but no, those that were there ear- 

ler left at intermission, so once again 

lice were just a scattered few. 

Everyone seemed to enjoy the or- 
chestra immensely. They played a 
dreamy waltz about which every one 
is still commenting. Disregarding all 
fompliritions I :n's ,r\ l.aVthere will 
oe many fond memories lingering to 
while away the dull moments. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940 






THE SUSQUEHANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.00 a Year. Payable to Maxine Heefner. '42, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association, 

Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., 
College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle 
Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson. '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton, '42; Donald Bashore. '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella Fetheroff, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjorle Wolfe, '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, 
'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine 
Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, 
'43; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer. '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane 
Shotts, '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Fred Warner 
Advertising Managers Chester Shusta 

Assistants ! £""* c °^°™ n 

I Dorothy Webber 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. 
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR TEAM ! 

THE SUSQUEHANNA wishes to congratulate the football 
team upon their excellent showing during the first half of the 
grid season. 

We would say "well done" not only to the varsity eleven but 
to each of the men on the squad who have given heavily of 
time and work in the unselfish interest of the team. To the 
coaching staff, who serve faithfully behind the scene, we would 
extend our deep appreciation. 

If we are to judge from what has gone so far, we can see 
possibilities for a great season this year — the greatest since 
1932. All Susquehanna joins in wishing continued success for 
our Crusaders. 

S 

JOIN THE S. C. A. 

Each year at this time the Student Christian Association 
conducts a drive to secure new members. We urge each student 
to affiliate himself with this important group, and thus help in 
the services which it performs. Undoubtedly, it does a vast 
amount of good in many ways, including freshman orientation, 
sending members to various conferences with similar groups 
in other colleges, bringing speakers of note to the campus, con- 
ducting bi-monthly evening meetings, weekly chapel services, 
and weekly Sunday vespers. 

Likewise the S. C. A. fills a definite place in the social life 
of Susquehanna. It sponsors informal parties such as the one 
during the first week of school and the very successful leap 
year dance of last year. The Memorial Day outing is always 
lots of fun, and we feel that the carol singing and Christmas 
party are a definite S. U. tradition, and the climax of the Christ- 
mas season on campus. 

THE SUSQUEHANNA upholds the program of the S. C. A. 
as one of the really constructive forces of S. U., which main- 
tains the Christian standards of the university and improves 
the general moral tone. Therefore, we reiterate, "Join the S. 
C. A." 

S — 

WHY NOT COOPPERATE? 

We understand from the Men's Dormitories Committee that 
attempts are being made to improve further the study environ- 
ment in the men's residences. We wish to express our full sym- 
pathy with any such action. 

There has been much improvement in the conduct of the 
dormitories since the inauguration of the new proctor system 
by Dean Gait a year ago. Let us express congratulations to all 
those, especially the residents of the buildings, who have coop- 
erated in making such progress possible. 

There are numerous instances, however, in which students 
could further improve the conduct of their college home by be- 
ing more considerate of the rights of others. We are convinced 
that these little acts are a result of thoughtlessness rather than 
of any deliberate violation of rules. Freshmen, especially, are 
likely to be offenders until they become accustomed to dormi- 
tory life. 

Let us all, freshmen and upper-classmen, work together 
toward the goal of more orderly residences. The ability to live 
an orderly life is a characteristic found in all "real college 
men." 

Lanthom Editor Stales (irothe a,ld n Williamson 
Deadline for Pictures Conduct Sunday vespers 



(.e. 



JOE AESOP SPEAKS" 



Once upon a Time there was a Prac- 
tice Teacher named Candace. 

It was her First Day of Actual Prac- 
tice Teaching, although she had been 
observing for weeks and weeks. 

Candace entered Room Nine with 
Trepidation. She Knew All About high 
school students. 

Candace gained the Desk and Ven- 
tured a Look at her Charges. 

Seventeen bright. Interested Faces 
beamed back at her with a Sweetness 
that those Familiar with high school 
students would not have Recognized. 

"I am dreaming," mused Candace. 

"Good morning, Boys and Girls," 
she said. 

"Good morning, Dear Teacher," 
chanted the class. 

"It won't last," Candace thought. 
But It Did! 

The Cherubs laughed just long 
enough at her Jokes — New Yorker 
Brand. 

They were attentive. 

They didn't throw Spit Balls. 



They didn't Whisper. 

What was Worse, they Knew the 
Lesson ! 

They had obviously Studied ! ! 

Candace couldn't stand it. 

She Foamed at the Mouth. 

She shrieked a long, loud, horrible 
Shriek. 

She pulled out a Handful of her own 
Carefully-Coifed-Curls. 

"Do something," she hollered. "Do 
.something. I Can't stand it. You're 
Superhuman!" 

She stared at them Wildly until the 
Principal came and led her to His of- 
fice. 

"There, there," he soothed, as he 
eased her into a Strait Jacket. 

Back in Room Nine, Seventeen high 
school students leaped About in De- 
moniacal Glee. 

They had claimed another Victim. 

Moral: There's More than one Way 
to Skin a Cat. 

— Joe Aesop. 
S 



f.< 



CAMPUS TIDBITS" 



"Anybody can beat Susqule" tabbed 
a PM sportscribe commenting on the 
Swarthmore - Susquehanna football 
game. An indignant, local restaurant 
proprietor wrote to PM's football-wise 
(?) columnist. The reply read: "I 
meant, anybody can beat Swarthmore." 
P. S. Swarthmore had been unde- 
feated in twelve starts before meeting 
Susquehanna. 

Student interest in the second fea- 
ture of Susquehanna's Star Course 
should be very high. Rockwell Kent, 
called the only truly American artist 
among his contemporaries, is an Ameri- 
can by birth, in his style of execution, 
and the nature of his success. Al- 
though famed as a painter, Mr. Kent 
is widely known as a lithographer, an 
author, and a voyager and explorer. 
His art works are represented in such 
leading American art institutions as 
The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 
New York. The Art Institute of Chi- 



cago, and The San Francisco Museum. 
The introduction of Rockwell Kent to 
the Susquehanna Campus will be very 
welcome to those of us who appreciate 
having the opportunity to hear from 
illustrious exponents of the fine arts. 

William S. Livengood, at Juniata's 
dedication of Oiler Hall, before Intro- 
ducing Governor Arthur H. James, very 
admirably presented the main advan- 
tages of a small college which, at times, 
we are prone to forget. The religious 
spirit of colleges like Juniata and Sus- 
quehanna has an advantage over larg- 
er colleges in building up a distinct 
character of the individual student 
which, in later life would enable the 
alumni to rely upon in times of strife 
and hardship. The second point which 
Livengood stressed was relative to the 
friendships, and student-professor con- 
tacts obtainable in the small college in 
place of the number of buildings in the 
larger college. 



ff 



ODDS 'N ENDS" 



Stuff 

Many people wonder what goes on 
in the Conservatory. I found out. 
There are eight teachers and about 50 
or 60 students. They have recitals, 
practice periods, classes, and private 
lessons. The recitals are held in the 
chapel. Everybody participates. In 
the Con there are about 25 pianos. On 
these the aforesaid students practice. 
They have classes on everything con- 
cerning music. Private lessons are giv- 
en in voice, piano, and any band or 
orchestra instrument. Screwballs such 
as Wolfgang, Wert, and James are 
there. They also have a class called 
Eurhythmies. One learns to polka, ma- 
zurka, square dance, skip and hop. All 
of this can be done with bare feet, too. 
At the present time, the sophs are tak- 
ing this course on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days at eleven. Miss Shure welcomes 
visitors. Not so the sophs. In the class 
may be found DeBarr, Nevin, Rothen- 
berg, James, Dellecker, Bowers, Holmes, 
and other notables. There are also 
practice teachers, who teach the chil- 
dren to sing "do, re, and mi," and 
about such worthy subjects as: Two 
Small Blackbirds Sitting on a Fence, 
Funny Bunny, My Flute, etc. These 
pleasures can all be yours, readers. . . . 
Someone told me that a frosh told Dr. 
Kretschmann there were mermaids in 
the sea. The reaction must have been 
interesting. . . . Also found at the Juni- 
ata game were such notables as Gov- 
ernor James, Mary Livengood, and 
Paul Pneumonia. . . . Fletcher thanks 
Bantley for buying a battery for the 



Ford. Fletcher thanks Tom Lewis for 
taking care of his correspondence with 
females of the campus. . . . Susque- 
hanna will beat C. C. N. Y. on Sat- 
urday. . . Knobby is hunting for a 
dry cleaner to take care of those white 
pants he wore on this past Saturday 
. . . Young would like to see the game 
at N. Y. He feels he may need medi- 
cal attention. Any bruises seen on 
George Moyer's face are purely coin- 
cidental, not having resulted from reff- 
ing a soccer game. . . . Band of the 
week— Al vino Ray. Plays a plenty solid 
electric guitar. Some of his best discs 
are 12th Street Rag, St. Louis Blues, 
and Sometimes I'm Happy. The com- 
bination of the King Sisters and Al- 
vino Ray is four star. . . . Alvino says 
"buy Copenhagen" and "Stumbling." 
When you've bought those, buy "I 
Know That You Know." Boy, what a 
lot of guitar that guy plays. Cornell 
should have the best team in the coun- 
try, with Tennessee second. Texas A. 
& M. should beat Baylor, Salt picks 
Columbia over Syracuse, Cornell over 
Ohio State, I pick Fordham over St. 
Mary's, A feeble vote for Brown over 
Holy Cross, and, last but not least, 
Penn over Michigan. I have seen 
happy people but Ruthie Naylor took 
the cake on Saturday. . . . Incidentally, 
Lois Yost beamed all over the place 
too. . . . Orchids to Dottie Paulick and 
June Hendricks on Saturday. They 
froze to death for dear old S. U. 
Looked mighty nice, too. 

Olive Oyl. 
S 



MAY WE . . 
. . SUGGEST 

TUESDAY 

The Way of AH Flesh 

Akim Tamiroff takes the role of a 
man who loses his wealth, position, 
and reputation as he pursues his love 
for a wrong woman. Gladys George 
is the lady in the case, and the picture 
promises to be very good— especially 
for those people who just love a goqd 
cry. 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
Spring Parade 

The comic-opera atmosphere of old 
Vienna provides the setting for what 
is probably the best picture Deanna 
Durbin has done yet. She plays the 
part cf an Hungarian peasant girl who 
goes to the fair to sell a goat, has her 
fortune told and finds herself living at 
the home of the emperor's baker. She 
falls in love with Robert Cummings, 
a drummer in the army band and the 
plot revolves around her efforts to get 
a waltz, which Cummings has written, 
to the attention of the emperor. It's 
all a riot of songs and dancing; and 
the final scene, that of the emperor's 
ball, is exceptional. 

FRIDAY 

We Who Are Young 

The trials and tribulations of a 
young married couple are handled as 
per formula; Lana Turner and John 
Shelton are the leads. 

SATURDAY 

The Ranger and the Lady 

Some of these Saturday-night horse 
operas are pretty good and some aren't; 
this one suffers from an overdose of 
romance and a scarcity of action. The 
story concerns the illegal use of the 
Texas Rangers in a wagon train shake- 
down. When Roy Rogers shows his 
dislike for the system, he is fired and 
forms a band of his own to combat the 
racketeers. You mteht guess that 
things turn out all right. 

MONDAY 
Flowing Gold 

John Garfield and Pat O'Brien team 
up in this story of the oil fields, and 
we think it's not bad. John is an oil 
worker who kills a man in self-defence 
and then runs away to escape trial. He 
befriends Pat O'Brien, and Pat gives 
him a job; but there is a good bit of 
squabbling when Garfield falls in love 
with the boss's daughter (Frances 
Farmer). The picture takes the usual 
twist with John, Pat, and Frances all 
helping to lift the mortgage on the 
old oil well. 

S 



Students Experiment with Politics 
Amid Speeches, Banners, Ballots 



During a conference witii Nancy 
Qrtesemer, editor of the Lanthorn, she 
stated that proofa for the individual 

picture! must be in the hands of the 
editor before Friday noon, October L'5 
She further stated that group pic- 
tures will be taken beginning Monday, 
October 28. Announcements mid 
schedules will be posted us to time. 



Vespers Sunday evening were con- 
tliKted by Cornelia Grotlie and Dor- 
othy Williamson 

Cornelia, in her talk, stated that 
Christianity helps man to bear the 
l)iii dens of hie in a much more cheer- 
ful state of mind. 

The Bendiction was pronnounced by 
Dr. T. Kretschmann. 



At the bewitching hour of 6:45 p. m. 
Tuesday, the students poured into the 
chapel. Each was nabbed before en- 
tering by such ward healers as Russell, 
Hochella, and Portzline. Even the lit- 
erature was abundant. 

A broom handle and a sorority 
paddle served as placard holders when 
Cox and Bier marched in bearing: "My 
Friend Roosevelt" and "Eleanor O. K." 
"Good News" Republican floaters were 
passed to each voter. Cheers and boos 
were already in full swing. 

Soon Chairman Happy (Democrat) 
accompanied by hisses and several 
cheers, called the mass meeting to or- 
der He said, "We must be prejudiced!" 
The Wopwallopen mo reflection on 
Katie) Wildcats next held forth. Bond 
and Key seemed to have turned moun- 



taineer. Even Sech was hardly known, 
though Mitotan and his violin would 
never be mistaken. "Your are my Sun- 
shine" was vaguely recognised by the 
end of the number. Jerry Startzel 
rang forth on the solo parts. 

After the Invigorating strains of mu- 
sic, martial music accompanied the ar- 
rival of Mr. Warner and Mrs. Smith 
i hidden in frock coat). Mr. Warner, the 
Democrat defendant, sat behind the 
table bearing Roosevelt's picture, while 
Mr. Smith placed himself behind the 
table bearing Willkie's image. 

Following them was the original hill 
billy himself, Snerd (or Gus if you 
Willi -the people's choice. Mr. Snerd 
was very helpful in unforming public 
opinion. He was very inconsisten with 
(Continued on Page 4) 



OVER THE . . 
. . AIR WAVES 



Following Is a review of Aristotle's 
"Ethics" which is to be dramatized 
over the air by the Columbia Broad- 
casting System on Sunday afternoon 
from 4:30 to 5:00 p. m. The C. B. S. 
is presenting a series of great works 
of literature, one each week at this 
hour. We believe that many students, 
faculty, and alumni will be interested 
in availing themselves of these liter- 
ary masterpieces, and so we will print 
the review of the number to be drama- 
tized each week. 

The "Ethics" of Aristotle is the wis- 
est work of its kind. It was written by 
one whom Dante called "the master of 
them who know," and a sign of its 
mastery is the warning it gives on an 
early page to readers who suppose that 
the attainment of happiness through 
virtue is quick or easy. Aristotle does 
not pretend that he is writing for chil- 
dren or that he can prescribe to them. 
Virtue— or rather the virtues, for the 
author very sensibly admits the exis- 
tence of more than one form which 
the good life must take, at least if it 
is to be lived in the world of men— is 
the result of taking thought, and the 
act of taking thought must be a long- 
established habit before excellence can 
be expected. Excellence will never be 
wholly achieved in a world of accident 
and imperfection, yet the study of it 
is something which the human mind 
cannot evade and remain human. Aris- 
totle proceeds as a human being to 
discuss the problems which all men 
recognize as central to conduct. In 
the course of doing so he develops his 
famous theory of the golden mean. 
He can be misunderstood about this 
only by those who do not read him. 
But it must be true that many have 
not read him, since the golden mean 
is commonly set forth as a compromise 
easily and quickly arrived at by mea- 
suring the distance between extremes 
and dividing it in half. The "Ethics" 
is worth reading if only for its dem- 
onstration that the mean is in fact the 
ideal, and like any other ideal unat- 
tainable. 



TUESDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 






THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<s>- 



-<$>• 



Three Bulwarks of the Crusader Line 










Orange and Maroon Shines for Juniata 

To Play C. C. N. Y. \ 






Susquehanna's Unee co-capiains whose excellent performance in the forward 
wall has contributed to the team's success this year. Left to right they are: 
Joe Greco, left end; Sam Fletcher, right tackle; and John Matthews, right 
guard. 



ORANGE AND MAROON UNDEFEATED BY 
JUNIATA INDIANS IN SCORELESS GAME 



Snow, Extreme Cold, Homecoming Day, Gov- 
ernor James Feature Contest at Huntingdon 
Saturday. S. U. Sends Large Cavalcade, Band 



Battling thru a maze of snow and 
chilly weather, the Crusaders and the 
Juniata Indians upheld their records 
of no defeats by slashing each other up 
and down the field for a 0-0 tie. The 
Orange and Maroon, ready to take their 
fourth victory, were disappointed at the 
weather conditions that made the ball 
a slippery piece of leather and the 
field a swamp of slush. 

An unusually large Homecoming Day 
crowd, with Governor James as a spec- 
tator, slowly froze as the eighteen year 
old rivalry was continued. 

Holding tight throughout the first 
quarter, the Staggmen kept the oppo- 
sition deep in their territory by the 
punting of Zeravica. Line plunges fail- 
ed to net much gain and a punting 
duel was the outcome. 

Juniata's pushing into Susquehanna's 
territory in the second quarter but not 
making much ground gain, evened the 
first half by proving that both teams 
were equal under the circumstances. 

Quickly slicing to the 20 yard line, 
in the third quarter, the Indians at- 
tempted to kick a field goal, but Blair 
Heaton wiggled through a hole in the 
middle of the line and slammed the 
ball-holder for a 15-yard loss which 
cancelled their threat for any kind of 
a marker. 

Action in the last quarter centered 
around the 50-yard line and thrusts 
on either side were short. Susque- 
hanna took to the air in an attempt 
to score, but most of the passes were 
incomplete with Heaton as the objec- 
tive. The game ended with the ball in 
the middle of the field with the Cru- 
saders in charge. 

Quite a contingent of home fans ap- 
peared at Huntingdon, to fill the cheer- 
ing section, which was complete to the 
last word. 

At the half the Orange and Maroon 
Band ducked snowflakes to parade on 
a snow soaked field, in comoetition 
with the Blue and White musicians of 
the opposing team. 

Line-up and satistics: 

Susquehanna Juniata 

Greco L. E Tyson 

R. Matthews ... L. T Moses 

Campana L. G Bonsell 

Templn C Maust 

J. Matthews ... R. G Nettleton 

Fletcher R. T C. Brenner 

Heaton R. E Zwicker 

Zuback Q. B J. Brenner i 

Helm L. H Leeper ; 

Wos R. H Grega 

Zeravica P. B Leopold 

Susquehanna 0—0 1 

Juniata 0—0 1 

Susquehanna substitutes: Meyers, 
halfback; McFall, quarterback; Martin, 
tackle. 

Officials: referee, E. C. Ewing, Muhl- 
enberg; umpire, P. L. Reagan, Villa- 
nova; linesman: E. J. McMillen, Get- 
tysburg. 
Statistical Summary 

S.U. Juniata 
first Downs 7 8 



First Downs, Passes 1 1 

First Downs, Rushes 6 7 

Yards Gained by Rushing . . 108 155 

Yards Lost 18 43 

Yards Gained by Passes 16 45 

Passes Attempted 5 6 

Completed 2 1 

Incomplete 5 5 

Ave. Yardage of Punts 24 27 

Ave. Runback *— mmmttmJUh 4 

Ave. Yardage, Kickoffs 25 

Fumbles 4 2 

Lost Ball 1 

Yards Lost, Penalties 20 10 

S. U. Girls to Host 
At Hockey Play Day 



Another long ride is in prospect for 
Susquehanna's gridders as they roll 
over to New York City to take on C. 
C. N. Y. at Lewisohn Stadium this Sat- 
urday. The team will leave Friday and 
plans to stay at the George Washing- 
ton Hotel until Sunday. The squad 
will be composed of twenty-four play- 
ers, the coach, and the manager. 

C. C. N. Y. is coached by Benny 
Friedman, former Ail-American from 
Michigan, and one of the greatest 
passers of all times. Handicapped by 
a dearth of material this year, he has 
nevertheless managed to get together 
a scrappy team. Satn Romero is a 
shifty broken- field runner while Ed 
Ladenheim provides the backfield with 
a triple-threat man. Linemen who 
have shown up well are George Ale- 
vlzon, tackle, and Ray Von Frank, end. 

Don't be surprised to see the Cru- 
saders go on the field with a revised 
line-up in the backfield. Coach Stagg 
may shift Joe Wos to quarterback, put 
Jack Helm at his old left halfback slot, 
and move Johnny Zuback to the right 
halfback position, keeping Steve Zera- 
vica at fullback. This will provide the 
best lineup possible for substituting 
Larry Isaacs, should he be in condi- 
tion to play. Ken Lyons should re- 
ceive a call for more service than he 
has up to date. 

C. C. N. Y.'s record shows two de- 
feats and a tie against fairly weak 
teams so far this year. This, coupled 
with the fact that Cincinnati won the 
World Series, and that Christmas is 
only sixty-four days away, leaves us to 
pick Susquehanna as the winner. 

Earlier in the season, there was a 
great deal of comment over the stee of 
our squad. Pity poor Benny Fried- 
man, the Beaver's mentor, who recent- 
ly found the grand total of eight men 
out for practice one afternoon! 

Incidentally, the sports writer for the 
newspaper P.M., who recently stated 
that anyone could beat "Susque," is a 
graduate of C. C. N. Y. Didn't some- 
one say "revenge is sweet'??? 




Valenzi, guard on the Indian eleven, 
whose outstanding defense playing 
helped keep Crusaders to a score- 
less tie. 

S 

— Patronize Susquehanna advertisers 

strand 



Extensive Schedule of Games With 
Guest Teams and Program Are In 
Preparation for November Second 



Tuesday, November 2, Susquehanna 
University will be hostess to several 
visiting hockey teams who will be here 
for the Annual Hockey Play Day. The 
visiting teams will be from Cedar Crest, 
Shippensburg, and Lebanon Valley, and 
about sixteen girls are expected from 
each college. 

Each year a Hockey Play Day is held 
at one of these schools. Last year it 
was held at Shippensburg and this 
year It is Susquehanna's turn to play 
hostess. Miss Shure and the girls in 
W. A. A. are working hard to make the 
Play Day a big success and the pro- 
gram thus far is as follows: 

10:00— Registration of teams 

10:30— Games 

12:30 — Lunch and program in Dining 

Room 
2:15— Games 
4:00— Tea 
The team which will represent Sus- 
quehanna has not yet been chosen but 
no matter who is on the team their 
biggest aim will be to beat Cedar Crest, 
which, so far, they have not been suc- 
cessful in doing. Miss Shure and all 
the girls are looking forward to No- 
vember 2 and are hoping to make it a 
big day. 

S 



FRESHMAN CLASS MEETS; HEARS 
OF REJECTION OF DANCE PLANS 



The Freshman Class held a very 
short meeting at 12:45 o'clock, Friday 
in Steele Science Hall. At this meet- 
ing the freshmen were informed that 
no Freshman Party will be held. 



Frosh Eleven Overruns 
Bond and Key in Touch 

For the second time this season, the 
freshman touch football team downed 
the Bond and Key fraternity six, 6 to 
0. The hard-fought game was played 
Wednesday, October 16. Bond and 
Key threatened seriously for three 
quarters to ruin the championship- 
bound frosh, but the class of '44 was 
not to be denied in the closing min- 
utes. 

After a continued exchange of punts 
throughout the greater part of the 
second half, Roy Gutshall, on the end 
of a lateral pass, tossed a neat for- 
ward to Dave Lohman, a play which 
set the ball in position for the decisive 
blow. A few plays later, Stuard Flick- 
inger flipped a lateral to Glenn Schuel- 
er, who in turn tossed a forward to 
Ralph Brown in the end zone. This 
play carried approximately 40 yards 
and turned the trick. Bond and Key 
made a desperate bid in the closing 
seconds, but failed. 

The freshmen used two teams al- 
ternately, while Bond and Key's line- 
up remained intact throughout the en- 
tire fray. 

The win, third in four starts for the 
frosh, set the stage tor the all im- 
portant game to be played with Phi 
Mu Delta on Wednesday, October 23. 
It no doubt will be one of those "do 
or die" affairs and will settle all ques- 
tion as to the '40 touch football cham- 
pion. 

The players on the winning freshman 
team were as follows: Dave Lohman, 
Ralph Brown, Bill Jansen, Roy Gut- 
shall, Glenn Schueler, Ray Eskels, 
Stuard Flicklnger, Marlin Bollinger, 
Ray Hochstuhl, Jim Howell, and Frank 
Addlnger. 

Members of the Bond and Key team 
included: Clyde Sechler, George Bant- 
ley, Jerry Startzel, Melvin Jones, 
George Herman, Alan Parcells and 
John Wolfe. 



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CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsjrove 



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Sandwiches— Hot Beef. Ham. Eg;/ 

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R I 



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Gail Page 

in 

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MONDAY, TUESDAY AND 

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OCTOBER 28 TO 30 

Don Ameche 
Betty Grable 

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THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND 

SATURDAY 

OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 1-2 

Gary Cooper 
Walter Brennan 

"The Westerner" 



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SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Deanna Durbin 
Robert Cummings 

"Spring Parade" 

FRIDAY 

Lana Turner 
John Shelton 

"We Who Are 
Young" 

SATURDAY 

Roy Rogers 
George Hayes 

"The Ranger and 
The Lady" 

MONDAY 

Pat O'Brien 
Frances Farmer 

"Flowing Gold" 

TUESDAY 

Anne Shirley 

"Anne of Windy 
Poplars" 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

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Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

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411 Market St., S'-nbrry, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 

The ^exail Sicn 

Reentered Dru» Store 
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STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 



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Hardware Stores 

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Personally Selected 

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Walnut Street. Sellnserove. Pa. 



B. K. W. IUAC1I LINE 

Tries to give the College Student* 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SEL1NSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940 



Yost Elected Prexy for Girls Muster Strength 
Student Recital Class For Combat in Hockey 



REGISTRATION RECALLS 
DRAFTS OF LAST WAR 



Students' Recital Class held its first 
Informal meeting Monday, October 21, j 
at 4:15. An election of officers preced- 
ed the program. They are: 
Lois Yost, president; Ralph Wolfgang, 
vice president; June Hendricks, secre- 
tary; Louise Mc Williams, treasurer; 
and Charles Reichley, monitor. 

Program 

1 . Piano— "June" Llnd 

Ruth Schwenk 
2 song— "My Heart and the Rain"— 
Neidlinger 

Elizabeth Walters 

3. Song— "O Lord Most Holy"— C. 
Franck 

Franklin Fertig 

4. Piano— "A Canebrake Tune"— Wright 

John Leach 

5. Song— "Bohemian Folk Song" 

Dorothy Artz 

6. Cornet— "Encore Polka" .... Smith 

Eugene Aurand 

7 piano— "Japanese Etude" .. Poldini 

Louise Mc Williams 

8 song— "Melody of My Love"— Ma- 
lotte 

Dorothy Holmes 

9 piano— "Alt-Wien" .... Godowesky 
Jean Bowers 



Hound-Robin Games 



Girls' hockey round-robin begins this 
week according to the notice made by 
Jane Hutchison. The schedule of the 
"nines is as follows: 
Monday, October 21 

3:00 — Juniors - freshmen 

4:15— Seniors - sophomores 
Wednesday, October 23 

3:00 — Juniors - sophomores 

4:15— Seniors - freshmen 
Thursday, October 24 

3:00 — Sophomores - freshmen 

4:15 — Seniors - juniors 

The squads from which the various 
teams will be chosen consist of: 

Seniors : Mendenhall, Bennage, 
Hutchison, Tribby. Smith, Davis, 
Beamenderfer, Miller, Poor b a u g h , 
Reitz. Ritter, Specht, and Reese; 

Juniors: Fenner, Bauman, Heefner, 



• Continued from Page 1) 
ent to support the Army of Occupation 
in Austria at Udine, Capriva, and Gor- 
izio. Those who did not perish in the 
ruins had the privilege of seeing what 
was left of Paris, Versailles, and many 
other cities. 

S 

STUDENTS EXPERIMENT WITH 
POLITICS AMID SPEECHES. 
BANNERS. BALLOTS 



(Continued from Page 2) 
j his display of radio signals, but since 
j he represented the people we can un- 
derstand. 

Mr. Warner spoke first. (Cheer and 
j whistle a la Snerd). He spoke briefly 
i and to the point. He stated that Mr. 
I Willkie wanted to know why the fac- 
| tories were closed on October 12 (radio 
! signal— applause)! He said that in 



Immediately the intelligentsia of Sel- 
insgrove moved toward the polls with 
deliberation. Each person was weigh- 
ing the facts; each wanted to vote 
fairly. The vote was thus: Willkie— 
103, F. D. R.— 39, Snerd— 12, Indepen- 
dent — 2. 

The business society who sponsored 
this mock election, held a short meet- 
ing in Seibert Social Rooms following 
the election. Plans were discussed for 
a probable Skating Party in Novem- 
ber. 



S. C. A. HEARS ABOUT 
WHOLESOME ATTITUDES 



such a crisis as we have today it is 
Unangst. Brand, Schweitzer, Schwenk, j better t0 have a tnlrd Ter m than a 



Forney, Hoover. Williams, Grlesemer, 
and Miller; 

• Sophomores: Chamberlain, Gait, 
Ulsh, Beer, Grothe, Lauver, McCork- 
ill, E. Williamson, Crow, Lamade, 
Welsh, McWilliams, Bowers, and Cox; 

i Freshmen: Crawford, Leffler, Bar- 



10 Song-"The Irish Hills'-Townsley tholomew Soley, Ulrich, Wanser, Zar- 
Ruth Schwenk emba, Trainer, Gordon, Russel, Lamon, 

11. Song "I'll Never Ask You to Tell" Herrold, Frank, and Jacobs. 

C. Fox 

Emanell Whitenight 

12. Piano — "Fantasie-Impromptu" — 
Chopin 

Helen Hocker 

13. Song-'Lullaby" F. Kiel 

Doris Welch 

14. Song— "My Spirit Like a Shepherd 
Boy"— Russell 

Eleanor Lyons 
The Evening Recital will be held in 
Seibert Hall November 4, and the Fac- 
ulty Recital date is November 25. 
S 



"LiF Sis" Will Frolick 
With "Big Sis" on Hike 

There's always something new on the 
campus. Next Saturday afternoon 
around two o'clock is the time set for 
this novelty. At the opening of the 
school year the girls in S. C. A. were 
given "little sisters" whom they were 
to look after during the beginning of 
the term. That idea is being continued 
now and on Saturday, October 26, the 
"big sisters" are to take their charges 
on a hike sponsored by the S. C. A. 

The hike is in charge of Florence 
Reitz, who is the women's president. 
She promises a good time and good 
October refreshments to all those who 
attend. 



New York Alumni Club 
Holds Initial Meeting 

The Susquehanna Alumni Club of 
Metropolitan New York and Northern 
New Jersey will hold its first gathering 

of the year at the George Washington — S 

Hotel, New York City, on Saturday (V lfTm iia Pint) RefirillS: 

following the football game between ^"/P" 8 VHt™ -f/I 1 

Susquehanna and the City College of Welt'Ome NeW Members 

New York. 

Rev. Paul Hoover, '29, president of The first meeting of the Campus 

the New York-Susquehanna Alumni Club was held Wednesday, October 16, 

Club, sent personal announcements to in Seibert parlors. Mrs. Arthur Her- 

over'a hundred Susquehannans resid- man Wilson was hostess for the occas- 

ing in this area. The outstanding fea- sion. The other members of the com- 

ture of the meeting will be a banquet mittee in charge of the meeting were 

in the Colonial Room of the George Mrs. Yorty, Mrs. Scudder, and Mrs. 

Washington Hotel at which Edward Ahl. The new members of the club, 

Dalby, '22, supervising principal of the Miss Jensen, Miss Hein, Mrs. Hatz, 

Marlborough Schools, New York City, and Mrs. Heath, were extended a wel- 

will serve as toastmaster. come into the club by the chairman, 

Other alumni who hold prominent Mrs. Stagg. Mrs. Glauque was ap- 

offices in the club include Anna Nor- Pointed to serve as chairman for the 

wat, '26, secretary, and Roger Blough, November meeting 

Haves Gordon, '26; Rev. This is an organization made up of 



third Rater (Boo!) 

Here again the WwW's held (swing 
and) sway with "Turkey in the Straw" 
—(personally that jug— just a bit off 
key). 

Dramatically Mr. Smith, speaking in 
behalf of Mr. Willkie, took his place 
behind the lectern. At first his words 
were inaudible— there was so much 
cheering (also several boos) and whist- 
ling. This was generally without the 
kind assistance of Mr. Snerd. Finally 
Mr. Smith could be heard. The voters 
listened with intent ears. Smittie made 
four points of importance (if you wish 
,he points, see me). He harped on the 
dea of getting back to the old cus- 
om of swap, and he warned against a 
hird term dictatorship. 
"He'll be coming round the moun- 
tain." Who? Ask me November fifth. 
»fter the cheers, hisses, shouting, 
whistling, and "music" subsided, Mr. 
Corcoran again took the chair and 
this time he called on Mr. Snerd— (he 
prefers Snerd). Says Snerdie: "De 
oeople knows vat dey want so yo' might 
as veil get down thar and vote." P. S. 
Snerdie could think of no more to say. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
place help others to cultivate the bet- 
ter things of life. The third type is 
the person who is "down-in-the- 
dumps," as each one of us is at some 
time or other. There are several ways 
of dealing with this type, but the only 
active and effective method is that un- 
derstanding approach we can make 
with a cheery "Hello," and a bending- 
over-backwards in lending a helping 
hand. 

In closing, Harry led the students in 
pledging that they would "strive to 
their utmost, throughout the whole 
next day, to do unto others as they 
would have others do unto them." 
S 



)f the individual and non such defer- 
ment shall be made of individuals in 

ny plant or institution. An unskilled 
worker in a munitions factory may be 
jasily replaced and thus not eligible 
.'or exemption, while a skilled man in 
i key position in some less essential 
industry may be exempt. 

A limited degree of conscription of 
industry is authorized by the law. Each 

.rm is obligated to accept government 
jrders at a reasonable price and to give 
them preference over all other work, 
if any plant refuses to cooperate in 
these manners, the President may take 
possession of it and have it operated 
by the government at a fair and just 
rental. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



DRAFT ACT DISCUSSED 
AS TO ITS ECONOMIC 
PROVISIONS; IMPLICATIONS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Similar deferment may be made for 
men upon whom other persons are de- 
pendent for support. This classifica- 
tion is determined solely by the status 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32- Y 
STORE 145-Y 



'25, treasurer. 
Russell Auman, '30; and Lawrence 
Dodd. '30, comprise the executive com- 
mittee. 

S 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining" Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 




women of the faculty and wives of fac- 
ulty members. 



K.D.P. Girls Breakfast 
Gait and Russ Address Together in First Social 
Dauphin Co. Teachers 



On Friday, October 18, Or. William 
A. Russ and Dean Russell Gait at- 
tended the Dauphin County Teachers 
institute held at Hershey. Dr. Isaac 
App, county superintendent of Dauph- 
in County, was in charge of the meet- 
ing. 

Dr. Russ addressed the social science 
sections of both the morning and af- 
ternoon sessions. Dr. Gait, addressed 
all the English sections during the 
morning and afternoon sessions. 

Attn that meeting Dr. Russ went to 
Penn Stale to attend the Ninth An- 
nual Convention of the Pennsylvania 



Kappa Delta Phi sorority started off 
their social events for the year with a 
sorority br2akfast held in the sorority 
room on Saturday. October 12, at 7 a. 
m. It was surprising to see how many 
ol the girls succeeded in getting out of 
bed early enough to be there at least 
by 7:15. Even Miss Reed succeeded in 
finding her way down from the Cottage 
through the early morning fog. 

The breakfast was held as the first 
social get-together of the year and Miss 
Jensen, Miss Hein, and Miss Reed were 
the guests. The menu Included: or- 
ange juice, fried ham and eggs, coffee, 
and buns Everybody seemed to con- 
sider the breakfast so much fun that 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove. Pa, 



Historical Association. 

Dr Russ is a member of the Council ««> «hou K ht ^ey would try to get up 
which is the governing body of the as- that early in the morning for another 
lOCiatlon, He was also appointed pro 
gram chairman for the coming vear 



one later on. 



An officeholder b a politic i an who 
ha traded the bunk f« • berth! 



Makes 




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JOS. S. MENTZ 

M Market Square 
Sunbury, Penna. 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
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BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



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lunch refreshing 



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SUNBURY, PENNA. 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological In- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

for Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY. President 



WHITMER-STEELE CO, 

Lumber Manufacturers 



Northumberland, Pa. 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOY8* 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa, 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standarr 
courses: — 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

POUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

'.RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

O. Morris Smith, A.M.. DD., Prea 
Rusyell Oalt. Ph D„ Dean 



Hester Hoffman 
200 N. Broad St. 









Volume XXXXVII. 



To Consider Pan-American Union 
This Year; Gundrum Made Manager; 
Plans Made for Extended Trip 



Highlights 
Of the Week 

Debate Meeting Thursday 

The debate squad will hold its week- 
ly meeting on Thursday afternoon at 
4 p. m. in G. A. 301. There is still an 
opportunity for newcomers to join the 
,quad. 

S. C. A. Service Thursday Evening 

"Our Individual and Group Respon- 
sibility" will be the topic of discussion 
at the S. C. A. meeting Thursday even- 
ing at 6:45 p. m. The meeting will be 
held in Seibert Hall Social Rooms. 

Hockey Play Day Here 

The Susquehanna hockey squad un- 
der Miss Shure will play host to visit- 
ing hockey teams from: Cedar Crest, 
Shippensburg, and Lebanon Valley. 

Crusaders Face Allegheny 

Seeking their fifth victory of the 
season the Susquehanna eleven will 
engage the Allegheny College 'Gators 
in Meadville Saturday. 

Ladies' Auxiliary to Meet 

A mass meeting of all the branches 
Of the Ladies' Auxiliary of Susque- 
hanna University will convene in Sei- 
bert Hall Saturday afternoon at 3 p. m. 

B. C A. Scavenger Hunt 

S. C. A. social events will be con- 
tinued Saturday evening when this 
group will sponsor ■ scavenger hunt 
to leave from Seibert Hall at 7:3C. 
Competitive teams will vie for prizes; 
refreshments will be served to win- 
ners and to losers. 

Pi Gamma Mu Monday 

The third monthly meeting of Pi 
Gamma Mu will feature Dr. Sidney E. 
Bateman who will speak on "Thomas 
A. Edison as I Knew Him." The meet- 
ing will be held in Steele Science 100 
at 7:30; the public is invited. 

Student Evening Recital 

Students of the conservatory will 
present a recital in Seibert Auditorium 
Monday evening at 8:00 p. m 

Phi Kappa to Meet 

The monthly meeting of the Greek 
rhlb will Vv? held Tuesday evening nt 
7 p. m. in G. A., room 205. 
S 

Beta Kappa Entertains 
At "Open House" Party 

Two new members have been added 

Open house was held at Beta Kappa j to the Men's Student Council. Last 
iast Saturday evening, with members | Wednesday morning the general stu- 
and their ladies holding forth at the ; dent body cast their ballots for the 
4UU West Pine street chapter house, i candidates of their choice. Prom a card 
The party started at 7:30 and the even- 1 including Robert Updegrove, Michael 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



Number 12 



Debate Squad Meets; S. U. Invited to Help DEAN GALT INFORMS FR0SH AS TO 
Decides on Question Celebrate Hallowe'en FRATERNITY RUSHING REGULAT0NS 



The debating squad has decided to 
debate the national question, "Resolv- 
ed, that the nations of the Western 
Hemisphere should enter into a perma- 
nent union." 

Charles Gundrum, '43, will serve as 
manager for this year's teams. Profes- 
sor Gilbert announced his appointment 
to the squad, meeting in G. A. 301) last 
Thursday at four. Gundrum acted as 
issistant manager last year. 

The decision to adopt the national 
question was made because most of the 
squad members expressed the desire to 
debate more out of state teams, instead 
of only the traditional Susquehanna 
rivals on the two annual routes the de- 
baters have been taking These have 
been through the western part of 
Pennsylvania, and through the south- 
eastern section of the state, Northern 
Maryland, and New Jersey. 

The question was chosen by the Com- 
mittee on Inter-Association Relations 
of the National Association of Teach- 
ers of Speech. Dr. Charles R. Layton 
of Muskingum College, New Concord, 
Ohio, is chairman of the committee. 

Professor Gilbert read an invitation 
extended by Winthrop College u girls' 
school in South Caiouiu to partici- 
pate in an All-American speech tour- 
nament. Each spring Wlntht'jp holds 
this wiuely known forensic meet. 

Twelvt student* have come out for 
the squad. Thus far, they are G. Ro- 
bert Booth, Harry Thatcher, David 
Keim, Merle Hoover, Fred Warner, 
Lawrence Cady, George MacQuesten, 
John Galski, Pierce Allen Coryell, Fred 
Brubaker, Charles Ague, and Lester 
Yarnall. 

Professor Gilbert declares he would 
like to see more Freshmen interested 
in Debating. 



Susquehanna is Invited t" partici- 
pate with the rest of Selinsgrove in a • 
gigantic Hallowe'en celebration. Thurs- 
day evening. Dean Gait will .stive as 
one of the parade judges, and both the 
college and high school bands will 
march. 

The Board of Directors of the Sel- 
insgrove Community Center has In- HortOII Hall Sllllday 

vited Susquehanna University to again 

join in the annual local celebration 
which consists, in the main, of a cos- 
tume parade through the central sec- 
tions of town. 

The judges, among whom will be 
Dean Gait, will award prizes tor the 
largest adult group in costume, the 
most original make-ups, the best- ! worship services, 
dressed couple, etc. College students ! visit of last year 
and organizations are eligible for these | traveled to Red Lion. 

• Jrlzes - Alter dinner, which was had by spe 

Parade participants must register be- , cial arrangement with the school au 



Rushing Season to Extend from November 26 
to December 11 With December 13 Pledging 
Date; Last Year's Methods to be Followed 

- (ft 

Seventy Visitors Dine In 



The Men's Bible class of the Reform- 
ed church at Red Lion was entertain- 
ed to dinner in Horton Hall by the 
same group of St. Paul's Evangelical 
and Reformed church Sunday after- 
noon. The Red lion class visited St. 
Paul's Sunday school and morning 
returning a similar 
when the local class 



thorities. Professor Brungart took the 
approximately seventy visitors on a 
tour of the campus. Later Mr. Miles 
Herrold, superintendent of St. Paul's 
Sunday school, took them for a visit 
to the State Epileptic Colony. 

Dr. George F. Dunkelberger is the 
teacher of the Men's Bible Class of St. 
Pauls church. 



Updegrove and Haas to 
Sit on Student Council 



fore six p. m., Thursday, parade day, 
at Rea .v Derick's Drug Store, Stef- 
fen'S Grocery Store, or Weutzel's De- 
partment Store. The marchers, must 
first have their costumes approved by 
the marshal or one of his staff before 
entering the parade. 

The list of prizes thus far Is as fol- 
lows: the largest number of costumed 
adults as a group— fifteen dollars; the 
largest group of juniors in line, ten---- ,. j Tt/i«ii 

iollars; the second largest group of IjHUlCniSOn VHKl Miller 
luniors, five dollars; the most original | 
make up, male or female, five dollars; 
the second most original makeup, two 
dollars; the best dressed couple, five 
dollars; the second best, dressed couple 
two dollars; the best impersonator of 
a popular comic strip, five dollars; the 
second best, two dollars. 



At S. G. Conference 



Last Friday and Saturday Jane 
Hutchison, president of Women's Co- 
operative Council, and Elaine Miller 



Twenty prizes of one dollar each will j visited Grove && College, where they 
i awarded to children with outstand- attended the Tri-State Intercollegiate 



ing was spent dancing to such masters ' 
as Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, and 
Glen Gray via a new combination 
radio and record player. Some guests 
who, perhaps, had ascended Mahanoy 
with the Biemic Society and were tir- 
ed, preferred to play cards. Others did 
well at that ancient game called ping 
pong. 

Bob Booth, well-known impersonat- 
or, made a great hit with the assemb- 
lage in the roles of various campus 
characters. Another high spot of the 
evening was the serving of refresh- 
ments at 9:30, consisting of sand- 
wiches, ice cream, and sweet cider. 

One of the well-known guests was 
Jack Shipe, who made the pilgrimage 
from his home in Herndon. Mr. Dan- 
iel Reitz acted as chaperon. 

When the party broke up at 10:30 
1 • ryone seemed loath to leave. Much 
credit was given to Neil Fisher who, as 
social chairman, was largely respons- 
ible for the success of the party. 

This was one of the quota of open 
house parties arranged by eacli of the 
fraternities during the year. 



Wolf, Paul Lantz, and Melvin Haas, 
two men were chosen. Robert Upde- 
U'ove will represent the senior class, 
and Melvin Haas will represent the 
junior class. 

The two new members were necessary 
ueeause of the growing non-fraternity 
group. Henceforth the Council will con- 
sist of two men from each fraternity 
and two from the non-fraternity fac- 
tion, giving representation to all the 
men. 

S 

Former Crad Given 
Post In Local Bank 

Laird Geniberling, a graduate of 
Susquehanna in the class of 1933, was 
ecently made a director of the First 
National Bank at Selinsgrove. 

While attending Susquehanna Uni- 
versity, Geniberling was editor oi THE 
SUSQUEHANNA. He is also a gradu- 
ate oi the Temple University Law- 
School at Philadelphia, and a leader 
oi the Young Republicans Club in this 
area. 



Barked Shins and Parched Throats 
Mark Conquest of Mt. Mahanoy 



"Johnny on the spot" has scooped 
another '.250 words, ijust malting the 
deadline), with the thirty-three star 
final which was staged on the site of 
Mahanoy Mountain. 

Transportation via modern means 
Was temporarily abandoned, even Scud- 
Uer's "Old Faithful" gave up; and re- 
sort was made to nature's supply of 
leather express. (Pifflel the re- 
mainder of this epic will be presented 
!•' Kaleidoscopic fashion since my 
ijuota of space is scanty and the statis- 
tics are bulging.) 

Puff, puff, going up! Li'l Nell and 
Jimmy Scudder took more steps than 
Frou-Frou could count, (especially 
since he has to use his lingers.) After 
Inflniteamal lime had elapsed, the 

draggling group of professed woods- 
men reached the top, where they were 



hauled up. hand over hand, by Thatch- 
er, who proceeded to tantiUw their 

scorching tongues by barking. "Ice cold 
POP, live OenU a bottle " 

Dr. Houtl and Mary Lee detected. 
through the binoculars, a button miss- 
ing on the sleeve of Coxcy's wash hang- 
ing out behind the cottage. 

The trail back led, for the more ad- 
vent tiresome souls, down a slope Which 
was quite wealing on Mr. Kelly's nether 
garments; but both he and Doctor 
Fisher maintained an optimistic point- 

i of-view. especially when they witnessed 
the lovely panorama that was displayed 

from the vantage point of the cliffs, 

This noble band was courageously led 
by ••Trail-Blazer." president Joe, who 
added bits ut enthusiasm with war 
whoops in full-Hedged Indian manner. 
(Continued on Page 4» 



be 

ing costumes. Twenty fifty-cent prizes 
will be given to noteworthy children. 
Other prizes will be announced later, 
as the prize money is contributed. 

known before the parade. 
S 

Organizations Plan for 
Decorating Contest as 
Homecoming Day Nears 

Susquehanna's leaf laden campus 
and halls of intellectual endeavors will 
again echo and re-echo with the sounds 
and activities of what is expected to 
be a great homecoming of graduates 

One of the decided improvements 
over preceding years is the new com- 
petitive decorative scheme. By this 
plan each dormitory, fraternity house. 
and sorority, plus the honor cottage 
on University Heights, will decorate to 
•heir own satisfaction with their own 
ideas. 

The results of these artistic attempts 
are then to be judged by a committee 
i Of three, President Smith, Dean Gait, 
and Dean Jensen. 

Formerly, any attempts at campus 
decoration were made by a group of 
vandalsi prototype, a barbarian tribe) 
and they proceeded to turn Susque- 
hanna's campus into something which 
nearly resembled ■ city dump. 

Various organizations will hold din- 
ners and meetings and many outstand- 
ing events arc scheduled for the week- j 
end. A pep jamboree will be held on 
Friday evening at seven o'clock in the I 
lUumnl Oymnaslum with members of; 
old football teams giving talks, follow- 
ed by a torch parade and a bontire. 

On Saturday morning at l:M a. m 
there will be the traditional freshman- 
sophomore football game. At 10:0U a 
m. there will be an all-star hockey 
mat eh. At 12:15 p. in. there will be 
an alumni luncheon in Horton dining 
room. Finally at 2:00 p. m. the high- 
light of this exciting day will be the 

grid game between Susquehanna and 
Moravian; both teams have had an 
undefeated season to date 

The Grand Finale will be the fra- 
ternity Homecoming Dances m the 
evening. 

S 



iate 
Gov 
were 



Conference of Women's Student 
eminent. Twenty-two colleges 
represented. 

The conference opened with regis- 
tration on Friday at t.wo O'clock In the 
beautiful Mary A. Pew Dormitory. A 
tea followed in Crawford Hall, the Ad- 
ministration building. Friday's activi- 
ties were climaxed with a formal ban- 
quet at which time the theme of the 
Conference, "Reaching For the Stars," j 
was carried out by the speakers. An 
entertainment followed the banquet I 
alter which the girls left for their dor- j 
mitories. 

Saturday morning the conference 

opened with a general meeting. At 

9:30 round table discussions were 

i Continued on Page 4i 

S 



Dean Gait called the men of the 
freshman class m a special meeting in 
Which he set forth the rules and regu- 
lations with respect to the new frat- 
ernity rushing set up. 

On November 1 those wishing to be 
rushed by a fraternity will signify their 
desire by tilling out the required form 
in the registrar's office and returning 
same together with the rushing fee of 

$1.00 

On November 26 rushing begins. This 
period extends until December 11 dur- 
ing which time freshmen will be given 
the opportunity to inspect thoroughly 
each of the three fraternities and to 
participate in the activities as spon- 
sored by the fraternity groups. 

A quiet period will be observed on 
December 12 during which time no up- 
per class-men will be permitted to dis- 
cuss fraternity with those being rush- 
ed. The purpose of this period is to 
enable the rushees to be alone with 
their thoughts in making their decis- 
ion. The smokers will be held on the 
evenings of December 9-10-11 and the 
festivities will be brought to a climax 
on December 13, the date of pledging. 

Dean Gait emphasized the fact that 
one should not consider joining a fra- 
ternity without the expenditure of 
some money. In addition to the in- 
itial pledge fee of $1.00, a fee amount- 
ing to $15.00 is charged to each pledgee 
for the first year. One half of this 
fee is required on the day of pledging. 

The administration is hopeful that 
this plan might run harmoniously and 
that the various fraternities and fresh- 
men will endeavor to cooperate in this 
ittempt to create a btttei fecLng 
among the fraternities at Susque- 
hanna. 



F. B. I. Ag-ent Advocates 
Youth Guidance in Talk 



Announce Tryouts for 
"Kind Lady" Tonight 

Tryouts for "Kind Lady" will be held 
tonight at seven in the play produc- 
tion room, G. A. 300, announces Mr. 
Kelley, head of the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity Theatre Guild. 

"Kind Lady." a sinister-peopled play 
adapted by Edward Chodorov from a 
itory by Hugh Walpole, is about a 
nlddle-aged woman who mistakenly 
jefriencied B very bad painter. The 
winter's wife and friends descend on 
he house- m droves, Imprisoning the 

'kind lads," whose friends are told 
Jhe has gone away. This the story of 

her Imprisonment, and efforts at es- 
cape. 

Kind Lady was flTSt produced on 
Broadway live years ago, with Qrace 
George in the starring role, and cur- 
rently on Broadway in a revival. 



Mr. E. R. Davis, special agent of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, spoke 
to the meeting of the Selinsgrove Tri- 
angle Club on Thursday evening in 
Seibert Hall. 

Mr. Davis stated that America's 
most urgent need was the realisation 
of responsible adult leaders to the fact 
that they are needed in the guidance 
■and supervision of youth in such or- 
ganizations as the Boy and Girl Scouts. 
This is mainly due to the fact that a 

: tremendous amount of the crime com- 
mitted in America is perpetrated by 
young men and women under twenty- 

I five years of age. 

In his introductory statements, Mr. 

j Davis mentioned how the F. B. I. is 
acting to prevent sabotage and BtpiOD- 

: age and that the bureau appreciates 
" | 'lumber of letters Horn Amer- 
ican citizens giving information about 
suspicious actions or people. He said 
that the Dies Committee is responsible 
to and working for Congress, but when- 
ever case.-, arise wherein the F. B. I. 
ma) operate, these are reported and 
lnv< atigated immediately. 

After his lecture, the meeting was 
Opened to a forum during which he 

i answered several questions. 



Crusaders Witness Spectacles of 
Broad it ay and World's Fair 



On th< 
boys 



twenty-sixth <i<\ oi October 
from old B U. not only con- 
C. 



HOMECOMING ISSUE FRIDAY 

The next issue ot THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA will appear next Friday, in- 
stead ot on Tuesday H regularly 

scheduled This change has been 

made so that the homecoming issue 
may carry last minute news of the 
events of Homecoming Day Copies 
of this issue will be distributed to 
the returning alumni. 



tin 

quered the Beavers oi O. C. N. Y. but 

they entered into a Wholesale onslaught 

of the bm city. Toward evening the 

first division arrived by train, this 

group dusted off the hotel and pre- 
pared the city lor the expected arrival. 

Along about eight-thim In the even- 
ing the main bod', attacked using some 

ot the meet modern tactics ot 'Blitz- 



krieg" war. 

1 ioU'I | he DO] I 

exploring, som 
been to the be 



Alter getting si I at the 

s decided to do a little 

ot tin boys inui never 

building i ectoi kx foi e, 

are was 



Times Sq 



and tiie first view of 
indeed a thrill 

On the Great White Waj we had 

some oi the best hits of the current 
on, for instance the Strand was 



mowing "Knute Rockne AU American 

coupled with Woody Herman's band 
MOfil ot the fellOWl thought tins was 
the best combination and took It in. 
ome of the Qnt hand jokes, you 
can ask Coach PritChard, he can't get 
OVer them, Corcoran can give \ou 

some tirst hand Information os the 
communist viewpoint, (or he spent the 
evening on Union square arguing with 

one oi tiie boys For Brat hand In- 
formation about the shops on Fifth 

Avenue shoot the questions to Nale. 

he did all the buying 

Alter the game most ot the boys had 
tickets to the Fair at Flushing Mea- 
dows. Although the evening was cold 
the attendance was still In the three 

hundred thousands. All in all you can 

quote the boya as saying "We cant 
wait to get back." 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same Doing the regularly stated 
intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 



Subsciiption $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42, Circulation Manager 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 



Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 



As its contribution to a bigger Homecoming Day THE SUS- 
QUEHANNA will release next week's issue on Friday evening 
instead of on Tuesday; extra copies will be on hand for distri- 
bution to our guests of the day. 

Many students and faculty members will have a part in 
one or more of the events of the day; everyone will have a part 
in making our guests feel welcome. Let's all join in making 
this Susquhanna's biggest Homecoming Day. 



Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc.. 
College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sporis Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle 
Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella FetherofI, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjoiie Wolfe, '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, 
'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; ^Catherine 
Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, 
'43 ; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer, '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane 
Shotts, '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Fred Warner 
Advertising Managers j Chester Shusta 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, '43; Rex Sunday, '43; Dorothy Webber, 
'43; Charles Ague, '44; Ralph Brown. '44; Jean Buffing ton, '44; Susanne 
Goyne, '44; Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; 
Lois Krammer, '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. 

Faculty auvIsois: Eunoiial, Dr. a. ti. Wnson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reltz. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



"CRAMITIS" EPIDEMIC 



A LETTER TO THE FRESHMAN MEN 

Dean Gait has announced to the freshmen that the fra- 
ternity rushing season is to begin soon. For those of you who 
are anticipating fraternal affiliations this announcement means 
the beginning of "good times;" foi the Fraternity Senate it 
means another test for the new system of fraternity govern- 
ment set up last year. 

Our wish is that each freshman man may, first of all, set 
himself straight on whether or not he will become a "fraternity 
man." This is a problem of importance and should not be tak- 
en lightly. Do you have the money? Do you wish to live in a 
fraternity house? Can you "keep straight" while living there, 
or are you like to be too easily led by the desires of the broth- 
ers? Do you like the spirit of brotherhood, as found in fratern- 
ities here, or could you do better without such affiliation? Will 
•fraternity life help you develop into a well-rounded personality? 
Are you able to reconcile your parents to your decision? If after 
considering these issues you are convinced that you wish to 
consider fraternity life, then sign up and pay your rushing fee. 

Your greatest decision still remains. Which one of the 
three houses should you pledge? If only one hou&e is rushing 
you it will be easy to decide; but the chances are strong that 
more than one house will invite you to join. Then you face a 
grave and weighty decision — one which should be made in the 
quiet of your own room, away from the heat of the campaign. 

The bases upon which your decision should be made are 
many; each year students make the big mistake of considering 
only a few of them. Ask yourself such questions as the follow- 
ing; see which house rates highest in your estimation. Do you 
like the type of person who is TYPICAL of this fraternity? Is 
he the type of man whom you should enjoy taking to your home? 
Will you enjoy and profit from having this sort of person as 
your intimate friend during your college life? Ho wmuch sham 
friendliness has this person used to impress you and to get you 
to join? Are these men rushing you because they want you as 
a brother or because they feel that you would be an "asset" to 
their fraternity? 

Can you subscribe in principle to the ideals of this fratern- 
ity, as you have been able to detect them? How much import- 
ance do you place on the size and off-campus affiliations of the 
fraternity? What is your opinion of the house, and what is its 
financial condition? Does this fraternity compare iavorably in 
costs with the others? Has this fraternity, to the best of your 
knowledge, used unfair methods in securing pledges? Will you 
be able to help the fraternity, and will you gain l'rom having 
been a member? 

We believe that if each freshman man considers these fac- 
tors carefully before making his decision, there will be fewer 
errors in judgment than there have been in past yars 

S 

TO A BIGGER HOMECOMING 

As the homecoming season comes round again and as the 
plans for a bigger celebration take form should we not, as in- 
dividuals, consider how best we can do our bit in making the 
day a really big event in the Susquehanna year? In past years 
a considerable number of the students, taking advantage of 
the holiday, have left the campus. This takes away a certain 
element of college atmosphere which the alumni enjoy so much 
and tends to make them feel only a passive welcome. With 
this in mind could we not arrange to stay and join in the cele- 
bration? 

As the plans Indicate the homecoming will be one of the 
biggest events Susquehanna has witnessed in recent years. The 
campus will have decorations ol a different tone this year as 
the various residences vie lor decorating honors. The alumni 
office forecasts that the number of returning grads may exceed 
five hundred. The fraternity celebrations during the evening 
will feature events out of the ordinary. 



Ol' Doc Pedagogy has been having 
a very busy weeic because the recurrent 
nine weeks plague, tnat dreaded Cram- 
itis Epidemic, is waging in all the hor- 
rible aesoiauon wnicn one associates 
so often with the measles. 

Whenever an epidemic occurs in such 
a small community as Selinsgrove, one 
of the first prominent signs is that of 
the quarantine notices wnich are past- 
ed on the aoors of those sick witn the 
disease. Such a quarantine sign is the 
sight of many red, bleary eyes and 
aiooping eyelids on students wno, in 
aaaition, may exhibit a tousled head 
ana a slight dizziness. 

When tne measles go the rounds, 
little Mary and her playmate, Sue, fall 
victims to its power and they are out 
of senool for several weeks. Now, when 
the cramitis fever seizes the students, 
they often miss classes, even though 
they might actually be marked present 
by the teacher. If a vacant seat doesn't 
testify to the fact that Johnny is sick, 
then the all-too-revealing vacant stare 
is the only reply the teacher may re- 
ceive to the question he has directed 
to the over-loaded head of Johnny. 
Swarms of microbes, in various shapes 
and forms of data, are floating around 
in the cranial cavity which at this 
period should be diligently occupied 
with the business of the subject at 
hand. 

As in the case of measles, so In the 
case of this ravaging fever, there is an 
incubation period dating from the day 
on which the examination period is an- 
nounced about two weeks prior to the 
exam. Then, the night before the 
exam, while the patient seems still 
normal, he attends the latest show at 
the Stanley, and without any signs of 
the impending danger returns to the 
dorm, safe and sound (presumably). 

At ten o'clock the dormant germs 
begin to warm up while Johnny gets 
into a bull session where seven-eighths 
oi the discussion is gossip and one- 



eighth is study. Fatigue and head- 
aches begin to torment the poor lad 
while he stubbornly insists that he Is 
quite well and only need an aspirin or 
two taken simultaneously with large 
cups of coffee, preferably black. Na- 
turally he disregards the helpful ad- 
vice about "hitting the hay early" to 
thereby ward off the disease and even- 
tually he snatches a few moments of 
broken rest after three in the morn- 
ing. 

By seven the disease may have pro- 
gressed to such a stage that Johnny 
can't appear at breakfast, but should 
he attempt to continue a semblance 
of health he will arrive at the table 
only to discover that his appetite has 
fled in the face of the delirium which 
now sets in. This delirium manifests 
itself in the form of a battery of ques- 
tions and facts which are fired in a 
gibberish, hodge-podge manner back 
and forth across the white table-cloth 
of "no man's land." 

By this time Johnny is almost a 
hopeless case, but very determined to 
carry the flag to the last ditch, (which 
is about all he can accomplish). He 
enters the examination room and re- 
ceives the paper of questions and then 
passes into the final stage of the dis- 
ease, that of complete unconsciousness. 
For the duration of the exam period, 
he remains in this frightful state and 
departs a pitiful ghost of his former 
exuberant self. 

The after results of the sickness are 
at times as disastrous as the crisis be- 
cause Johnny may emerge, partially, 
from the coma and encounter his best 
girl. Not having had the proper 
amount of beauty sleep, he isn't tops 
with his flattery and may end up in 
a spat with Mary. (Alas — ain't it the 
truth!) 

Now, there are the facts about the 
horrors of the epidemic which awaits 
you. You are the doctor! 
S 



"JOE AESOP SPEAKS" 



Once upon a Time there was a 
Freshman named Arlington, who, not 
too strangely, became Enamored of a 
lavishing Senior whose real name was 
Mehitable but whom everyone called 
Mettle, for Short. 

Now, Mettie really liked the Poor 
Fellow but she Knew her Public Opin- 
ion—especially when it came to the 
Freshman Girls. And who was she, 
Mettie, to esteem so lightly their 
Friendship what with May Day only- 
six months away? 

Nay, forsooth! Arlington must be 
discouraged. 

But Arlington was a tough custom- 
er. No matter what she did, he Liked 
it. 

She told him lie was tToo Young. 
Arlington didn't even resent it. 

She tried ignoring him. That 
didn't work either. 

She went out with Other Men. She 
returned his Gifts. She attempted to 
tell him, tactfully, that they should be 



Just Friends. 

It availed her nothing. Arlington 
stuck. 

Mettie was in Despair. 

"Lookit," her Roommate point out. 
"If the Sap takes all That, then It 
must be the Real Thing! Why don't 
you Go Out With Him?" 

That very evening Arlington tele- 
phoned. He asked Mettie if she would 
go with him to see "Third Toe, Left 
Foot," starring Burna Loy. his favor- 
ite actress. 

"I'd love to," she warbled. I'll be 
down 'toute de suite'!" 

She heard Arlington Gasp. 

"Mettie!" he exclaimed Agrily, "I 
have taken a Lot from you, but this is 
the Last Straw. I will not be called 
vicious names!" 

He Hung Up. 

Mettie staggered back to her Room 
and became Hysterical. 

Moral: A Fool and his Honey are 
Soon Parted. -Joe Aesop. 



ff 



ODDS 'N ENDS 



)) 



Stuff 

To all you poor suckers who have 
never won in an Irish Sweepstakes; 
your time has come!! Tuesday is the 
day oi the biggest sweepstakes that 
America has ever known. There will 
be no casii prize*, and no consolation 
prizes, but watch how lucky you are 
The put lues oi* the K. D. P. In- 
itiation ot last year can be had for a 
nominal tee Boy, you should see 
Fern! 1 1 . . . Orchids to the Crusaders 
for their showing on Saturday ... Of 
all tin- miss on Die other team, why- 
did Dick Mat i hewi have to pick the 
boxing champ oi the achool for a one- 
round playmate? . . Roger's Rangers 
took to the hills again as Major Scud- 
tJtf and family led them thru, and up 
Hit- lever ridden jungles of Mt. Maha- 
lioy. Is it true that young Miss Bm- 
iiakti was so tired she wanted to roll 
bark down the mountain? This "Perry- 
boat Serenade." Some tune. Especially 
by the King Sisters. That part that 
got* "'Una. Una, Una." Very popular 
number, Play Day on Saturday. Come 
out and cheer our gals on. We MUST 
beat those Cedar Cresters. End quote. 
. . . S. U. goes Modern!! Some of the 
"boys" are actually dating two rhler- 
ent girls and getting away with it. 
Showes to see— "Wyoming" and "Cap- 



tain Caution." Pet abhorrences— Spin- 
ach, fried onions, chamber music, Gene 
Autry, dentists, fat assignments in con- 
Junction with tests, Paramount Pictor- 
ials, Chester Gump, and eight o'clock 
classes . . . Bill Gehron, "40," tells me 
to watch "When You Awake" take high 
money. Tommy Dorsey does it to the 
queen's taste, and Bill's right; it's go- 
ing up. "Falling Leaves" by Glenn 
Miller is quite seasonal and quite good. 
Many thanks, Bill. Letter soon. T. 
Dorsey will give 100 smackers to any- 
one who gives him a good tune. 
There'! your chance to take care of 
part of next year's tuition. ... Up to 
the present time, my average on foot- 
ball prognostication is .5625. Is that 9 
out of 16? I ain't ashamed. In fact, 
I'll try again. F. & M. over Albright. 
Boy, do I take chances!! Susquehanna 
knocks off Allegheny by three touch- 
downs. Brown tops Yale, Northwestern 
over Minnesota and don't ask me why. 
Syracuse over Georgetown. Am I 
crazy?? Don't answer that question. 
My greatest desire right now is to have 
an action picture of the coach when 
the Zeravica to Zuback combine click- 
ed for those two passes. That sound 
he made was "Hoky Smoke." 

Olive Oyl. 



MAY WE . . 
. . SUGGEST 

TUESDAY 

Anne of Windy Poplars 

Here is a sharp contrast to most 
contemporary shows. Anne Shirley 
stars as "Anne Shirley," a young school 
teacher whose persistent friendliness 
and sweetness eventually triumph over 
the malice and envy of the small town 
in which she finds her first job. The 
plot covers the period of one school 
year which is filled with those small 
incidents of large significance that take 
real acting ability to put across. 

It's only lately that some smart pro- 
ducers have decided that there might 
be something to filming the plot and 
spirit of a good novel as well as the 
tide; R. K. O. has done just that in 
"Anne cf Windy Poplars." There has 
been no streamlining of the plot, no 
modernLing of the story; and the re- 
liance is upon appeal to sentiment and 
emotion thruout. 

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
Foreign Correspondent 

Joel McCrea and Laraine Day are 
featured in this job and Bob Benchley 
has a good (but too short) part. Mc- 
Crea is sent by a New York paper to 
replace their London correspondent 
and from the moment of his arrival he 
is waist deep in intrigue and adven- 
ture. A peace leader is kidnaped by a 
foreign government (guess who) and 
our hero is right on the trail. It's 
rather tough that he has to fall in 
love with the good-looking daughter of 
the arch villain, but as things turn out 
an Atlantic Clipper is shot down and 
a. v. makes the supreme sacrifice— 
saving everyone on board. McCrea 
marries the g. 1. d. and in the final 
scene he broadcasts a message to 
America from the midst of a London 
blackout. 

FRIDAY 
Hired Wife 

Secretary-boss comedy in the best 
traditions. Briane Aherne is a cement 
magnate whose only weakness is for 
blondes, every spring. Rosalind Rus- 
sel is right in the groove as the super- 
efficient secretary who tries to keep 
her boss for ruin as he tries to get 
Virginia Bruce to pose for the front 
of a concrete bag. Her loyalty even 
goes as far as having her marry the 
boss when his company is about to go 
on the rocks— of course the marriage 
is nothing personal and it is even quite 
annoying until the two principals fall 
in love. 

SATURDAY 
Triple Justice 

Here's your Saturday night saga of 
the sagebrush, boys. Lots of shooting, 
riding, and all the trimmings; and to 
make it a little different George 
O'Brien gets himself hitched before the 
fadeout. Get there early to avoid the 
rush and don't stamp your feet or the 
usher will toss you out on your ear. 

MONDAY 
Doomed to Die 

It should have been doomed to die 
before it ever left the cutting room. 
Boris Karloff is the amaring Mr. Wong 
who solves murder, settles tong wars, 
and makes strong men sleep like 
babies. 

TUESDAY 

The Man Who Talked Too Much 

The story of the assistant D. A. who 
becomes the mouthpiece for an under- 
world gang is convincingly told with 
Geome Brent as ton billing. Brent 
took the job in order to send his young- 
er brother to school; and after the 
boy graduates, he turns inc-imina ting- 
evidence over to the government con- 
cerning the boss cf the gang. Brent 
saves his brother from a framed mur- 
der charge and incldently does one 
fine bit of acting in that final court- 
room scene. 

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
City for Conquest 

If it were not for James Cagney and 
Ann Sheridan this picture mi'iht have 
been just another cornev tear-jerker. 
Cagney is the lad from the East Side 
who seeks fame in the prize ring and 
Miss Sheridan is out to conquer the 
city with her dancing. Comes the end 
with Cagney, punch-drunk and prac- 
tically blind, realising that his con- 
quest of the city has been through the 
fine music which he has helped his 
younger brother create. 

FRIDAY 

Dr. Kildare Goes Home 

If you've seen one Dr. Kildare pic- 
ture you've seen them all. In this one 
the doctor goes back to his home town 
and opens a dime-a-week clinic; the 
townspeople scoff, but he saves a boy's 
life and when the picture ends every- 
body is happy. Except me. 






TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PA. 












PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<t>- 



They Are Likely to Give Trouble Saturday 




Unbeaten Crusaders 
Drill for Allegheny 



Co-captains Clarke Saylor and Ralph Marasco have shouldered a lot of the 
responsibility of building up the numerical strength and morale of the 
1940 squad. Saylor, a senior, commands the Allegheny defenses from the 
center position. Marasco, a junior, directs the 'Gator attack, calling sig- 
nals from the fullback post. 



B1LLIANT PASSING FEATURED IN 
SATURDAY'S VICTORY OVER C. C. N. Y. 



Fresh from their victory over C. C. 
N. Y. last Saturday, the Crusaders will 
play their last away game against Alle- 
gheny College at Meadville this week- 
jend. This will be the second gridiron 
tussle between the two schools, rela- 
tions having started last year with 
Susquehanna taking the opener, 20-0. 

The "Gators," coached by Carl J. 
Lawrence, have a small squad, but were 
fortunate in having nine lettermen 
around which to build a team this fall. 
Pour of these are backfield men while 
the other Ave play on the line. These 
veterans have been supplemented by 
several promising players from last 
year's freshman team. In Co-Captain 
Ralph Marasco and George Hartwell, 
Allegheny has a pair of capable backs, 
while Co-Captain Ray Saylor and Gil 
i_ong do yoeman's work on the line. 

With Larry Isaacs back in shape, 
the Orange and Maroon football ma- 
chine should be ready to go places In 
the coming scrap. Steve Zeravica and 
Johnny Zuback, the boys who showed 
up so well in the C. C. N. Y. game, are 
expected to give their usual stellar per- 
formances. The lack of injuries in the 
last game should also aid the Cru- 
saders. 

Allegheny has played four games this 

season. Allegheny has lost four games 

; this season. This leads one to deduct 

that Susquehanna's undefeated string 

will continue. 

Glancing at the fates of our future 
opponents this past weekend, we find 
that Allegheny lost to Hiram 28-0, 
while Moravian trampled Hartwick, 
36-0; both these teams are on the Cru- 
sader card for coming games. 



Cruspders Defeat the Lavender in Last Period 
Rally to Bring" Home 14-7 Victory; Zeravica to 

Zuback Combination Results in Both Tallies 

<<►> - _ 

Two long final period passes which ShinCS ?.t Tackle Post 

caught the City College of New York 
defense napping, enabled the Susque- 
hanna University football team to stay 
among the nation's unbeaten teams, as 
the Crusaders took a 14-7 decision be- 
fore 3000 fans in Lewisohn Stadium 
N. Y., Saturday. 

Although Bennny Fri?dman's men 
rolled up seven first downs in the first 
half, the homesters failed to get closer 
than the Crusader's 22 yard marker, 
from which point an attempted field 
goal fell short. A break on a f ambled 
punt gave Susquehanna the ball on 
City College's twenty, late in the op- 
ening canto, but running plays were 
stopped cold and Heaton's attempted 
placement was short. Midway in the 
second quarter, a pass into the flat 
from Helm to Lyons found the latter 
in the clear, but efter a thirty jaunt 
the local back was run out cf bounds 
in miufield. The first half ended with 
neither team tallying a marker. 

The home team broke the salsmate 
early in the third session when Romero 
ran Zubcck's kiokofT from his own 10 
to the Susquehanna 45 yard line. May- 
hew, a great halfback for the metros, 
skirted left end on a reverse to the 
local 26 yard stripe. At this point the 
Staggmen were penali ed 15 yards for 
roughness. From the 10 yard stripe 
an end around play with Von Frank 




DICK MATTHEWS 
22C-pour.d Crusi-der tackle, who reach- 
ed a rew height in his hard-hitting 
defeats play against C. C. N. Y. last 
Saturday 



lugging the ball placed the pigskin on 1 back to pass and again spotted Zuback 
the Crusader 1 yard marker. Mayhew in the open. The latter caught the 
was stopped at the line of scrimmage ball on the dead run and behind beau- 
but on the fourth down, Romero | if ul blocking, raced 47 yards to put the ; 
hurdled the line to score for the home men of Stagg in the lead. Heaton j 



Preparations Made 
For Hockey Play Day 

Next Saturday is the day scheduled 
for the Hockey Play Day which is to 
be held at Susquehanna this year. Leb- 
anon Valley, Cedar Crest, and Ship- 
pensburg are to be represented and 
about sixty girls are expected to be 
here. The Play Day is sponsored by 
the W. A. A. and plans are under way 
to make this a big day for Susque- 
hanna. 

The visitors will arrive in the morn- 
ing in time to register at 10 o'clock, 
following registration the games will 
begin at 10:30. The opponents for the 
wo games in the morning are chosen 
)y drawing straws, while the oppon- 
ents of the afternoon games are the 
wo teams which won in the morning 
ind the two teams which lost in the 
:norning. After the first two hockey 
:ames each girl in W. A. A. is assigned 
to take care of two visitors and show 
them around the campus. At 12:33 
he hockey teams will eat together in 
he dining room after which a pro- 
ram will be given by members of the 
VV. A. A. The afternoon games begin 
it 2:15 and at 4:30 a tea will be given 
in Seibert Hall parlors for the visitors. 
Miss Shure has not yet announced 
he players who will make up our own 
nockey team; but practice has been 
called for every evening this week, and 
the line-up will be chosen later. The 
following girls are candidates: Hutchi- 
son, Welsh, McWilliams, Fenner, West, 
Brand, Heefner, Hoover, Gait, Poor- 
baugh, Crompton, Davis, Reitz, Ben- 
nage, Bauman, Cox, Grothe, Krumb- 
holz, Crow, Leffler, Crawford, Warner, 
md Zaremba, 

Everyone is invited to attend the 
Hockey Play Day and help make it a 
big day for Susquehanna. 



team. Von Frank place-kicked the ex- 
tra point. Duiing the remaining min- 
utes of the third peiiod, the Lavender 
held the Staggmen with ease and as 
the quarter ended it was Susquehanna's 
ball on its own 23 yard line. 

On the opening play of the final 
stan- a, Helm picked up five yards off 
tackle. On the next play Steve Zera- 
vica faded back and threw a long pass 
intended for John Zuback. The ball 
bounced off Romero's shoulder Into 
Ziback's arms, the latter stumbled mo- 
mentarily but then raced some fifty 
odd yards to tally for the locals. Heat- 
on's placement tied the score, 7-7. 

After Zuback's kickoff went out of 
bounds on the thirty, an exchange of 
punts brought the ball into possession 
of the Crusaders on their own 25 yard 

stripe. Zeravica rolled up two first j Fletcher R. T. 

downs for the locals In rapid succes- 
sion and it appeared as though the 
visiting eleven was on the march. 
However, the Crusaders broke the run- 
n 'ng routine as Zeravica again faded 



igain booted the extra point. 

Interference on a pass gave the Lav- 
ender tire ball on Susquehanna's 30 in 
he closing minutes, but Fletcher bat- 
ed a Romero pass into Phil Templin's 
lands and the final two minutes the 

rusaclt'is held the ball. 

Zeravica, Helm, and Zuback sparked 
the Crusaders on the oilensive while 
Fletcher, Campana, and Heaton re- 
peatedly threw the Friedman proteges 
for losses. Romero and Mayhew led 
the attack for the home team. 

lineups: 

Susquehanna City College 

Greco L. E Von Frank 

R. Matthews ... L. T Alevl :on 

Campana L. G Strahl 

Templln C Gmltro 

J. Matthews ... R. G Rosenfeld 

Boye 

Heaton R. E Dougherty 

Zuback Q. B Romero 

"elm L. H Aronson 

Wos R. H Mayhew 

Zeravica F. B Goeschel 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

111 Market Street. Sunhury. Pa 
Also Framing and Photn Finishing 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



BINGAMAN'S 2KS 

Sandwiches — Pot Reef Ham. Eg;' 

Weiner. Cheese, Hambrrger 

Vegetable Sorp. Raked Beans, 

Ire Cream 

1 W. PINE ST. SELINSGROVE 



IPhiMu Delta Downed by 
Scrappy Freshmen, 12-0 

The scrappy freshman touch football 
team remained very much in the run- 
ning for the championship by scoring 
i 12-0 victory over favored Phi Mu 
Delta. The game was played last Wed- 
nesday and placed the two teams in a 
deadlock for the league leadership. 

After a keenly contested first per- 
iod, the uncanny aerial attack of the 
class of '44 began to click. Ralph 
Brown flipped a long heave to Jim 
Clark for the game's first tally, and 
thereafter the frosh dominated play. 
Bill Jansen snared a pass from Glenn 
Schueler for the clinching score. 

As is the case with any consistent 
winner in sporting events, the fresh- 
men realise that their continued sue- i 
cess is due to the everlasting teamwork 
of each member. 

In racking up their third win in four 
starts the ceaseless effort and indomit- 
able spirit of Glenn Schueler, Roy Gut- 
shall, Jim Clark, Ralph Brown, Marlin 
Bollinger. Ray Hochstuhl, Bill Jansen, 
and Dave Lohman proved to be the 
deciding factor. 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 


Store 


Susquehanna Stationery 


SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT Ff OWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



strand 

I II I A I B | 

_____ suiibtry 



NOW SHOWING 

Gary Ccoper 
Walter Brennan 

In 

"The Westerner" 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

Tyrone Power 
Linda Darnell 

in 

"Brigham Young" 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

James Stewart 
Rcsalind Russell 

in 

"No Time for 
Comedy" 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

« • ■ 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

JOEL McCREA LARAINE DAY 

HERBERT MARSHALL 

"Foreign 
Correspondent" 

FRIDAY 

ROSALIND RUSSELL 

BRIAN AHERNE 

VIRGINIA BRUCE 

'Hired Wife" 



i'.T\ 



SATURDAY 
GEORGE O'BRIEN 



Triple Justice" 

MONDAY 

BORIS KARLOFF 

MARJORIE REYNOIPS 

Doomed to Die" 

TITFSDAV 
GEORGE RPENT 
VTRGIN»A BRUCE 

"Man Who Talked 
Too Much" 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

ynvpn-hor fl - 7 
JAWFS GA'^'EY 
ANNE SHERIDAN 

'Citv for (Vquesf 

FRIDAv powwnmm 8 

'EW AVPFS 

LIO v F» PAWRVMORE 

LARAINE DAY 

'Dr. KilnVe Goes 
Home" 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 



JEWELER 



SELINSGROVE, FA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Stcre 

411 Market St., S-nbrry. Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
Tk§ $$*a£l Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



HACKETT'S 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS. DRESSES. HATS 

Sunhurv, Pa. 



TYDOL 



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RENNER'S 

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Walnut SI reel Scllnscrove Pa 





H. K. W, t tlACH LINE 




trips to clvr the (o!lc p Student- 




'he lir-1 *.cr\irc, rspecl'illv •he Sun 




■ur? StcdciMs U'hv TR WEI will, 




in individual The Coach line In 




i»rps ever* person TIIIVK THAI 




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VV itvf.nl. .« f, |>t| |';i xli.ivHIr f- 



PAGE I- OIK 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



' 



Preparations Begun OVER THE 

On Frosh-Soph Game |. . AIRWAVES 



Win Over Freeburg 
Opens Hockey Season 



Dr. Wilson Sneaks at 
Educational Convention 



Feverish Activity <. haracterixes Pre- 
liminary Plans as Frosh Hope for 
First Victor\ Since 1928 



Ernest preparations tor the yearly 
freshman-sophomer football game one 
oi the highlights of Homecoming Day, 
are making rapid pro) e I he game 
will be played on the morning of No- 
vember 9 as a preliminary evenl to the 
big afternoon Moravian-Susquehanna 
game. Int< rei I la i a high pitch and 
indications are that ii will be the 
bitterly fought "frosh-soph" contest In 
history. 

At anj rate, the fray will not be 
lacking in age-old tradition unci color. 
It, no doubt, will be one of those "knock 
'em down, drag 'em out" tussles worthy 
ni the casual observation of many of 
the faculty, alumni, students and 
friends. 

The gam* 's objeel Is to enable stu- 
dents who are not out for the varsity 
football team and who otherwise would 
have no opportunitj to play In a regu- 
lar grid same to realize through actual 
participation the general concept of 
football. Therefore, Coaches Stagg, 
Jr., and Pritchard Btarted teaching the 
two teams the fundamentals today. 
They Intend to hold regular practice 
periods unci to teach each team any 
types of plays that may be desired. 

Dating from H>22, I he .sophomores 
boe t of seven victories and only two 
defeats, while three games have em ed 
In deadlocks. The last victory record- 
ed bv the frosh wai In 1038. Last 
year found the sophomores tallying a 
convincing 19-0 win. The highest score 
of the series was racked up in 1828 

when tiif sophomores ran up a 28-o 
margin. All in all, it looks as though 
a close and exciting game is on tap. 

The aggressive freshman team al- 
ready lias three workouts under its 
belt, while the sophomores have com- 
pleted two highly satisfactory prac- 
tice.-. 

Commenting on the game, Coaches 
ShUSta and Deardorff both expressed 
their enthusiasm over the large and 
spirited squad that greeted them at the 
flrsl freshman workout last Thursday 
afternoon. Allho a little along the op- 
timistic .skh\ your reporter recorded 
the lollowine, statement by Head Coach 
Chet Bhtata: rhe '40 freshman team 
will, without doubt, go down in history 
as one of tfie greatest aggregations that 
has ever been put on the held. The 
sophomores can expeel a crushing de- 
feat. it i.s true that the sophomore 
team won last year, but I feel confi- 
dent that this year the tables will be 

turned." 

Assistant Coach Karl DeardorM add- 
ed, "We expect to put a team on the 
field which, although it ma] be lighter 
and more inexperienced, is expected 
to outplay the sophomores in every de- 
partment by the use of a wide variety 
of trick plays This team will have as 
its objective another frosh vacation." 

The sophomore coaches, Tom Lewis 
and Gua Kaufman, as yet have made 

no pre-game comments; however, if 
the Whispers going the rounds are any 

Indication ol their team's prepared- 
ness, woe be unto those frosh! 

Among the first candidates to re- 
port for trie freshman team were Dave 
Lehman, BUI Jansen, Ernie Bodner, 
Jim Clark Ralph Brown. Glenn 
Schueler, Has Hochstuhl, Phil Adoni- 
„i(i Mai ii ii Bollinger, Hoy Qui 
Stuard Flicklngi r, and Prank Atth i 

The sophomore candidates known 
thus far as John Hugus, John Wolfe, 
chuck Oundrum, Jim Mllford, Sid 

ha labelling; Ed Jaine. . John Walsh, 
and hill Curry. 



Beginning this week we shall in- 
clude in "Over the Air Waves" not 
onlj the review of the invitation to 
Learning number being presented by 
Columbia on Sunday atfernoon. but 
also a brief program of the most out- 
standing of music ami literary pre- 
mutations during the coming week. 
We encourage each student to listen-in 
on as many of these programs as pos- 
sible with the aim of gaming real en- 
joyment and at the same time an ap- 
iiatlon for the great works of art 
>j -.'.huh men of all ages have con- 
tributed. 

The number to be presented over tlu 
Columbia Broadcasting System Sun- 
day afternoon, November 3, from 4:3U 
to 9 ;>. m, is Michael de Montaigne's 

■ Essays." 

Michael De .Montaigne — Kssays 

Montaigne's motto. "What do 1 

\ know?", is characteristically a ques- 

i tion. For he loved questions, and as a 

! writer oi essays the original meaning 

i oi the word was "attempts"— he en- 
joyed the pursuit of the answer more 
than he did the answer itself. He was, 

i in ether words, a skeptic, and he has 

been called uol only the first but easily 
1 the best of his tribe. A skeptic by his 
definition would not be one who be- 
litves nothing but one who believes 
. -very thin;.', or who at any rate tries to 
: do so. Montaigne, a citizen of the 
Renaissance and of Prance, was so 
much at home in the realm of specu- 
lation dial he preferred never to leave 
it. His pleasure was to play with Ideas, 
and hi.s delight was the differences 
among men. His own personality, 
which the "Essays" richly if modestly 
declare, was so Charming that many of 
h.is readers are devoted to it alone; but 
he would have preferred that their de- | 
vot urn be given as ins was to the per- j 
ennially varying spectacle which men ; 
present . Bis scholarship was that of ] 
one wlio wanted to see from books 
vh.ii men used to be like; and his In- 
terest in his own times was an interest 
m their variety. Comparative in his 
.lew. he was one of the first anthro- 
pologists, indulgent by temperament 
and by choice, he was a forerunner of 
the principle of tolerance; brilliant and 
unassuming, he remains one of the 
nost engaging ol all ancient or mod- 
ern writers. 



hanna's soccer team got away to a 
flying start by beating Freeburg 6-0 on 
the home Held. Our team lias, for the 
past week or more, been practicing dur- 
ing their spare moments. The team is 
centered around such veterans as Bob 
Updegrove, George Herman. Dick 
Hersey. and John Hugus. Other Cru- 
saders that aided in the victory are: 
Fred Warner. Charlie Ague, Jim How- 
ell, Wilmer Grimm. Frank Attinger, 
John Wolfe, Fred Krebbs. and Warren 
Harold. Other players who are ex- 
pected to see action this season are: 
Melvin Jones, Don Stiber, Jason Shaef- 
er, and Ken Klmger. The fellows are 
trying hard to schedule games for the 
season. This year's team shows prom- 
ise of great improvement over last 
year's team. 



The state convention of secondary 
education was in session Thursday and 
Friday of last week at the Forum build- 
ing in Harrisburg, Penna. Dr. J. Er- 
nest Wagner. Superintendent of 
Schools of Johnstown, Penna., is the 
president of the roganization. 

Susquehanna University was repre- 
sented at the convention by Dr. Ar- 
thur Wilson. Dr. Wilson participated 
in a panel discussion on the relation 
of English in the high school to Eng- 
lish in the college. Dr. Cline of Get- 
tysburg College also was a member of 
the panel. Gettysburg and Susque- 
hanna were the only Liberal Arts col- 
leges represented at this meeting. 

S 

HUTCHISON AND MILLER 
AT S. G. CONFERENCE 



Hall followed by the general meeting 
to end the conference at which time 
summaries of the various discussions 
were given. 

Many ideas about student governing 
were received by the delegates and they 
believe that they can benefit by them. 
They also feel that they have given 
useful information to some of the dele- 
gates from other schools. 
S 

BARKED SHINS AND PARCHED 
THROATS MARK CONQUEST OF 
MT. MAHANOY 



Juniors Work Toward 
More Colorful Lanthorn 

Nancy Griesemer, editor-in-chief of 
the 1942 Lanthorn, announced that 
this year's book is entirely different 
and unique in relation to those of pre- 
vious years. Several new features will 
be included: the Band Festival will be 
presented as well, also, the group of 
Seniors just recently elected to the 
Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. 

To date, all individual pictures have 
been taken and by the end of Wednes- 
day the group pictures will be com- 
plete 

Predictions for a more colorful book 
are in order due to the fact that the 
entire school season will be portrayed. 

An innovation will be the dedication 
about which only the Junior class offi- 
cers and the faculty advisor have any 
cognizance since it is the purpose of 
the staff that it should remain a secret 
until the publication of the Lanthorn 
is released. 

S 



i Continued from Page 1) 
started. Some of the topics discussed 
were World Affairs, Honor Systems, 
Coordinating Activities Between Board- 
ing and Day Students. Financing an 
Association, Freshman Orientation, 
and Special Programs. 

Luncheon was served in Colonial 



(Continued from Page 1> 
One note of comments, this reporter 
should have been forearmed with the 
new knee-length socks that were worn 
to great advantage by Ellen Russell, 
although it wasn't much help when one 
merely lets gravity have rough-shod 
sway. 

Despite Mussel's absent-minded con- 
centration we all returned safely to 
terra firma — S. U. 




Alfred Wallenstein's Symphonic 
Strings: WOR, 8:30-9 p. m., Tuesday. 

Ray Heatherton, baritone, and Fran- 
cs I angford, contralto, sing with Ray- 
mond Paige's Orchestra on Musical 
Americana WEAF. 10:30-11 p m.. 
Wednesday. 

Walter Damrosch conducts the NBC 
Music Appreciation Hour: WJZ, 2-3, 
Friday. 

NBC Symphony Orchestra; Hans 
Wilhelm Steinberg conducts: WJZ, 10- 
U:S0 p. m . Saturday. 

Symphony Orchestra; Reginald 
Stewart, conductor: WABC, 9, Sunday. 

Drama: 

First Nighter Drama: WABC, 8:30-9 
p. m., Tuesday. 

Great Plays: Marlowe's Dr Fausius: 
WJZ. 3-4, Sunday. 
K 

Dr Luther Reed Speaks 
About "Gifts of (iod" 



Vesper., tins evening were led by 

Harold Mltman [he guest speaker ol 

the ev( nil; , was Dr. Luthei heed., presi- 
dent oi Mt. Airy Seminary. 

Dr. Reed spoke of the fact that God 
i given us two gre il gifts life and 

line. We should use our life now by 

building for our future life on tour 

foundation stone:,. These "slones" are: 
friendship, scholarship, character, and 
spiritual reality. 

.v. the close ol Dr, Reed's address 
Clyde Sechler sin/, "My heart Has a 

Thirst for God." 



A professor of economics at one of 
the large mid-western universities 
summoned a socially prominent co-ed 
to his office. Her work, he pointed out, 
was not satisfactory. 

"I just can't seem to understand or 
become interested in the course. But," 
she said pointedly, "f would do almost 
anything to keep from flunking." 

Abashed, the professor riffled the 
papers in his desk. 

"Er what are you doing tonight?" 
he asked quite as pointedly. 

"Nothing." 

"Then," said the professor, "why 
don't you study economics?" 



- Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Rekhley's 
SHOE SHINE 



Compliments of 

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N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



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Sl'MHRY, PENNA. 



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A fully accredited theological In- 
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For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



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MEN'S AND BOT8' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



MOYER'S SHOE 
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Ffth and Market Streets 
SUN BURY 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

(HILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



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29 N. Market St. Sellnsgfove, Pa. 




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Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



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Welcome* Students' Account* 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

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Northumberland, Pa 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Srllnsffrove. Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 
courses: — 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

POUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

KE-MEDICAL. PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A B. BS. and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD.. Pree 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



Hester Hoffman 
200 N. Broad St. 






Welcome 
Back 
Grads 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Good 
Luck 

Crusaders 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, 



FRIDAY. NOVEMBER . 1940 



Number II! 



Susquehanna Enjoys 
Famous Grid History 



Fifty-Two Years of Football Includes 
Victories Over Cornell. Fordham, 
Army; "Play Game for Sport" Policy 



Five fcrtumpha and a deadlock! Yes. 
his constitutes the most unusual rec- 
ord of Susquehanna's hl<?h flying 1940 
Crusaders. Therefore, the Homecom- 
ing Day gridiron, classic on University 
Field here tomorrow afternoon with 
the unbeaten, untied Moravian Grey- 
hounds will be a truly great feature. 

Hurriedly let us delve into the past 
football history of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. We are amazed at the great 
utvance made in the physical plant, 
including the athletic facilities which 
are a far step from the time when the 
first teams played in nearby corn-stub- 
bled fields. 

Organized athletics, M now found 
here, had their beginning back in the 
days of Missionary Institute. What 
was then known as Missionary Insti- 
tute first inaugurated football as a 
college game on Columbus Day, Octob- 
er 12, 1892, in a contest waged with 
the Sunbury Athletic Club. After the 
last rush had been made amid the 
shouts of triumph, the first Crusader 
gridiron victors were carried from the 
field upon the shoulders of an exultant 
(Continued on Page 4) 
S 

Dunkelberger Given 
Educational Office 



Decorating Head 




Dr. Bateman Speaks %« In Homecoming Celebration Tomorrow 

At Pi Gamma Mu 



DK. JOHN J. HOUTZ 
Prof. John J. Houtz is faculty advisor 
of the Men's Student Council which 
is introducing the idsa of competitive 
decorating for Homecoming Day. 
Jce Greco, '41, introduced the idea to 
the Council. 



Dr. George Dunkelberger has jus* 
been recently appointed the Pennsyl- 
vania member on the Committee on 
Professional Ethics for school teachers 
In the United States according to the 
announcement of Dr. Donald Dushane 
president of the National Educatior 
Association, and superintendent of 
schools at Columbus, Ind. 

Dr. Dukelberger's entire life has been 
devoted to teaching which has been in 
the rural schools, public schools, nar- 
mal schools, and colleges. He served 
as dean of the college at Susquehanna 
for nine years until he resigned to de- 
vote full time to classroom instruction 
and writing. 

At present Dr. Dunkelberger heads- 
up a number of important committees 
for the Pennsylvania Association of 
Liberal Arts Colleges and Is the chair- 
man of a committee which prepared 
the "Five Year Plan" of education leg- 
islation. He is recognized as an out- 
standing educator and psychologist 
and has been a leader of psychological 
research in education for many years. 
S 

Bonsall and Fisher Made 
Student Band Directors 



Students Compete In 
Beautifying Campus 



Mondav evening, November 4 Dr 
Sydney Bateman of Sunbury spoke to 
the Blemlc society or. the subject. 
"Thomas Edison As I Knew Him." Dr. 
B&teman was associated with Edison 
when he was experimenting with the 
first electric light plant in Sunbury. He 
began working with Edison on July 5. 
1R83. Sunbury has the distinction of 

I having the Brsl plant in the world to 
operate on the three wire system and 
it also was the first plant in this sec- 

' tion to demonstrate lighting by the in- 
candescent system. Dr. Bateman told 

j the group that the reason the station 

was situated in Sunbury was that cheap 

fuel was available, a town was wanted 

n which they could compete with gas, 

i and that men lived in Sunbury who 

I had faith in Edison and his accom- 
plishments. 

Dr. Bateman said in opening that 
there is much that is to be done, there 
are greater depths to be sounded, and 1 
greater heights to be attained than! 
?ver before and it is the student, whom j 
he termed "the pioneer of today," who 1 
has that task before him. 

Dr .Bateman told how the young Ed- ■ 
ison was thought peculiar, how hej 
worked and struggled until at the agej 
Of thirty-six he had already patented. 
250 inventions. He told of his terrific 
capacity for work and his great power I 
of concentration that led him to be- 1 
come one of the famed men of the j 
ages. At the fame time he pointed out | 
that Edison had nothing not possessed 





DR. G. MORRIS SMITH CALVIN V. ERDLY 

Dr. Smith, now in his thirteenth year as president of the university, will wel- 
come the returning alumni at the luncheon in Horton Dining Room to- 
morrow neon; Calvin V. Erdly, president of the Alumni Association and 
superintendent of schools in Lewistown, will give brief remarks on behalf 
of the "grads." 



RECORD NUMBER OF ALUMNI RETURN 
FOR BIG HOMECOMING CELEBRATION 



ngs is 
alumni. 



-S- 



Kelly Chooses Cast 
For Play 'Kind Lady' 



Election of student conductor of the 
band was held at band rehearsal last 



Today all the girls and fellows are 
busy putting the finishing touches to 

he decorations for Homecoming. ThisU y tne aver age person; he merely used! 
year a new idea of decorating build- 1 these smip i e talents. 

being used to welcome thej m dpgtaft ^ gpeaker ^ „ Edi _j 

! son was great because he devoted his 
TIM decorations are to be finished by| skiU to nelp human nee d, he was great! 

i o'clock this evening and in case of ] fcecause he was as humble as a child, j 

;ain 10 o'clock on Saturday morning. | and because he was a friend of man." | 
A plaque will be awarded at the j 

lance this evening for the best decor- j 

ited building. The judges are: Miss 

Jensen, Dean Gait, and Mr. Marion S. 

Schoch. a prominent citizen of Selins- 1 

grove. 

The campus entrance was decorated; 
iy the girl day students and the back \ 
•A Hassinger Hall by the men day stu- j 
dents, while the occupants of Seibert.j 
Hassinger, and Selinsgrove Halls and; 
he Cottage were adorned by residents! ^ McWilliams and C lyde Sech- 

2L^?JSPf^5 b . Ull l in ! S - ™L*P" S Mm have the leading roles in "Kind 

Lady," Mr. Walter Kelley, adviser to 
the theatre guild, announced Saturday. 
Louise will play the "Kind Lady." 
Clyde will act the part of Henry, a 
smooth villain in the play which is 
currently being revived on Broadway. 
Others in the cast are Doris Trainer 
Fred Brubaker, Blanche Forney. 
George MacQuesten, Dorothy Paulik. 
Paul Shatto, Janice Crawford, Ellen 
Russell. Maryruthe Sell, Lawrence 
Cady, Ruth Schwenk, and Pierce Allen 
Coryell. 
"Kind Lady" was adapted by Edward 



Grothe and Paulik Win 
Student Council Seats 



Two new members were elected to 
the Women's Student Council in chapsl 
on Wednesday morning. The new re- 
presentatives are Cornelia Grothe, 
sophomore, and Dorothy Paulik, fresh- 
man. 

The voting was done only by the 
members of the two classes affected; 
the girls who were on the ballot were: 
Mary Cox and Dorothy Dellecker, soph- 
cmores; Jean Buffintcn and Martha 
Jane Jacobs, freshmen. 



Alumni Secretary Pre- 
dicts Over 500 Will Re- 
turn; Program Given 



-s- 



McWilliams and Sechier Given Lead- 
ing Roles in Season Opener by Sus- | 
quehanna Players 



S. U. Band Participates 
In Hallowe'en Parade 



Music Guild and the S. A. I. fixed the 
Conservatory. The W. A. A. changed 
he gym's appearance. Each of the 
?raternities, Phi Mu, Beta Kappa, and 
lend and Key ornamented their own 
building. 

S 



Lawrence Cady Presents 
Review in Phi Kappa 



Phi Kappa held its meeting on Tues- 
day evening In the Greek room in G. 
A. Hall. 

Club president, Mary Emma Yoder, , 
conducted the business portion of the |chodorov from Hugh Walpoles strange 



meeting during which time several 



story- 



Tuesday evening. Kenneth Bonsall was committees were appointed to sponsor 
chosen for the post by his fellow mem- j the Club's social activities for the pre- 
bers; Nell Fisher was elected assistant | sent year. 

student conductor. The speaker of the evening was Law- 

It Is the duty of the 6tudent con- | rence Cady who presented a review of 
ductor to take charge of the band in j Will Durant's "The Life of Greece." 
the absence of the regular conductor : Mr. Cady pointed out the style and 
and to act as band librarian. (Continued on Page 4) 

Pattern of Precedents Revealed In 
Survey of Homecoming Traditions 



Saturday is Homecoming. The old 
grads will be back with wives, hus- 
bands, future students, and memories. 
Homecoming is a big day at Susque- 
hanna; and over the years its celebra- 
tion has not, in the large pattern, 
changed too much. There's a football 
<4ame, a meal, and, somewhere in be- 
tween, speeches, teas, and dances, and 
prominent grads. 
1935 

Five years ago a variation of the 
usual Friday - night- before - Homecom - 
mg was tried out. Instead of the usual 



Fraternities Finish 
Plans for Alumni 

Susquehanna's three fraternal organ- 
izations. Beta Kappa, Bond and Key 
and Phi Mu Delta, are busily making 
plans In anticipation of the homecom- 
ing of the formerly graduated mem- 
bers of the brotherhoods. Each fra- 
ternity, decorated for festivities, ex- 
pects large numbers of alumni to re- 
turn to their campus homes. 

Phi Mu Delta is celebrating the 25th 
anniversary of its founding by ban- 
queting in princely style at the Hotel 
Governor Snyder tomorrow evening 
leld. dismaying Washington, 12-0. The wives and sweethearts of the 
The game over, the sororities gave alumni are to be entertained later In 
teas; and the fraternities held dances 



Next day, Saturday, November 2, 
Captain Walt Wasilewski and Jim Rit- 
ter and Tom Valunas mow assistant 
coach at the local high school) and 
Tom Lewis, romped up and down the 



five years ago. 
-S- 



Susquchanna helped Selinsgrove 
celebrate Hallowe'en Thursday even- 
ing. Dean Gait served as one of the 
parade judges, and the college band 
marched down the street, played, and 
then marched on again. Individual stu- 
dents clustered about Reichley's and 
watched. 

Dean Gait judged parade contest- 
ants from the second floor balcony of 
the Hotel Governor Snyder, where he 
and the other judges were perched. 
Afterwards Dean Gait wiped his fore- 
head, grinned wearily, and said, "That 
was some parade, wasn't it?" 

The University Band joined with 
the high school band for a public con- 
cert. Under the direction of Mr. El- 
rose A. Allison, the band members 
formed a large oval before the Judges' 
stand and played marching and patri- 
>tlc airs. 

Between band numbers, prizes were 
warded, and twice the announcer re- 
luested the Susquehanna freshmen to 
Button, froth." When, after the first 
request, the freshman response was 
considered inadequate, upper classm a 
required the freshman to button again, 



Susquehanna will celebrate tomorrow 
at the annual Homecoming Day fes- 
tivities. According to H. Vernon Blough, 
alumni secretary, who is in charge of 
arrangements for the events there will 
be a record crowd of alumni, probably- 
over 500, back to witness the most ex- 
citing program of events in recent 
years. 

Highlights of the program for the 
week-end are: 

* * * 

Deadline on Decorating— Friday even- 
ing, 6 p. m. Judging will be clone be- 
tween 6:30 and 8:30 p. m. 

• » * 

Pep Jamboree — Friday evening, 7 p. m. 

in Alumni Gymnasium. There will be 
gridders of former years present, 
stunts, torch parade, bonfire, refresh- 
ments, and dancing. All free. 

* * * 

Frosh-Sopb Football Classic — Saturday 
morning at 9:30 on Crusader Field. 

* ♦ * 

All-Star — Alumni Hockey Match— Sat- 
urdi'v morning at 10:00 on the W. A. 
A. Field. 

• * • 

Alumni Luncheon— Saturday. 12:15 p. 
m. it) Horton Dining Room. 

• * » 

Football Game — Susquehanna vs. Mor- 
avian College. University Held, kick- 
Ofl at 2 p, m. 

I'll i Mu Delta Dinner— Saturday even- 
ing at 5:45 p. m., dining room of 
Oovernor Snyder Hotel. 

Fraternity Homecoming Dunes — Sat- 
urday evening, 8:uu to 12:00 p. m 



Many Ex-Footballers to Head List 
of Graduates Returning Saturday 



that night. 
1936 

Next year, the torchlight parade was 
abolished, and an "Old Clothes Dance" 
was sponsored by the Men's Student 
Council in its place. "The Susque- 



bonflre, a torchlight parade through hanna" for that period does not state 



every cranny of Selinsgrove was substi- 
tuted. Long lines of students leaping 
and howling, and brandishing their 
torches followed the band* and a State 
Highway cop who was seeing to the 



safety of cars that might inadvertently ' Swope, Pete Shuty, Tom Valunas, and 

set In the way) all over town and back Vincent Frattali shone. 

to Pine Lawn, which was serenaded. 1937 

students, still unworn then, danced In 

'-he gym for the benefit of band uni- 

lorms. 



the evening at the chapter house. Art 
Wendell's orchestra has been engaged 
to furnish the music for the dance. 
Dan MacCartney is social chairman. 

Bond and Key has arranged a pleas- 
ing program for the entertainment of 
its guests. There the dancers will trip 
the light fantastic to the music of 
Howard Gale's orchestra from Harris- 
burg, according to social chairman 
Melvin Jones. 

Beta Kappa has planned an enjoy- 
able day by having an alumni lunch- 
eon at 11:00 a. m. at the fraternity 
house. At night the music of Eddie 
Gordon and his orchestra will fill the 
The year the now-Senlors were j ears and guide the feet of the danc- 
Freshmen, there was a pep rally the i ers. Neil Fisher heads plans for this 
(Continued on Page 4) I event. 



the dance was so labelled out of neces 
sity. 

Saturday, November 7, 1936, after an 
alumni luncheon, Susquehanna beat 
Princeton's second team, 13-6. Harry 



Susquehanna's alumni will be back 
in force for Homecoming tomorrow. 
Calvin v. Erdly, president oi the alum- 
ni association will, certainly, be on 

hand. So will Reverend Wiiliiun E. 
Swope, of Lebanon, :ind the Rev. Bur- 
leigh A. Peters. '14, of Altoona. both 

of past gridiron fame, 

Other former gridders who'll be on 
the sidelines arc the lull backlield of 
Susquehanna's previous great unde- 
feated team, Johnny Meyers, Steve 
Martinet 1 , Johnny Hanna, and "Skip"' 
RiShell, Milt Herman. '99. local hard- 
ware merchant, will be back. So will 
George Moser, '31, a former fullback, 
now a RarrlsbUTg insurance agent, and 
his wife, Beatrice Dew ire, '31. Ray 
Scott, '31, a great quarterback, now 
assistant coach at PottSVille, and Ralph 
Christopher, '31, of Fast W«*nin«rton, 
a former Crusader guard, will be on 
hand. 

More football players who'll be in the 
grandstands are Johnny Wall. '30, of 
Evanston. Indiana, manager oi a bott- 



. and one of Busque- 
Banna's big men in the backfleld, Bill 
Sullivan. 38, with Swift Packing Com- 
wmy, located in Selinsgrove another 
membei oi the undefeated Crusaders ol 
"32, intends to keep unbroken his ton 
ord of never missing a game. Re\ 

William E Janson, HO, Oi fork, for- 
mer nid ureal and coach, will be on 
hand to cluck up on I lie team. 

Chet RogOWicx, "24, director of ath- 
letics at Pottsvllle, i n r going to mi 
the Crusaders- and tie:, the only Cru- 
sader athlete to captain three sporti 
for two seasons, 

Ralph Witmer. treasurer ol the Sny- 

dei County Trust Company, Bellns- 

grOVe, BOWlj married, will DC in the 

rtandi 

Dr. John I. Woodruff, first football 
coach Susquehanna ever had. will wit- 
ness the fame; so will Dr, PlSher, Sus- 
quehanna's second en*Ch, They'll be 
item mentors for the Crusaders of 
1940. 

• Continued on Page 4» 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940 



Yost Elected Prexy for ! Girls Muster Strength 



Student Recital Class 



Students' Hecital Class held its first 
informal meeting Monday, October 21, 
at 4:15. An election of officers preced- 
ed the program. They are: 
Lois Yost, president; Ralph Wolfgang, 
vice president; June Hendricks, secre- 
tary; Louise Wc Williams, treasurer; 
and Charles Reichley. monitor. 

Program 

1 . Piano—* 'June" Llrid 

Ruth Schwenk 

2. Song-"J\Iy Heart and the Rain"— 
Neidlinger 

Elizabeth Walters 

3. Song— "O Lord Most Holy"— C. 
Franck 

Franklin Fertlg 

4. Piano-"-A Canebrake Time"— Wright 

John Leach 

5. Song-" Bohemian Folk Song" 

Dorothy Artz 

6. Comet — "Encore Polka" Smith 

Eugene Aurand 

7. Piano— "Japanese Etude" . . Poldinl 

Louise McWilliams 

8. Song-' 'Melody of My Love"— Ma- 
lotte 

Dorothy Holmes 

9. Piano— "Alt- Wien" ... Godowesky 

Jean Bowers 

10. Song— "The Irish Hills"— Townsley 

Ruth Schwenk 

11. Song— "I'll Never Ask You to Tell" 
C. Fox 

Emanell Whitenight 

12. Piano — "Fantasle-Impromptu" — 
Chopin 

Helen Hocker 

13. Song— "Lullaby" P. Kiel ' 

Doris Welch 

14. Song — "My Spirit Like a Shepherd 
Boy"— Russell 

Eleanor Lyons 
The Evening Recital will be held in 
Seibert Hall November 4, and the Fac- 
ulty Recital date is November 25. 
S 

New York Alumni Club 
Holds Initial Meeting 



For Combat in Hockey 
Round- Robin Games 



REGISTRATION RECALLS 
DRAFTS OF LAST WAR 



Girls' hockey round-robin begins this 
week according to the notice made by 
Jane Hutchison. The schedule of the 
games is as follows: 
Monday, October 21 

3:00— Juniors - freshmen 

4:15— Seniors - sophomores 
Wednesday, October 23 

3:00— Juniors - sophomores 

4:15— Seniors - freshmen 
Thursday, October 24 

3:00— Sophomores - freshmen 

4:15— Seniors - Juniors 

The squads from which the various 
teams will be chosen consist of: 

Seniors : Mendenhall, B e n n a g e , 
Hutchison, Tribby, Smith, Davis, 
Beamenderfer, Miller, Poor b a u g h , 
Rettz, Ritter, Specht, and Reese; 

Juniors: Penner, Bauman, Heefner, 
Unangst, Brand, Schweitzer, Schwenk, 
Fomey, Hoover, Williams, Griesemer, 
and Miller; 

Sophomores: Chamberlain, Gait, 
Ulsh, Beer, Grothe, Lauver, McCork- 
ill, E. Williamson, Crow, Lamade, 
Welsh, McWilliams, Bowers, and Cox; 
Freshmen: Crawford, Leffler, Bar- 
tholomew, Soley, Ulrich, Wanser, Zar- 
j emba, Trainer, Gordon, Russel, Lamon, 
Hen-old, Frank, and Jacobs. 
S 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ent to support the Army of Occupation 
in Austria at Udine, Capriva, and Gor- 
izio. Those who did not perish in the 
ruins had the privilege of seeing what 
was left of Paris, Versailles, and many 
other cities. 

S 

STUDENTS EXPERIMENT WITH 
POLITICS AMID SPEECHES. 
BANNERS. BALLOTS 



Immediately the intelligentsia of Sel- 
insgrove moved toward the polls with 
deliberation. Each person was weigh- 
ing the facts; each wanted to vote 
fairly. The vote was thus: Willkie — 
103, F. D. R.— 39, Snerd— 12, Indepen- 
dent — 2. 

The business society who sponsored 
this mock election, held a short meet- 
ing in Seibert Social Rooms following 
the election. Flans were discussed for 
a probable Skating Party in Novem- 
ber. 



The Susquehanna Alumni Club of 
Metropolitan New York and Northern 
New Jersey will hold its first gathering 
of the year at the George Washington 
Hotel, New York City, on Saturday 
following the football game between 
Susquehanna and the City 
New York. 

Rev. Paul Hoover, '29, president of 
the New York-Susquehanna Alumni 
Club, sent personal announcements to 
over a hundred Susquehannans resid- 
ing In this area. The outstanding fea- 
ture of tine meeting will be a banquet 
in the Colonial Room of the George 
Washington Hotel at which Edward 
Dalby, '22, supervising principal of the 
Marlborough Schools, New York City. 
will serve as toastmaster. 

Other alumni who hold prominent 
offices In the club include Anna Nor- 
wat, '26, secretary, and Roger Blough, 
'25, treasurer. Hayes Gordon, '26; Rev. 
Russell Auman, '30; and Lawrence 
Dodd, 3Q, comprise the executive com- 
mittee. 

S 



"LiF Sis" Will Froliek 
With "Big Sis" on Hike 

There's always something new on the 

I campus. Next Saturday afternoon 

j around two o'clock is the time set for 

this novelty. At the opening of the 

: school year the girls in S. C. A. were 

given "little sisters" whom they were 

;to look after during the beginning of 

the term. That idea is being continued 

now and on Saturday, October 26, the 

"big sisters" are to take their charges 

on a hike sponsored by the S. C. A. 

The hike is in charge of Florence 
Reitz, who is the women's president. 
She promises a good time and good 
October refreshments to all those who 
attend. 

S 

Campus Club Begins; 
college of Welcome New Members 



(Continued from Page 2) 
his display of radio signals, but since 
he represented the people we can un- 
derstand. 

Mr. Warner spoke first. (Cheer and 
whistle a la Snerd). He spoke briefly 
and to the point. He stated that Mr. 
Willkie wanted to know why the fac- 
tories were closed on October 12 (radio 
signal— applause)! He said that in 
such a crisis as we have today it is 
better to have a third Term than a 
third Rater (Boo!) 

Here again the WwW's held (swing 
and) sway with "Turkey in the Straw" 
—(personally that jug— just a bit off 
key). 

Dramatically Mr. Smith, speaking in 
behalf of Mr. Willkie, took his place 
behind the lectern. At first his words 
were Inaudible — there was so much 
cheering (also several boos) and whist- 
ling. This was generally without the 
kind assistance of Mr. Snerd. Finally 
Mr. Smith could be heard. The voters 
listened with intent ears. Smlttie made 
four points of importance (if you wish 
( ;he points, see me). He harped on the 
dea of getting back to the old cus- 
,om of swap, and he warned against a 
hird term dictatorship. 

"He'll be coming round the moun- 
tain." Who? Ask me November fifth. 
*fter the cheers, hisses, shouting, 
whistling, and "music" subsided, Mr. 
Corcoran again took the chair and 
this time he called on Mr. Snerd— (he 
prefers Snerd). Says Snerdie: "De 
people knows vat dey want so yo* might 
as veil get down thar and vote." P. S. 
Snerdie could think of no more to say. 



S. C. A. HEARS ABOUT 
WHOLESOME ATTITUDES 



(Continued from Page 1) 
place help others to cultivate the bet- 
ter things of life. The third type is 
the person who is "down-in-the- 
dumps," as each one of us is at some 
time or other. There are several ways 
of dealing with this type, but the only 
active and effective method is that un- 
derstanding approach we can make 
with a cheery "Hello," and a bending- 
over-backwards in lending a helping 
hand. 

In closing, Harry led the students in 
pledging that they would "strive to 
their utmost, throughout the whole 
next day, to do unto others as they 
would have others do unto them." 



)f the individual and non such defer- 
ment shall be made of individuals in 
.ny plant or institution. An unskilled 
worker in a munitions factory may be 
msily replaced and thus not eligible 
.or exemption, while a skilled man in 
i key position in some less essential 
industry may be exempt. 

A limited degree of conscription of 
industry is authorized by the law. Each 
.rm is obligated to accept government 
orders at a reasonable price and to give 
them preference over all other work. 
if any plant refuses to cooperate in 
these manners, the President may take 
possession of it and have it operated 
by the government at a fair and just 
rental. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



DRAFT ACT DISCUSSED 
AS TO ITS ECONOMIC 
PROVISIONS ; IMPLICATIONS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Similar deferment may be made for 
men upon whom other persons are de- 
pendent for support. This classifica- 
tion is determined solely by the status 



S. IL BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



The first meeting of the Campus 
Club was held Wednesday. October 16, 
in Seibert parlors. Mrs. Arthur Her- 
man Wilson was hostess for the occas- 
slon. The other members of the com- 
mittee in charge of the meeting were 
Mrs. Yorty, Mrs. Scudder, and Mrs. 
Ahl. The new members of the club, 
Miss Jensen, Miss Hein, Mrs. Hatz, 
and Mrs. Heath, were extended a wel- 
come into the club by the chairman, 
Mrs. Stagg. Mrs. Giauque was ap- 
pointed to serve as chairman for the 
November meeting. 

This is an organization made up of 
women of the faculty and wives of fac- 
ulty members. 

K.D.P. Girls Breakfast 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145- Y 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

29 N. Market St. Selinsgrove, Pa. 




Gait and Russ Address Together in First Social 
Dauphin Co. Teachers 



Kappa Delta Phi sorority started off 
October 18, Dr. William their social events for the year with a 
Dean Russell Gait 



On Friday 
A. Russ and Dean Russell Gait at- 
tended t he Dauphin County Teachers 
Institute held at Hershey. Dr. Isaac 
App, county superintendent of Dauph- 
in Count y, was in charge of the meet- 
ing. 

Dr. UTT" addressed the social science 
sections of both the morning and af- 
ternoon sessions. Dr. Gait addressed 
all the English sections during the 
morning and afternoon sessions. 

After that meeting Dr. Russ went to 
Penn St ale to attend the Ninth An- 
nual Convention of the Pennsylvania 
Historical Association. 

Dr. Russ is a member of the Council 
which Is the governing body of the as- 
sociation. He was also appointed pro- 
gram crxalrman for the coming year. 
-S- 

An otTiceholder r 
has trarJed the bunk 



sorority breakfast held in the sorority 
room on Saturday, October 12, at 7 a. 
in. It was surprising to see how many 
of the girls succeeded In getting out of 
bed early enough to be there at least 
by 7:15. Even Miss Reed succeeded in 
finding her way down from the Cottage 
through the early morning fog. 

The breakfast was held as the first 
social get-together of the year and Miss 
Jensen. Miss Hein, and Miss Reed were 
the guests. The menu included: or- 
ange juice, fried ham and eggs, coffee, 
and buns. Everybody seemed to con- 
sider the breakfast so much fun that 
they thought they would try to get up 
that early in the morning for another 
one later on. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St.. SellnsgTove. Pa. 



a politician 
for a berth! 



who 



Sk 



Makes 
light U. \,'-..-C^ 

lunch refreshing 



ROYAL Portable TYPEWRITERS 
STATIONERY SUPPLIES 

JOS. S. MENTZ 

266 Market Square 
Sunbury, Penna. 





Sunbury Coca Cola 
Bottlinjr Works 

SI NBURY 
it. I' Q. Edwards, Manager 



See 

MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

Come to Life at 

LIEB'S 

"For Things That Are Different" 

SUNBURY. PENNA. 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, Prsiident 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 



Northumberland, Pa. 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS* 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa, 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standarc 
courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

POUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

'.-RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

O. Morris 8mith. A.M.. DD., Pr«» 
Rusfell Gait. Ph.D.. Dean 



Hester Hoffman 
200 N. Broad St. 



mummkjm 



Highlights 
Of the Week 



Debate Meeting: Thursday 

The debate squad will hold its week- 
ly meeting on Thursday afternoon at 
4 p. m. in G. A. 301. There is still an 
opportunity for newcomers to join the 
squad. 

S. C. A. Service Thnrsday Evening 

"Our Individual and Group Respon- 
sibility" will be the topic of discussion 
at the S. C. A. meeting Thursday even- 
ing at 6:45 p. m. The meeting will be 
held in Seibert Hall Social Rooms. 

Hockey Play Day Here 

The Susquehanna hockey squad un- 
der Miss Shure will play host to visit- 
ing hockey teams from: Cedar Crest, 
Stiippensburg, and Lebanon Valley. 

irusaders Face Allegheny 

Seeking their fifth victory of the 
season the Susquehanna eleven will 
engage the Allegheny College 'Gators 
in Meadville Saturday. 

Ladies' Auxiliary to Meet 

A mass meeting of all the branches 
of the Ladies' Auxiliary of Susque- 
hanna University will convene in Sei- 
bert Hall Saturday afternoon at 2 p. m. 

S. C. A. Scavenger Hunt 

S. C. A. social events will be con- 
tinued Saturday evening when this 
group will sponsor a scavenger hunt 
to leave from Seibert Hall at 7:3C. 
Competitive teams will vie for prizes; 
refreshments will be served to win- 
ners and to losers. 

Pi Gamma Mu Monday 

The third monthly meeting of Pi 
Gamma Mu will feature Dr. Sidney E. 
Bateman who will speak on "Thomas 
A. Edison as I Knew Him." The meet- 
ing will be held in Steele Science 100 
at 7:30; the public is invited. 

Student Evening Recital 

Students of the conservatory will 
present a recital in Seibert Auditorium 
Monday evening at 8:00 p. m. 

Phi Kappa to Meet 

The monthly meeting of the Greek 
Club will he held Tuesday evening at 
7 p. m. in G. A., room 205. 
S 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER V.), DM0 



Number 12 



Debate Squad Meets; JS. U. Invited to Help 



Decides on Question 



To Consider Pan-American Union 
This Year; Gundrum Made Manager; 
Plans Made for Extended Trip 



Beta Kappa Entertains 
At "Open House" Party 

Open house was held at Beta Kappa 
last Saturday evening, with members 
and their ladies holding forth at the 
400 West Pine street chapter house. 
The party started at 7:30 and the even- 
ing was spent dancing to such masters 
as Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, and 
Glen Gray via a new combination 
radio and record player. Some guests 
who, perhaps, had ascended Mahanoy 
with the Biemic Society and were tir- 
ed, preferred to play cards. Others did 
well at that ancient game called pittf 
pong. 

Bob Booth, well-known impersonat- 
or, made a great hit with the assemb- 
lage in the roles of various campus 
characters. Another high spot of the 
evening was the serving of refresh- 
ments at 9:30, consisting of sand- 
wiches, ice cream, and sweet cider. 

One of the well-known guests was 
Jack Shipe, who made the pilgrimage 
from his home in Herndon. Mr. Dan- 
iel Reitz acted as chaperon. 

When the party broke up at 10:30 
everyone seemed loath to leave. Much 
credit was given to Neil Fisher who, as 
social chairman, was largely respons- 
ible for the success of the party. 

This was one of the quota of open 
house parties arranged by each of the 
fraternities during the year. 



The debating squad has decided to 
debate the national question, "Resolv- 
ed, that the nations of the Western 
Hemisphere should enter into a perma- 
nent union." 

Charles Gundrum, '43, will serve as 
manager for this year's teams. Profes- 
sor Gilbert announced his appointment 
to the squad, meeting in G. A. 300 last 
Thursday at four. Gundrum acted as 
issistant manager last year. 

The decision to adopt the national 
question was made because most of the 
squad members expressed the desire to 
debate more out of state teams, instead 
of only the traditional Susquehanna 
rivals on the two annual routes the de- 
baters have been taking These have 
been through the western part of 
Pennsylvania, and through the south- 
eastern section of the state, Northern 
Maryland, and New Jersey. 

The question was chosen by the Com- 
mittee on Inter-Association Relations 
of the National Association of Teach- 
ers of Speech. Dr. Charles R. Layton 
of Muskingum College, New Concord, 
Ohio, is chairman of the committee. 

Professor Gilbert read an invitation 
extended by Winthrop College a girls' 
school in South Caioiiiu to partici- 
pate in an All-A:ner?can :ipeech tour- 
nament. Each si-ring Winfinvo holds 
this wiuely known forensic meet. 

Twelve students have come out for 
the squad. Thus far, they are G. Ro- 
bert Booth, Harry Thatcher, David 
Keim, Merle Hoover, Fred Warner, 
Lawrence Cady, George MacQuesten, 
John Galski, Pierce Allen Coryell, Fred 
Brubaker, Charles Ague, and Lester 
Yarnall. 

Professor Gilbert declares he would 
like to see more Freshmen interested 
in Dtbating. 



Celebrate Hallowe'en 



s 



Updegrove and Haas to 
Sit on Student Council 



Susquehanna is invited t^ partici- 
pate with the rest of Selinsgrove in a 
gigantic Hallowe'en celebration, Thurs- 
day evening. Dean Gait will serve as 
one of the parade judges, and both the 
college and high school bands will 
march. 

The Board of Directors of the Sel- 
insgrove Community Center has in- 
vited Susquehanna University to again 
join in the annual local celebration 
which consists, in the main, of a cos- 
tume parade through the central sec- 
tions of town. 

The judges, among whom will be 
Dean Gait, will award prists for the 
largest adult group in costume, the 
most original make-ups, the best- 
dressed couple, etc. College students 
and organizations are eligible for these 
prizes. 

Parade participants must register be- 
fore six p. m„ Thursday, parade day, 
at Rea & Derick's Drug Store, Stef- 
fe»'« Grocery Store, or Wentzel's De- 
partment Store. The marchers must 
first have their costumes approved by 
the marshal or one of his staff before 
entering the parade. 

The list of prizes thus far is as fol- 
lows: the largest number of costumed 
adults as a group— fifteen dollars; the 
largest group of juniors in line, ten 
dollars; the second largest group of 
■uniors, five dollars; the most original 
make up, male or female, five dollars; 
the second most original makeup, two 
dollars; the best dressed couple, five 
dollars; the second best dressed couple 
two dollars; the best impersonator of 
a popular comic strip, five dollars; the 
second best, two dollars. 

Twenty prizes of one dollar each will 
be awarded to children with outstand- 
ing costumes. Twenty fifty-cent prizes 
will be given to noteworthy children. 
Other prizes will be announced later, 
as the prize money is contributed. 

Likewise, d^t?'!**' ni"*T: " 11 hf mnH« 
known before the parade. 
S 



DEAN GALT INFORMS FROSH AS TO 
FRATERNITY RUSHING REGULATONS 



Rushing- Season to Extend from November 26 
to December 11 With December 13 Pledging 
Date; Last Year's Methods to be Followed 

Seventy Visitors Dine In 
Horton Hall Sunday 



The Men's Bible class of the Reform- 
ed church at Red Lion was entertain- 
ed to dinner in Horton Hall by the 
same group of St. Paul's Evangelical 
and Reformed church Sunday after- 
noon. The Red Lion class visited St. 
Paul's Sunday school and morning 
worship services, returning a similar 
visit of last year when the local class 
traveled to Red Lion. 

After dinner, Which was had by spe- 
cial arrangement with tiie school au- 
thorities, Professor Brungart took the 
approximately seventy visitors on a 
tour of the campus. Later Mr. Miles 
Herrold, superintendent of St. Paul's 
Sunday school, took them for a visit 
to the State Epileptic Colony, 

Dr. George P. Dunkelberger is the 
teacher of the Men's Bible Class of St. 
Paul's church. 



Two new members have been added 
to the Men's Student Council. Last 
Wednesday morning the general stu- 
dent body cast their ballots for the 
candidates of their choice. Prom a card 
including Robert Updegrove, Michael 
Wolf, Paul Lantz, and Melvln Haas, 
two men were chosen. Robert Upde- 
grove will represent the senior class, 
and Melvin Haas will represent the 
junior class. 

The two new members were necessary 
oecause of the growing non-fraternity 
group. Henceforth the Council will con- 
sist of two men from each fraternity 
and two from the non-fraternity fac- 
tion, giving representation to all the 
men. 

S 



Former Grad Given 
Post In Local Bank 



Laird Gemberling, a graduate of 
Susquehanna in the class of 1933, was 
recently made a director of the First 
National Bank at Selinsgrove. 

While attending Susquehanna Uni- 
versity, Gemberling was editor of THE 
SUSQUEHANNA. He is also a gradu- 
ate of the Temple University Law- 
School at Philadelphia, and a leader 
of the Young Republicans Club in this 
area. 



Barked Shins and Parched Throats 
Mark Conquest of Mt. Mahanoy 






"Johnny on the spot" has scooped I 
another 250 words, (just making the j 
deadline i. with the thirty-three star 
final which was staged on the site of 
Mahanoy Mountain. 

Transportation via modern means 
was temporarily abandoned, even Scud- i 
citr's "Old Faithful" gave up; and re- 
sort was made to nature's supply of i 
shoe leather express. (Piffle! the re- j 
iiiainder of this epic will be presented 
to Kaleidoscopic fashion since my \ 
quota of space is scanty and the statis- 
tics are bulging.) 

Puff, puff, going up! Li'l Nell and ! 
Jimmy Scudder took more steps than 
Prou-Frou could count, (especially 
tines he has to use his fingers.) After 
mfinitesmal time had elapsed, the ! 
straggling group of professed woods- | 
men reached the lop, where they were ; 



hauled up, hand over hand, by Thatch- 
er, who proceeded to tanlili'.o their 
scorching tongues by barking, "Ice cold 
pop, five cents a bottle." 

Dr. Houtz and Mary Lee detected, 
through the binoculars, a button miss- 
ing on the sleeve of Cuxey's wash hang- 
ing out behind the cottage. 

The trail back led, for the more ad- 
venturesome .souls, down a slope which 
was quite wearing on Mr. Kelly's nether 
garments; but both he and Doctor 
Fisher maintained an optimistic point - 
of-view. especially when they witnessed 
the lovely panorama that WM displayed 

from the vantage point of the cliffs. 

This noble bund was courageously led 
by "Trail-Blazer." president Joe, who 
added bits of enthusiasm with war 
whoops in full-Hedged Indian manner. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Organizations Plan for 
Decorating- Contest as 
Homecoming Day Nears 

Susquehanna's leaf laden campus 
and halls of intellectual endeavors will 
again echo and re-echo with the sounds 
and activities of what is expected to 
be a great homecoming of graduates 

One of the decided improvements 
over preceding years is the new com- 
petitive decorative scheme. By this 
plan each dormitory, fraternity house, 
and sorority, plus the honor cottage 
on University Heights, will decorate to 
f heir own satisfaction with their own 
ideas. 

The results of these artistic attempts 
are then to be judged by a committee 
of three, President Smith, Dean Gait, 
and Dean Jensen. 

Formerly, any attempts at campus 
decoration were made by a group of 
vandalsi prototype, a barbarian tribe I 
and they proceeded to turn Susque- 
hanna's campus into something which 
nearly resembled a city dump. 

Various organizations will hold din- 
ners and meetings and many outstand- 
ing events are scheduled for the week- 
end. A pep jamboree will be held on 
Friday evening at seven o'clock in the 
Alumni Gymnasium with members of 
old football teams giving talks, follow- 
ed by a torch parade and a bonfire. 

On Saturday morning at 9:30 a. m. 
there will be the traditional freshman- 
sophomore football game. At 10:00 a. 
| in. there will be an all-star hockey 
match, At 12:15 p, ni. there will be 
an alumni luncheon in Horton dining 
room. Finally at 2:00 p. m. the high- 
I light of this exciting day will be the 
| grid game between Susquehanna and 
Moravian; both teams have had an 
i undefeated season to date. 

Tiie Grand Finale will be the fra- 
ternity Homecoming Dances in the 
evening. 

8 



Hutchison and Miller 
At S. G. Conference 



Last Friday and Saturday Jane 
Hutchison, president of Women's Co- 
operative Council, and Elaine Miller 
visited Grove City College, where they 
attended the Tri-State Intercollegiate 
Conference of Women's Student Gov- 
ernment. Twenty-two colleges were 
represented. 

Tiie conference opened with regis- 
tration on Friday at two o'clock In the 
beautiful Mary A. Pew Dormitory. A 
tea followed in Crawford Hall, the Ad- 
ministration building. Friday's activi- 
ties were climaxed with a formal ban- 
quet at which time the theme of the 
Conference, "Reaching For the Stars," 
was carried out by the speakers. An 
entertainment followed the banquet 
after which the girls left for their dor- 
mitories. 

Saturday morning the conference 
opened with a general meeting. At 
9:30 round table discussions were 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Dean Gait called the men of the 
freshman class in a special meeting in 
which he set forth the rules and regu- 
lations with respect to the new frat- 
ernity rushing set up. 

On November 1 those wishing to be 
rushed by a fraternity will signify their 
desire by filling out the required form 
in the registrar's office and returning 
same together with the rushing fee of 
$1.00 

On November 26 rushing begins. This 
period extends until December 11 dur- 
ing which time freshmen will be given 
the opportunity to inspect thoroughly 
each of the three fraternities and to 
participate in the activities as spon- 
sored by the fraternity groups. 

A quiet period will be observed on 
December 12 during which time no up- 
per class-men will be permitted to dis- 
cuss fraternity with those being rush- 
ed. The purpose of this period is to 
enable the rushees to be alone with 
their thoughts in making their decis- 
ion. The smokers will be held on the 
evenings of December 9-10-11 and the 
festivities will be brought to a climax 
on December 13, the date of pledging. 

Dean Gait emphasized the fact that 
one should not consider joining a fra- 
ternity without the expenditure of 
some money. In addition to the in- 
itial pledge fee of $1.00, a fee amount- 
ing to $15.00 is charged to each pledgee 
for the first year. One half of this 
fee is required on the day of pledging. 

Tire administration is hopeful that 
this plan might run harmoniously and 
that the various fraternities and fresh- 
men will endeavor to cooperate in this 
ittempt to creaks & bcttci feeLng 
among the fraternities at Susque- 
hanna. 

S 



Announce Tryouts for 
"Kind Lady" Tonight 

Tryouts for "Kind Lady" will be held 
tonight at seven in the play produc- 
tion room, G. A. 300, announces Mr. 
Kelley, head of the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity Theatre Guild. 

"Kind Lady," a sinister-peopled play 
adapted by Edward Chodorov from a 
story by Hugh Walpole, is about a 
•nlddle-aged woman who mistakenly 
jeiriended a very bad painter. The 
winter's wife and friends descend on 
lie house in droves, imprisoning the 
'kind lady," whose friends are told 
ihe has gone away. This the story of 
her imprisonment, and efforts at es- 
cape. 

Kind Lady was first produced on 
Broadway Ave years ago, with Grace 
George in the starring role, and cur- 
rently on Broadway in a revival. 



F. B. I. Agent Advocates 
Youth Guidance in Talk 



Mr. E. R. Davis, special agent of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, spoke 
to the meeting of the Selinsgrove Tri- 
angle Club on Thursday evening in 
Seibert Hall. 

Mr. Davis stated that America's 
most urgent need was the realisation 
of responsible adult leaders to the fact 
that they are needed in the guidance 
and supervision of youth in such or- 
ganizations as the Boy and Girl Scouts. 
This is mainly due to the fact that a 
tremendous amount of the crime com- 
mitted in America is perpetrated by 
young men and women under twenty- 
five years of age. 

In his introductory statements, Mr. 
Davis mentioned how the F. B. I. is 
acting to prevent sabotage and espion- 
age and that the bureau appreciates 
the great number of letters from Amer- 
I lean citizens giving information about 
; suspicious actions or people. He said 
, that the Dies Committee is responsible 
: to and working for Congress, but when- 
'■ ever cases arise wherein the F. B. I. 
may operate, these are reported and 
invest igated immediately. 

After his lecture, the meeting VH 
opened to a forum during which he 
.uiswered several questions. 



Crusaders Witness Spectacles of 
Broadway and World's Fair 



HOMECOMING ISSUE FRIDAY 

The next issue of THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA will appear next Friday, in- 
iteed of on Tuesday as regularly 
lOheduled. This change has been 
made so that the homecoming Issue 
may carry last minute news Of the 
events of Homecoming Day. Copies 
Of this issue will be distributed to 
the returning alumni. 



On the twenty -sixth day of October 
j the boys from old S. U. not only con- 
| quered the Beavers of C. C. N. Y. but 
j they entered into a Wholesale onslaught 
1 of the bm City. Toward evening the 
first division arrived by train, this 
I group dusted off the hotel and pre- 
pared the city for the expected arrival. 
Along about elght-thlrtj ia the even- 
1 ing the main body attacked using sunn' 
ot the most modern Unties Ol 'BlitS- 
kriflf" War. After getting set at the 
hotel the boys decided to do a little 

exploring, some of the boys had never 

been to tiie tall building sector before, 
unci the first view of Times Square was 
indeed a thrill. 

On the Great White Way we had 
some of the best hits Of the current 
tsaiOR, for instance the Strand was 



showing "Knute Rockne All American " 

coupled with Woody Herman's band 
Uosl of the fellows thought this was 
the best combination and took it in. 
For some of the first hand jokes, you 
can ask Coach Pritchard, he can't get 
over them. Corcoran can give you 
some first hand information on the 
communist viewpoint, for he spent the 
evening on Union Square arguing with 

one ot the boys. For first hand in- 
formation about the shops on Fifth 
Avenue shoot the questions to Nale, 
he did all the buying, 

Alter the game most of the boys had 
ticket* to the Pair at Winning Mea- 
dows. Although the evening was cold 
tiie attendance was still in the three 
hundred thousands, All la all you can 
quote tiie boys as saying. "We can't 
wait to get back." 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SEL1NSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



THE SU SQU EHANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
Intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subsci iption $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heef ner, '42, Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 

Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., 
College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle 
Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton. '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella Fetheroff, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjoiie Wolfe, '43; Catherine Dietterle, '41; Maye bnyaer, 
'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine 
Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, 
'43; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer, '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane 
Shotts, '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44. 

Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

I Fred Warner 
Advertising Managers j Chester Shusta 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, '43; Rex Sunday, '43; Dorothy Webber 
'43; Charles Ague, '44; Ralph Brown, '44; Jean Bufflngton, '44; Susanne 
Goyne, '44; Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; 
Lois Krammer, '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. 

Facuuy «xhisuis: Euuoiial, Dr. a. n. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reltz. 

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 29, 1940 

^LETTER TO THE FRESHMAN MEN 

Dean Gait has announced to the freshmen that the fra- 
ternity rushing season is to begin soon. For those of you who 
are anticipating fraternal affiliations this announcement means 
the beginning of "good times;" for the Fraternity Senate it 
means another test for the new system of fraternity govern- 
ment set up last year. 

Our wish is that each freshman man may, first of all, set 
himself straight on whether or not he will become a "fraternity 
man." This is a problem of importance and should not be tak- 
en lightly. Do you have the money? Do you wish to live in a 
fraternity house? Can you "keep straight" while living there, 
or are you like to be too easily led by the desires of the broth- 
ers? Do you like the spirit of brotherhood, as found in fratern- 
ities here, or could you do better without such affiliation? Will 
fraternity life help you develop into a well-rounded personality? 
Are you able to reconcile your parents to your decision? If after 
considering these issues you are convinced that you wish to 
consider fraternity life, then sign up and pay your rushing fee. 

Your greatest decision still remains. Which one of the 
three houses should you pledge? If only one house is rushing 
you it will be easy to decide; but the chances are strong that 
more than one house will invite you to join. Then you face a 
grave and weighty decision — one which should be made in the 
quiet of your own room, away from the heat of the campaign. 

The bases upon which your decision should be made are 
many; each year students make the big mistake of considering 
only a few of them. Ask yourself such questions as the follow- 
ing; see which house rates highest in your estimation. Do you 
like the type of person who is TYPICAL of this fraternity? Is 
he the type of man whom you should enjoy taking to your home? 
Will you enjoy and profit from having this sort of person as 
your intimate friend during your college life? Ho wmuch sham 
friendliness has this person used to impress you and to get you 
to join? Are these men rushing you because they want you as 
a brother or because they feel that you would be an "asset" to 
their fraternity? 

Can you subscribe in principle to the ideals of this fratern- 
ity, as you have been able to detect them? How much import- 
ance do you place on the size and off-campus affiliations of the 
fraternity? What is your opinion of the house, and what is its 
financial condition? Does this fraternity compare lavorably in 
costs with the others? Has this fraternity, to the best of your 
knowledge, used unfair methods in securing pledges? Will you 
be able to help the fraternity, and will you gain from having 
been a member? 

We believe that if each freshman man considers these fac- 
tors carefully before making his decision, there will be fewer 
errors in judgment than there have been in past yars. 

S 

TO A BIGGER HOMECOMING 

As the homecoming season comes round again and as the 
plans for a bigger celebration take form should we not, as in- 
dividuals, consider how best we can do our bit in making the 
day a really big event in the Susquehanna year? In past years 
a considerable number of the students, taking advantage of 
the holiday, have left the campus. This takes away a certain 
element of college atmosphere which the alumni enjoy so much 
and tends to make them feel only a passive welcome. With 
this in mind could we not arrange to stay and join in the cele- 
bration? 

As the plans indicate the homecoming will be one of the 
biggest events Susquehanna has witnessed in recent years. The 
campus will have decorations of a different tone this year as 
the various residences vie for decorating honors. The alumni 
office forecasts that the number of returning grads may exceed 
five hundred. The fraternity celebrations during the evening 
will feature events out of the ordinary. 



As its contribution to a bigger Homecoming Day THE SUS- 
QUEHANNA will release next week's issue on Friday evening 
instead of on Tuesday; extra copies will be on hand for distri- 
bution to our guests of the day. 

Many students and faculty members will have a part in 
one or more of the events of the day; everyone will have a part 
in making our guests feel welcome. Let's all join in making 
this Susquhanna's biggest Homecoming Day. 

"CRAMITIS" EPIDEMIC 



Ol' Doc Pedagogy has been having 
a very busy week because the recurrent 
nine weeks plague, tnat dreaded oram- 
itis Epidemic, is waging in all the hor- 
rible desolation wnicn one associates 
so often with the measles. 

Wnenever an epidemic occurs in such 
a small community as Selinsgrove, one 
of the first prominent signs is that of 
the quarantine notices wnicn are past- 
ed on the aoors of those sick witn the 
disease. Such a quarantine sign is the 
sight of many red, bleary eyes and 
drooping eyends on students wno, in 
addition, may exhibit a tousled head 
ano a slight dizziness. 

When tne measies go the rounds, 
little Mary and her playmate, Sue, fall 
victims to its power and they are out 
of scnool for several weeks. Now, wnen 
the cramitis fever seizes the students, 
they often miss classes, even though 
they might actually be marked present 
by the teacher. If a vacant seat doesn't 
testify to the fact that Johnny is sick, 
then the all-too-revealing vacant stare 
is the only reply the teacher may re- 
ceive to the question he has directed 
to the over-loaded head of Johnny, 
iwarms of microbes, in various shapes 
and forms of data, are floating around 
in the cranial cavity which at this 
period should be diligently occupied 
with the business of the subject at 
hand. 

As in the case of measles, so in the 
case of this ravaging fever, there is an 
incubation period dating from the day 
on which the examination period is an- 
nounced about two weeks prior to the 
exam. Then, the night before the 
exam, while the patient seems still 
normal, he attends the latest show at 
the Stanley, and without any signs of 
the impending danger returns to the 
dorm, safe and sound (presumably). 

At ten o'clock the dormant germs 
begin to warm up while Johnny gets 
into a bull session where seven-eighths 
of the discussion is gossip and one- 



eighth is study. Fatigue and head- 
aches begin to torment the poor lad 
while he stubbornly insists that he is 
quite well and only need an aspirin or 
two taken simultaneously with large 
cups of coffee, preferably black. Na- 
turally he disregards the helpful ad- 
vice about "hitting the hay early" to 
thereby ward off the disease and even- 
tually he snatches a few moments of 
broken rest after three in the morn- 
ing. 

By seven the disease may have pro- 
gressed to such a stage that Johnny 
can't appear at breakfast, but snould 
he attempt to continue a semblance 
of health he will arrive at the table 
only to discover that his appetite has 
fled in the face of the delirium which 
now sets in. This delirium manifests 
itself in the form of a oattery of ques- 
tions and facts which are fired in a 
gibberish, hodge-podge manner back 
and forth across the white table-cloth 
of "no man's land." 

By this time Johnny is almost a 
hopeless case, but very determined to 
carry the flag to the last ditch, (which 
is about all he can accomplish). He 
enters the examination room and re- 
ceives the paper of questions and then 
passes into the final stage of the dis- 
ease, that of complete unconsciousness. 
For the duration of the exam period, 
he remains in this frightful state and 
departs a pitiful ghost of his former 
exuberant self. 

The after results of the sickness are 
at times as disastrous as the crisis be- 
cause Johnny may emerge, partially, 
from the coma and encounter his best 
girl. Not having had the proper 
amount of beauty sleep, he isn't tops 
with his flattery and may end up in 
a spat with Mary. (Alas — ain't it the 
truth!) 

Now, there are the facts about the 
horrors of the epidemic which awaits 
you. You are the doctor! 
S 



"JOE AESOP SPEAKS" 



Once upon a Time there was a 
Freshman named Arlington, who, not 
too strangely, became Enamored of a 
ravishing Senior whose real name was 
Mehitable but whom everyone called 
Mettle, for Short. 

Now. Mettie really liked the Poor 
Fellow but she Knew her Public Opin- 
ion—especially when it came to the 
Freshman Girls. And who was she, 
Mettie. to esteem so lightly their 
Friendship what witli May Day only 
six months away? 

Nay, forsooth! Arlington must be 
discouraged. 

But Arlington was a tough custom- 
er. No matter what she did, he Liked 
it. 

She told him lie was tToo Young. 
Arlington didn't even resent it. 

She tried ignoring him. That 
didn't work either. 

She went out with Other Men. She 
returned his Gifts. She attempted to 
tell him, tactfully, that they should be 



Just Friends. 

It availed her nothing. Arlington 
stuck. 

Mettle was in Despair. 

"Lookit," her Roommate point out. 
"If the Sap takes all That, then it 
must be the Real Thing! Why don't 
you Go Out With Him?" 

That very evening Arlington tele- 
phoned. He asked Mettie if she would 
go with him to see "Third Toe, Left 
Foot," starring Burna Loy, his favor- 
ite actress. 

"I'd love to," she warbled. "I'll be 
down 'toute de suite'!" 

She heard Arlington Gasp. 

"Mettie!" he exclaimed Agrlly, "I 
have taken a Lot from you, but this is 
the Last Straw. I will not be called 
vicious names!" 

He Hung Up. 

Mettie staggered back to her Room 
and became Hysterical. 

Moral: A Fool and his Honey are 
Soon Parted. —Joe Aesop. 



"ODDS 'N ENDS" 



Stuff 

To all you poor suckers who have 
never won in an Irish Sweepstakes; 
your time lias come!! Tuesday is the 
day of the biggest sweepstakes that 
America has ever known. There will 
be no cash prizes, and no consolation 
prizes, but watch how lucky you are 

. The pictures of the K. D. P. in- 
itiation of last year can be had for a 
nominal fee. Boy, you should see 
Fern!!! . . . Orchids to the Crusaders 
for their showing on Saturday ... Of 
all the guys on the other team, why 
did Dick Matthews have to pick the 
boxing Champ of the school for a one- 
round playmate? . . . Roger's Rangers 
took to the hills again as Major Scud- 
der and tamily led them thru, and up 
the fever ridden jungles of Mt. Maha- 
noy. Is it true that young Miss Bru- 
baker was so tired she wanted to roll 
back down the mountain? This "Ferry- 
boat Serenade." Some tune. Especially 
by the King Sisters. That part that 
goes "Tina, Una, Una." Very popular 
number. Play Day on Saturday. Come 
out and cheer our gals on. We MUST 
beat those Cedar Cresters. End quote. 
. . . 8. U. goes Modern!! Some of the 
"boys" are actually dating two Hiier- 
ent girls and getting away with it. 
Showes to see— "Wyoming" and "Cap- 



tain Caution." Pet abhorrences — Spin- 
ach, fried onions, chamber music, Gene 
Autry, dentists, fat assignments in con- 
junction with tests, Paramount Pictor- 
ials, Chester Gump, and eight o'clock 
classes . . . Bill Gehron, "40," tells me 
to watch "When You Awake" take high 
money. Tommy Dorsey does it to the 
queen's taste, and Bill's right; it's go- 
ing up. "Falling Leaves" by Glenn 
Miller is quite seasonal and quite good. 
Many thanks, Bill. Letter soon. T. 
Dorsey will give 100 smackers to any- 
one who gives him a good tune. 
There's your chance to take care of 
part of next year's tuition. ... Up to 
the present time, my average on foot- 
ball prognostication is .5625. Is that 9 
out of 16? I ain't ashamed. In fact, 
I'll try again. F. & M. over Albright. 
Boy, do I take chances!! Susquehanna 
knocks off Allegheny by three touch- 
downs. Brown tops Yale, Northwestern 
over Minnesota and don't ask me why. 
Syracuse over Georgetown. Am I 
crazy?? Don't answer that question. 
My greatest desire right now is to have 
an action picture of the coach when 
the Zeravica to Zuback combine click- 
ed for those two passes. That sound 
he made was "Hoky Smoke." 

Olive Oyl. 



MAY WE . . 
. . SUGGEST 



TUESDAY 

Anne of Windy Poplars 

Here is a sharp contrast to most 
contemporary shows. Anne Shirley 
stars as "Anne Shirley," a young school 
teacher whose persistent friendliness 
and sweetness eventually triumph over 
the malice and envy of the small town 
in which she finds her first job. The 
plot covers the period of one school 
year which is filled with those small 
incidents of large significance that take 
real acting ability to put across. 

It's only lately that some smart pro- 
ducers have decided that there might 
be something to filming the plot and 
spirit of a good novel as well as the 
title; R. K. O. has done just that in 
"Anne cf Windy Poplars." There has 
been no streamlining of the plot, no 
modernising of the story; and the re- 
liance is upon appeal to sentiment and 
emotion thruout. 

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
Foreign Correspondent 

Joel McCrea and Laraine Day are 
featured in this job and Bob Benchley 
has a good (but too short) part. Mc- 
Crea is sent by a New York paper to 
replace their London correspondent 
and from the moment of his arrival he 
is waist deep in intrigue and adven- 
ture. A peace leader is kidnaped by a 
foreign government (guess who) and 
our hero is right on the trail. It's 
rather tough that he has to fall in 
love with the good-looking daughter of 
the arch villain, but as things turn out 
an Atlantic Clipper is shot down and 
a. v. makes the supreme sacri.lce— 
saving everyone on board. McCrea 
marries the g. 1. d. and in the final 
scene he broadcasts a message to 
America from the midst of a London 
blackout. 

FRIDAY 
Hired Wife 

Secretary-boss comedy in the best 
traditions. Briane Aherne is a cement 
magnate whose only weakness is far 
blondes, every spring. Rosalind Rus- 
sel is right in the groove as the super- 
efficient secretary who tries to keep 
her boss for ruin as he tries to get 
Virginia Bruce to pose for the front 
of a concrete bag. Her loyalty even 
goes as far as having her marry the 
boss when his company is about to go 
on the rocks— of course the marriage 
is nothing personal and it is even quite 
annoying until the two principals fall 
in love. 

SATURDAY 
Triple Justice 

Here's your Saturday night saga of 
the sagebrush, boys. Lots of shooting, 
riding, and all the trimmings; and to 
make it a little different George 
O'Brien gets himself hitched before the 
fadeout. Get there early to avoii the 
rush and don't stamp your feet or the 
usher will toss you out on your ear. 

MONDAY 
Doomed to Die 

It should have been doomed to die 
before it ever left the cutting room. 
Boris Karloff is the amaring Mr. Wong 
who solves murder, settles tong wars, 
and makes strong men sleep like 
babies. 

TUESDAY 

The Man Who Talked Too Much 

The story of the assistant D. A. who 
becomes the mouthr-lece for an under- 
world gang is convincing told with 
Georae Brent as too billing. Brent 
took the job in order to send his young- 
er brother to school; and after the 
boy graduates, he turns incriminating 
evidence over to the government con- 
cerning the boss of the gang. Brent 
saves his brother from a framed mur- 
der charge and lncidently does one 
fine bit of acting in that final court- 
room scene. 

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 
City for Conquest 

If it were not for James Cagney and 
Ann Sheridan this picture mi-?ht have 
been just another cornev tear-jerker. 
Cagney is the lad from the East Side 
who seeks fame in the prise ring and 
Miss Sheridan is out to conquer the 
city with her dancing. Comes the end 
with Cagney, punch-drunk and prac- 
tically blind, realiing that his con- 
quest of the city has been through the 
fine music which he has helped his 
younger brother create. 

■ «■ * 

FRIDAY 

Dr. Kildare Goes Home 

If you've seen one Dr. Kildare pic- 
ture you've seen them all. In this one 
the doctor goes back to his home town 
and opens a dime-a-week clinic; the 
townspeople scoff, but he saves a boy's 
life and when the picture ends every- 
body is happy. Except me. 









TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 






THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<?>- 



They Are Likely to Give Trouble Saturday 




Unbeaten Crusaders 
Drill for Allegheny 



-$, — 



Co-captains Clarke Saylor and Ralph Marasco have shouldered a lot of the 
responsibility of building up the numerical strength and morale of the 
1940 squad. Saylor, a senior, commands the Allegheny defenses from the 
center position. Marasco, a junior, directs the 'Gator attack, calling sig- 
nals from the fullback post. 



BRILLIANT passing featured in 

SATURDAY'S VICTORY OVER C. C. N. Y. 



Crusaders Defeat the Lavender in Last Period 
Rally to Bring Home 14-7 Victory; Zeravica to 
Zuback Combination Results in Both Tallies 

Shines ?t Tackle Post 



Two long final period passes which 
caught the City College of New York 
defense napping, enabled the Susque- 
hanna University football team to stay 
among the nation's unbeaten teams, as 
the Crusaders took a 14-7 decision be- 
fore 3000 fans in Lewisohn Stadium 
N. Y., Saturday. 

Although Bennny Frisdman's men 
rolled up seven first downs in the first 
half, the homesters failed to get closer 
than the Crusader's 22 yard marker, 
from which point an attempted field 
goal fell short. A break on a f Jinbled 
punt gave Susquehanna the ball on 
City College's twenty, late in the op- 
ening canto, but running plays were 
stopped cold and Heaton's attempted 
placement was short. Midway in the 
second quarter, a pass into the flat 
from Helm to Lyons found the latter 
in the clear, but after a thirty jaunt 
the local back was run out cf bounds 
in midfield. The first half ended with 
neither team talljing a marker. 

The home team broke the salemate 
early in the third session when Romero 
ran Zubcck's kickoff from his own 10 
to the Susquehanna 45 yard line. May- 
hew, a great halfback for the metros, 
skirted left end on a reverse to the 
local 26 yard stripe. At this point the 
Staggmen were penalLed 15 yards for 
roughness. From the 10 yard stripe I 
an end around play with Von Frank j 
lugging the ball placed the pigskin on '■ 
the Crusader 1 yard marker. Mayhew 
was stopped at the line of scrimmage 
but on the fourth down, Romero 
hurdled the line to score for the home 
team Von Frank place-kicked the ex- 
tra point. During the remaining min- 
utes of the third period, the Lavender 
held the Staggmen with ease and as 
the quarter ended it was Susquehanna's 
ball on its own 23 yard line. 

On the opening play of the final 
starra, Helm picked up five yards off 
tackle. On the next play Steve Zera- 
vica faded back and threw a long pass 
Intended for John Zuback. The ball 
bounced off Romero's shoulder into 
Zuback's arms, the latter stumbled mo- 
menta! lly but then raced some fifty 
odd yards to tally for the locals. Heat- 
on's placement tied the score, 7-7. 

After Zuback's kickofT went out of 
bounds on the thirty, an exchange of 
punts brought the ball Into possession 
of the Crusaders on their own 25 yard 
stripe. Zeravica rolled up two first 
downs for the locals in rapid succes- 
sion and it appeared as though the 
visiting eleven was on the march. 
However, the Crusaders broke the run- 
ning routine as Zeravica again faded 




Fresh from their victory over C. C. 
N. Y. last Saturday, the Crusaders will 
play their last away game against Alle- 
gheny College at Meadville this week- 
end. This will be the second gridiron 
tussle between the two schools, rela- 
tions having started last year with 
Susquehanna taking the opener, 20-0. 

The "Gators," coached by Carl J. 
Lawrence, have a small squad, but were 
fortunate in having nine lettermen 
around which to build a team this fall. 
Pour of these are backfield men while 
the other five play on the line. These 
veterans have been supplemented by 
several promising players from last 
year's freshman team. In Co-Captain 
Ralph Marasco and George Hartwell, 
Allegheny has a pair of capable backs, 
while Co-Captain Ray Saylor and Gil 
L.ong do yoeman's work on the line. 

With Larry Isaacs back in shape, 
the Orange and Maroon football ma- 
chine should be ready to go places In 
the coming scrap. Steve Zeravica and 
Johnny Zuback, the boys who showed 
up so well in the C. C. N. Y. game, are 
expected to give their usual stellar per- 
formances. The lack of injuries in the 
last game should also aid the Cru- 
saders. 

Allegheny has played four games this 
season. Allegheny has lost four games 
this season. This leads one to deduct 
that Susquehanna's undefeated string 
will continue. 

Glancing at the fates of our future 
opponents this past weekend, we find 
that Allegheny lost to Hiram 28-0, 
while Moravian trampled Hartwick, 
36-0; both these teams are on the Cru- 
sader card for coming games. 



-S- 



DICK MATTHEWS 
220-pound crusader tackle, who reach- 
ed a rew height in his hard-hitting 
defence play against O. C. N. Y. last 
Saturday 

back to pass and again spotted Zuback 
in the open. The latter caught the 
ball on the dead run and behind beau- 
tiful blocking, raced 47 yards to put the 
men of Stagg in the lead. Heaton 
igain booted the extra point. 

Interference on a pass gave the Lav- 
ender the ball on Susquehanna's 30 in 
he closing minutes, but Fletcher bat- 
ed a Romero pass into Phil Templin's 
hands and the final two minutes the 
Trusaders held the ball. 

Zeravica, Helm, and Zuback sparked 
the Crusaders on the offensive while 
Fletcher, Campana, and Heaton re- 
peatedly threw the Friedman proteges 
for losses. Romero and Mayhew led 
the attack for the home team. 

Lineups: 

Susquehanna City College 

Greco L. E Von Frank 

R. Matthews ... L. T Alevhon 

Campana L. G Strahl 

Templln O Gmitro 

J. Matthews ... R, G Rosenfeld 

Fletcher R. T Boye 

Heaton R. E Dougherty 

Zuback Q. B Romero 

"elm L. H Aronson 

Wos R. H Mayhew 

Zeravica F. B Goeschel 



Preparations Made 
For Hockey Play Day 

Next Saturday is the day scheduled 
for the Hockey Play Day which Is to 
be held at Susquehanna this year. Leb- 
anon Valley, Cedar Crest, and Ship- 
pensburg are to be represented and 
about sixty girls are expected to be 
here. The Play Day is sponsored by 
the W. A. A. and plans are under way 
to make this a big day for Susque- 
hanna. 

The visitors will arrive in the morn- 
ing in time to register at 10 o'clock, 
following registration the games will 
begin at 10:30. The opponents for the 
wo games in the morning are chosen 
)y drawing straws, while the oppon- 
ents of the afternoon games are the 
wo teams which won in the morning 
IBd the two teams which lost in the 
morning. After the first two hockey 
^ames each girl in W. A. A. Is assigned 
to take care of two visitors and show 
them around the campus. At 12:33 
he hockey teams will eat together In 
he dining room after which a pro- 
ram will be given by members of the 
W. A. A. The afternoon games begin 
it 2:15 and at 4:30 a tea will be given 
in Seibert Hall parlors for the visitors. 

Miss Shure has not yet announced 
he players who will make up our own 
nockey team; but practice has been 
called for every evening this week, and 
the line-up will be chosen later. The 
following girls are candidates: Hutchi- 
son, Welsh, McWllliams, Fenner, West, 
Brand, Heefner, Hoover, Gait, Poor- 
baugh, Crompton, Davis, Reltz, Ben- 
nage, Bauman, Cox, Grothe, Krumb- 
holz, Crow, Leffler, Crawford, Warner, 
.ind Zaremba. 

Everyone is invited to attend the 
Hockey Play Day and help make it a 
big day for Susquehanna. 



When you thli'k of Photograph; 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunhnry, Pa 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 



BINGAMAN'S SS5, 

Sandwiches— Hot Beef. Ham. Efj;/ 

Weiner. Cheese, Hambrrger 

Vegetable Sorp. Baked Beans, 

Ice Cream 

1 W. PINE ST. SELINSGROVE 



Phi Mu Delta Downed by 
Scrappy Freshmen, 12-0 

The scrappy freshman touch football 
team remained very much in the run- 
ning for the championship by scoring 
i 12-0 victory over favored Phi Mu 
Delta. The game was played last Wed- 
nesday and placed the two teams in a : 
deadlock for the league leadership. 

After a keenly contested first per- i 
iod, the uncanny aerial attack of the j 
class of '44 began to click. Ralph ; 
Brown flipped a long heave to Jim ! 
Clark for the game's first tally, and j 
thereafter the frosh dominated play. 
Bill Jansen snared a pass from Glenn 
Schueler for the clinching score. 

As is the case with any consistent 
winner in sporting events, the fresh- 
men realiie that their continued suc- 
cess is due to the everlasting teamwork 
of each member. 

In racking up their third win in four 
starts the ceaseless effort and indomit- 
able spirit of Glenn Schueler, Roy Gut- 
shall, Jim Clark, Ralph Brown, Marlin 
Bollinger, Ray Hochstuhl, Bill Jansen. 
and Dave Lohman proved to be the 
deciding factor. 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FIOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 



JEWELER 



SELINSGROVE, PA. 



strand 

I ti t 4 T fi f 
sunbury 



NOW SHOWING 

Gary Ccoper 
Walter Brennan 

in 

'The Westerner" 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

Tyrone Power 
Linda Darnell 



in 



"Brigham Young" 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

James Stewart 
Rosalind Russell 

in 

"No Time for 
Comedy" 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., S-nbvry. Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The 3&*a££ Stan 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA 



STEFFENS 

FINE FOODS— STATIONER Y 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



i'.f] 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

JOEL McCREA LARAINE DAY 

HERBERT MARSHALL 

"Foreign 
Correspondent" 

FRIDAY 

ROSALIND RUSSELL 

BRIAN AHERNE 

VIRGINIA BRUCE 

'Hired Wife" 

SATURDAY 
GEORGE O'BRIEN 

Triple Justice" 

MONDAY 

BORIS KARLOFF 

MARJORIE REYNOtPS 

Doomed to Die" 

TUFSDAY 
GEOROE BPENT 
VIRGINIA BRUCE 

Man Who Talked 
Too Much" 

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 

Noven-rer 6-7 
JAMFS CA<"-*'EY 
ANNE SHERIDAN 

'Citv for (V quest' 

FRIDA V NOV^iw^ER 8 

»EW AVFFS 

LIONFi PARRVMORE 

LAPATNE DAY 

Dr. Kildare Gees 
Home" 



>i 



HACKETT'S 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St 706 Market St 

SUNBURY — MIDDLEBURG 



THE P>ON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS. DRESSES. HATS 

Sunhury, Pa. 



TYDOL 



\ htlHJI 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut S'reet. Srllnsgrnve Pa 





H. K. \V i IMCH LINE 




fries to give (he (nllcp Stiidcnt- 


1 


'he he»t service. especi'iH? (he «»uii 




'■urn Sli-oVfls Whv TRAVKI will. 




in indivirti'al The Coach line In 




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PAGE I OIK 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSUKOVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1940 



Preparations Begun OVER THE 

On Frosh-Soph Game I. . AIR WAVES 



Feverish Activity Characterise! Pre- 
liminary Plans as Froth Hope lor 
First Victory Since 1928 



Ernest preparations for the yearly 
freshman-sophomer football game one 
ol the highlights of Homecoming Day. 
are making rapid progress. The game 
will be played on the morning of No- 
vember 9 as a preliminary event to the 

big afternoon Moravian-Susquehatma 
game. Interest is at a high pitch and 
indications are that it will be the mosl 
bitterly fought "frosh-soph" contest in 
history. 

At any rate, the fray will not be | 
lacking in age-old tradition and color. | 
It, no doubt, will be one of those "knock j 
'em down, drag 'em out" tussles worthy 
of the casual observation of many of 
the faculty, alumni, students and 
friends. 

The games object is to enable stu- 
dents who are not out for the varsity 
football team and who otherwise would 
have no opportunity to play in a tegu- 
lar grid game to realize through actual 
participation the genual concept of 
tootball. Therefore. Coaches Stagg, 
Jr.. and Pritchard started teaching the 
two teams the fundamentals today. 
They intend to hold regular practice 
periods and to teach each team any 
types of plays that may be desired. 

Dating from 1922. the sophomores 
boast of seven victories and only two 
defeats, while three games have ended 
in deadlocks. The last victory record- 
ed by the Irosh WSJ it! 1928. Last 
year found the sophomores tallying a 
convincing 19-0 win. The highest score 
of the series was racked up in 1929 
when the sophomores ran up a 28-0 
margin. All in all, it looks as though 
a close and exciting game is on tap. 

The aggressive freshman team al- 
ready has three workouts under its 
belt, while the sophomores have com- 
pleted two highly satisfactory prac- 
tices. 

Commenting on the game. Coaches 
Shusta and Deardorff both expressed 
their enthusiasm over the large and 
spirited squad that greeted them at the 
first freshman workout last Thursday 
afternoon. Altho a little along the op- 
timistic side, your reporter recorded 
the following statement by Head Coach 
Ohet Shusta: The '40 freshman team 
will, without doubt, go down in history 
as one of the greatest aggregations that 
has ever been put on the field. The 
sophomores can expect a crushing de- 
tea 1 . It is true that the sophomore 
team won last year, but I feel confi- 
dent that this year the tables will be 
turned." 

Assistant Coach Earl Deardorff add- 
ed, "We expect to put I team on the 
field Which, although II may be lighter 
and more inexperienced, is expected 
to outplay the sophomores in every de- 
partment by the use of a wide variety 
of trick plays, This team will have as 
its objective another froth vacation." 
The sophomore coaches, Tom Lewis 
and Out Kaufman, as jret have made 
no pro-game comments; however, if 
the whispers going ihe rounds are any 
indication oi their team's prepared- 
ness, woe be untu those froth I 

Among the first candidates to re- 
port for the freshman learn were Dave 

Lohman, Bill Jansen, Ernie liodner, 
Jim Clark Ralph Brown, Glenn 
Bchueler, Kay Hochatuhi Phil Adoni- 

do, Marliu Bollinger, Hoy Gutshall, 

Stuard Fllcltinger, and Frank Attlnger 

The sophomore candidates known 
thus far ai John HUgUS, John Wolte. 

Chuck Qundrum, Jim Mllford, Sid 
Kemberung, Ed James, John Walsh, 

and Bill Curry 



Beginning this week we shall in- 
clude in "Over the Air Waves" not 
only the review of the Invitation to 
Learning number being presented by 
Columbia on Sunday atfernoon, but 
also a brief program of the most out- 
standing of music and literary pre- 
si ntations during the coming week. 
We encourage each student to listen-in 
on as many of these programs as pos- 
sible with the aim of gaining real en- 
joyment and at the same time an ap- 
preciation for the great works of art 
to Which men of all ages have con- 
tributed. 

The number to be presented over the 
Columbia Broadcasting System Sun- 
day afternoon, November 3. from 4:30 
to 5 p. m. is Michael de Montaigne's 
"Essays." 
Michael De Montaigne— Essays 

Montaigne's motto. "What do I 
know?", is characteristically a ques- 
tion. For he loved questions, and as a 
writer of essays— the original meaning 
of the word was "attempts"— he en- 
joyed the pursuit of the answer more 
than he did the answer itself. He was, 
m ether words, a skeptic, and he has 
been called not only the first but easily 
the best of his tribe. A skeptic by his 
definition would not be one who be- 
lieves nothing but one who believes 
everything or who at any rate tries to 
do so. Montaigne, a citizen of the 
Renaissance and of France, was so 
much at home in the realm of specu- 
lation that he preferred never to leave 
it. His pleasure was to play with Ideas, 
and his delight was the differences 
among men. His own personality, 
which the -Essays" richly if modestly 
declare, was so charming that many of 
his readers are devoted to it alone; but 
he would have preferred that their de- 
votion be given as his was to the per- 
ennially varying spectacle which men 
present. His scholarship was that of 
one who wanted to see from books 
vhat men used to be like; and his in- 
terest in his own times was an interest 
in their variety. Comparative in his 
rtew, he was one of the first anthro- 
pologists; indulgent by temperament 
and by choice, he was a forerunner of 
the principle of tolerance ; brilliant and 
unassuming, he remains one of the 
nost engaging of all ancient or mod- 
ern writers. 



Win Over Freeburg 
Opens Hockey Season 

Last Wednesday afternoon Susque- 
hanna's soccer team got away to a 
flying start by beating Freeburg 6-0 on 
the home field. Our team has, for the 
past week or more, been practicing dur- 
ing their spare moments. The team is 
centered around such veterans as Bob 
Updegrove, George Herman, Dick 
Hersey, and John Hugus. Other Cru- 
saders that aided in the victory are: 
Fred Warner. Charlie Ague, Jim How- 
ell, Wilmer Grimm, Frank Attinger, 
John Wolfe, Fred Krebbs, and Warren 
Harold. Other players who are ex- 
pected to see action this season are: 
Melvin Jones, Don Stiber, Jason Shaef- 
er, and Ken dinger. The fellows are 
trying hard to schedule games for the 
season. This year's team shows prom- 
ise of great improvement over last 
year's team. 

S 

Juniors Work Toward 
More Colorful Lanthorn 



Nancy Griesemer. editor-in-chief of 
the 1942 Lanthorn. announced that 
this year's book is entirely different 
and unique in relation to those of pre- 
vious years. Several new features will 
be included: the Band Festival will be 
presented as well, also, the group of 
Seniors just lecently elected to the 
Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. 

To date, all individual pictures have 
been taken and by the end of Wednes- 
day the group pictures will be com- 
plete. 

Predictions for a more colorful book 
are in order due to the fact that the 
entire school season will be portrayed. 

An innovation will be the dedication 
about which only the Junior class offi- 
cers and the faculty advisor have any 
cognizance since it is the purpose of 
the staff that it should remain a secret 
until the publication of the Lanthorn 
is released. 

S 



Dr. Wilson Speaks at 
Educational Convention 



The state convention of secondary 
education was in session Thursday and 
Friday of last week at the Forum build- 
ing in Harrisburg, Penna. Dr. J. Er- 
nest Wagner, Superintendent of 
Schools of Johnstown, Penna., is the 
president of the roganization. 

Susquehanna University was repre- 
sented at the convention by Dr. Ar- 
thur Wilson. Dr. Wilson participated 
in a panel discussion on the relation 
of English in the high school to Eng- 
lish in the college. Dr. Cline of Get- 
tysburg College also was a member of 
the panel. Gettysburg and Susque- 
hanna were the only Liberal Arts col- 
leges represented at this meeting. 



Alfred Wallenstein's Symphonic 
Strings: WOR, 8:30-9 p. m., Tuesday. 

Ray Heatherton, baritone, and Fran- 
ces Langford, contralto, sing with Ray- 
mond Paige's Orchestra on Musical 
Americana: WEAF, 10:30-11 p. m„ 
Wednesday. 

Walter Damrosch conducts the NBC 
Music Appreciation Hour: WJZ, 2-3, 
Friday. 

NBC Symphony Orchestra; Hans 
Wilhelin Steinberg conducts: WJZ. 10- 
11:30 p. m„ Saturday. 

Symphony Orchestra; Reginald 
Stewart, conductor: WABC, 9, Sunday. 

Drama: 

First Nighter Drama: WABC. 8:30-9 
p. m., Tuesday. 

Great Plays: Marlowe's Dr. Faustus: 
WJZ. 3-4, Sunday. 

S 

I)r Luther Reed Speaks 
About "(iifts of Cod" 



A professor of economics at one of 
the large mid-western universities 
summoned a socially prominent co-ed 
to his office. Her work, he pointed out, 
was not satisfactory. 

"I just can't seem to understand or 
become interested in the course. But," 
she said pointedly, "I would do almost 
anything to keep from flunking." 

Abashed, the professor riffled the 
papers in his desk. 

"Er— what are you doing tonight?" 
he asked quite as pointedly. 

"Nothing." 

"Then," said the professor, "why 
don't you study economics?" 



Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



For festive occasions 




Vespers this evening were led by 
Harold Mitman. The guest speaker of 
the evi Ding was Dr. Luther Keed, presi- 
dent ol Mt. Any Seminary. 

Dr. Heed spoke of the fact that God 
lias given us two great, gilts lilt' and 
line. We should use our life now by 
building lor OUT future life on four 
foundation stones. These "stones" are: 
friendship, scholarship, character, and 
spiritual reality. 

At the close Of Dr. Reed's address 
Clyde Bechler sang "My Heart Has a 
Thirst for God." 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Reichley's 
SHOE SHINE 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa, 



ROYAL Portable TVI'EWRITERS 
STATIONERY SUPPLIES 

JOS. S. MENTZ 

''Mi Market Square 
Sunbury, I'euna. 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



Sunbury (oca Cola 
Bottling Works 

SI NB1 Rl 

h. i*. o. Edwards, Manager 



WHITELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



See 

MADEMOISELLE 

Styles 

Come to Life hi 

LIEB'S 

I or Things That Are Different" 
SlNBl KY, PENNA. 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG, PA. 
A fully accredited theological in- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

K<>r Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



Markley-Altvater 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 
BETTER CLOTHES 

Sunbury, Pa. 



HUTCHISON AND MILLER 
AT S. G. CONFERENCE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
started. Some of the topics discussed 
were World Affairs, Honor Systems, 
Coordinating Activities Between Board- 
ing and Day Students, Financing an 
Association, Freshman Orientation, 
and Special Programs. 

Luncheon was served in Colonial 



Hall followed by the general meeting 
to end the conference at which time 
summaries of the various discussions 
were given. 

Many ideas about student governing 
were received by the delegates and they 
believe that they can benefit by them. 
They also feel that they have given 
useful information to some of the dele- 
gates from other schools. 

S 

BARKED SHINS AND PARCHED 
THROATS MARK CONQUEST OF 
MT. MAHANOY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
One note of comments, this reporter 
should have been forearmed with the 
new knee-length socks that were worn 
to great advantage by Ellen Russell, 
although it wasn't much help when one 
merely lets gravity have rough-shod 
sway. 

Despite Mussel's absent-minded con- 
centration we all returned safely to 
terra flrma — S. U. 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBl'RY 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

CHILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining- Service 

29 N. Market St. Selinsgrove, Pa. 




SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students' Accounts 









FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SelinsgTove, Pa. 

An accredited co-tducatlonal college offering the followtng standard 
courses: — 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

RE-MEDICAL. PRE-DENTAL. PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD„ Prea 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



Hester Hoffman 
200 N. Broad St. 






Welcome 
Back 
Grads 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Good 

Luck 

Crusaders 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA. 



FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 



194(1 



NumVr 13 



Susquehanna Enjoys 
Famous Grid History 



Decorating Head Dr. Bateman Speaks figures In Homecoming Celebration Tomorrow 

At Pi Gamma Mu 



Fifty-Two Years of Football Includes | 
Victories Over Cornell, Fordham. ! 
Army; "Play Game for Sport" Policy j 



Five triumphs and a deadlock! Yes, I 
-his constitutes the most unusual rec- | 
ord of Susquehanna's high flying 1940 
Crusaders. Therefore, the Homecom- 
ing Day gridiron classic on University 
Field here tomorrow afternoon with 
the unbeaten, untied Moravian Grey- 
hounds will be a truly great feature. 

Hurriedly let us delve into the past 
football history of Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. We are amazed at the great 
idvance made in the physical plant, 
including the athletic facilities which 
are a far step from the time when the 
first teams played in nearby corn-stub- 
bled fields. 

Organized athletics, as now found 
here, had their beginning back in the 
days of Missionary Institute. What 
was then known as Missionary Insti- 
tute first inaugurated football as a 
college game on Columbus Day, Octob- 
er 12, 1892. in a contest waged with 
the Sunbury Athletic Club. After the 
last rush had been made amid the 
shouts of triumph, the first Crusader 
gridiron victors were carried from the 
field upon the shoulders of an exultant 
(Continued on Page 4) 
S 

Dunkelberger Given 
Educational Office 




DK. JOriN J. HOUlZ 
Prof. John J. Houtz is faculty advisor 
of the Men's Student Council which 
is introducing the idea of competitive 
decorating for Homecoming Day. 
Jce Greco, '41, introduced the idea to 
the Council. 



Dr. George Dunkelberger has Just 
been recently appointed the Pennsyl- 
vania member on the Committee on 
Professional Ethics for school teachers 
in the United States according to the 
announcement of Dr. Donald Dushane 
president of the National Educatior 
Association, and superintendent of 
schools at Columbus, Ind. 

Dr. Dukelberger's entire life has been 
devoted to teaching which has been in 
the rural schools, public schools, nar- 
mal schools, and colleges. He served 
as dean of the college at Susquehanna 
for nine years until he resigned to de- 
vote full time to classroom instruction 
and writing. 

At present Dr. Dunkelberger heads- 
up a number of important committees 
for the Pennsylvania Association of 
Liberal Arts Colleges and is the chair- 
man of a committee which prepared 
the "Five Year Plan" of education leg- 
islation. He is recognized as an out- 
standing educator and psychologist 
and has been a leader of psychological 
research in education for many years. 
S 

Bonsall and Fisher Made 
Student Band Directors 



Students Compete In 
Beautifying Campus 



Mondav evening, November 4 Dr. 
Sydney Bateman of Sunbury spoke to 
the Biemic society OH the subject. 
Thomas Edison As I Knew Him." Dr. 
Bateman was associated with Edison 
when he was experimenting with the 
first electric light plant in Sunburv. He 
began working with Edison on July 5, 
1R83. Sunbury has the distinction of 
having the first plant in the world to 
operate on the three wire system and 
it alsc was the first plant in this sec- 
| tion to demonstrate lighting by the in- 
candescent system. Dr. Bateman told 
the group that the reason the station 
\ Was situated in Sunbury was that cheap 
| fuel was available, a town was wanted 
I n which they could compete with gas,, 
i tnd that men lived in Sunbury whoj 
j had faith in Edison and his accom- j 
plishments. 

Dr. Bateman said in opening that 
there is much that is to be done, there 
are greater depths to be sounded, and 
greater heights to be attained than 
ever before and it is the student, whom 
he termed "the pioneer of today," who 
has that task before him. 

Dr .Bateman told how the young Ed- 
ison was thought peculiar, how he 
worked and struggled until at the age! 
Of thirty-six he had already patented j 
250 inventions. He told of his terrific 
capacity for work and his great power ' 
of concentration that led him to be- 
come one of the famed men of the 
ages. At the same time he pointed out 
that Edison had nothing not possessed 





DR. G. MORRIS SMITH CALVIN V. ERDLY 

Dr. Smith, now in his thirteenth year as president of the university will wel- 
come the returning alumni at the luncheon In Horton Dining Room to- 
morrow neon; Calvin V. Erdly, president of the Alumni Association and 
superintendent of schools in Lewistown, will give brief remarks on behalf 
of the "grads." 



RECORD NUMBER OF ALUMNI RETURN 
FOR BIG HOMECOMING CELEBRATION 



In closing, the speaker said, "Edi- 
son was great because he devoted his 
skill to help human need, he was great 
because he was as humble as a child, 
and because he was a friend of man." 
S 

Kelly Chooses Cast 
For Play 'Kind Lady' 



Today all the girls and fellows are 
busy putting the finishing touches to 

he decorations for Homecoming. This ^y the average person; he merely used 
year a new idea of decorating build- tnes€ simple talents, 
ngs is being used to welcome the 
alumni. 

The decorations are to be finished by 
J o'clock this evening and in case of 
rain 10 o'clock on Saturday morning. 

A plaque will be awarded at the 
lance this evening for the best decor- 
ited building. The judges are: Miss 
Jensen, Dean Gait, and Mr. Marlon S. 
Schoch, a prominent citizen of Selins- 
grove. 

The campus entrance was decorated 
iy the girl day students and the back 
"4 Hassinger Hall by the men day stu- 
dents, while the occupants of Seibert, 
Hassinger, and Selinsgrove Halls and 
he Cottage were adorned by residents 
~>f the respective buildings. The Men's 
Music Guild and the S. A. I. fixed the 
Conservatory. The W. A. A. changed 
'he gym's appearance. Each of the 
'raternities, Phi Mu, Beta Kappa, and 
lend and Key ornamented their own 
building. 

S 

Lawrence Cady Presents 
Review in Phi Kappa 



Grothe and Paulik Win 
Student Council Seats 



Alumni Secretary Pre- 
dicts Over 500 Will Re- 



McWilliams and Sechler Given Lead- 
ing Roles in Season Opener by Sus- 
quehanna Players 



Election of student conductor of the 
band was held at band rehearsal last 
Tuesday evening. Kenneth Bonsall was j committees were appointed to sponsor 



Phi Kappa held its meeting on Tues- 
1ay evening in the Greek room in G. 
A. Hall 

Club president, Mary Emma Yoder, . 
conducted the business portion of the Chodorov from Hugh Walpole I sti ange 



Louise McWilliams and Clyde Sech- 
ler have the leading roles in "Kind 
Lady," Mr. Walter Kelley, adviser to 
the theatre guild, announced Saturday. 
Louise will play the "Kind Lady." 
Clyde will act the part of Henry, a 
smooth villain in the play which is 
currently being revived on Broadway. 

Others in the cast are Doris Trainer. 
Fred Brubaker, Blanche Forney. 
George MacQuesten, Dorothy Paulik, 
Paul Shatto, Janice Crawford, Ellen 
Russell, Maryruthe Sell, Lawrence 
Cady, Ruth Schwenk, and Pierce Allen 
Coryell. 

"Kind Lady" was adapted by Edward 



meeting during which time several story 



chosen for the post by his fellow mem- 
bers; Neil Fisher was elected assistant 
.student conductor. 

It Is the duty of the student con- 
ductor to take charge of the band in 
the absence of the regular conductor 
and to act as band librarian. 



the Club's social activities for the pre- 
sent year. 

The speaker of the evening was Law- 
rence Cady who presented a review of 
Will Durant's "The Life of Greece." 

Mr. Cady pointed out the style and 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Pattern of Precedents Revealed In 
Survey of Homecoming Traditions 



Saturday is Homecoming. The old 
grads will be back with wives, hus- 
bands, future students, and memories. 
Homecoming is a big day at Susque- 
hanna ;and over the years its celebra- 
tion has not, in the large pattern, 
changed too much. There's a football 
game, a meal, and, somewhere in be- 
tween, speeches, teas, and dances, and 
prominent grads. 
1 935 

Five years ago a variation of the 
usual Friday-night-before-Homecom- 
ing was tried out. Instead of the usual 
bonfire, a torchlight parade through 
every cranny of Selinsgrove was substi- 
tuted. Long lines of students leaping 
and howling, and brandishing their 
torches followed the band( and a State 
Highway cop who was seeing to the 
safe*y of cars that might inadvertently 
get In the way) all over town and back 
to Pine Lawn, which was serenaded. 
Students, still unworn then, danced in 
the gym for the benefit of band uni- 
forms. 



five years ago. 
-S- 



Two new members were elected to|tum; Program Given 

the Women's Student Council in chapel | 
on Wednesday morning. The new re- 
presentatives are Cornelia Grothe, 
sophomore, and Dorothy Paulik, fresh- 
man. 

The voting was done only by the 
members of the two classes affected; 
the girls who were on the ballot were: 
Mary Cox and Dorothy Dellecker, soph- 
omores; Jean Buffintcn and Martha 
Jane Jacobs, fieshmen. 



-s 



S. U. Band Participates 
In Hallowe'en Parade 



Next day. Saturday, November 2, 
Captain Walt Wasilewski and Jim Rit- 
ter and Tom Valunas mow assistant 
coach at the local high school) and 
Tom Lewis, romped up and down the j Governor 
field, dismaying Washington, 12-0. 

The game over, the sororities gave 
teas; and the fraternities held dances 
that night. 
1936 

Next year, the torchlight parade was 
abolished, and an "Old Clothes Dance" 
was sponsored by the Men's Student 
Council in its place. "The Susque- 
hanna" for that period does not state 
the dance was so labelled out of neces- 
sity. 

Saturday, November 7, 1936, after an 
alumni luncheon, Susquehanna beat 

Princeton's second team, 13-6. Harry ! able day by having an alumni lunch- 
Swope, Pete Shuty, Tom Valunas, and j eon at 11:00 a. m. at the fraternity 



Fraternities Finish 
Plans for Alumni 

Susquehanna's three fraternal organ- 
izations, Beta Kappa, Bond and Key 
and Phi Mu Delta, are busily making 
plans in anticipation of the homecom- 
ing of the formerly graduated mem- 
bers of the brotherhood*. Each fra- 
ternity, decorated for festivities, ex- 
pects large numbers of alumni to re- 
turn to their campus homes. 

Phi Mu Delta is celebrating the 25th 
anniversary of its founding by ban- 
queting in princely style at the Hotel 
Snyder tomorrow evening 
The wives and sweethearts of the 
alumni are to be entertained later in 
the evening at the chapter house. Art 
Wendell's orchestra has been engaged 
to furnish the music for the dance. 
Dan MacCartney is social chairman. 

Bond and Key has arranged a pleas- 
ing program for the entertainment of 
its guests. There the dancers will trip 
the light fantastic to the music of 
Howard Gale's orchestra from Harris- 
burg, according to social chairman 
Melvin Jones. 

Beta Kappa has planned an enjoy 



Susquehanna helped Selinsgrove 
celebrate Hallowe'en Thursday even- 
ing. Dean Gait served as one of the 
parade judges, and the college band 
marched down the street, played, and 
then marched on again. Individual stu- 
dents clustered about Reichley's and 
watched. 

Dean Gait judged parade contest- 
ants from the second floor balcony of 
the Hotel Governor Snyder, where he 
and the other judges were perched. 
Afterwards Dean Gait wiped his fore- 
head, grinned wearily, and said. "That 
was some parade, wasn't it?" 

The University Band joined with 
the high school band for a public con- 
cert. Under the direction of Mr. El- 
rose A. Allison, the band members 
formed a large oval before the judges' 
stand and played marching and patri- 
otic airs. 

Between band numbers, prizes were 

warded, and twice the announcer re- 
quested the Susquehanna freshmen to 

Button, frosh." When, after the first 
request, the freshman response was 
considered inadequate, upper classmen 
required the freshman to button again. 



Susquehanna will celebrate tomorrow 
at the annual Homecoming Day fes- 
tivities. According to H. Vernon Blough, 
alumni secretary, who is in charge of 
arrangements for the events there will 
be a record crowd of alumni, probably 
over 500, back to witness the most ex- 
citing program of events in recent 
years. 

Highlights of the program for the 
week-end are: 

• * * 

Deadline on Decorating — Friday even- 
ing, 6 p. m. Judging will be done be- 
tween 6:30 and 8:30 p. m. 

• * * 

Pep Jamboree — Friday evening, 7 p. m. 
in Alumni Gymnasium. There will be 
grldders of former years present, 
stunts, torch parade, bonfire, refresh- 
ments, and dancing. All free. 

• * * 

Frosh- Soph Football Classic— Saturday 
morning at 9:30 on Crusader Field. 

• * * 

Ail-Star — Alumni Hockey Match — Sat- 
urdnv morning at 10:00 on the W. A. 
A. Field. 

• * • 

Alumni Luncheon— Saturday, 12:15 p. 
m. in Horton Dining Room. 

• * » 

Football Game — Susquehanna vs. Mor- 
avian College. University Field, kick- 
off at 2 p. m. 

• * * 

i 

Phi Mu Delta Dinner— Saturday even- 
ing at 5:45 p. m., dining room of 
Governor Snyder Hotel. 

• « • 

Fraternity Homecoming Dunes — Sat- 
urday evening, 8:00 to 12:00 p. m. 



Many Ex-Footballers to Head List 
of Graduates Returning Saturday 



Vincent Frattali shone. 
1937 

The year the now-Seniors were 
Freshmen, there was a pep rally the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



house. At night the music of Eddie 
Gordon and his orchestra will fill the 
ears and guide the feet of the danc- 
ers. Neil Fisher heads plans for this 
event. 



Susquehanna's alumni will be bark 
in force for Homecoming tomorrow. 
Calvin V. Erdly, president of the alum- 
ni association will, certainly, be on 
hand. So will Reverend William E. 
Swope, of Lebanon, and the Rev. Bur- 
leigh A. Peters, '14, of Altoona. both 
of past gridiron fame. 

Other former grldder.s who'll be on 
the sidelines are the full backlield of 
Susquehanna's previous great unde- 
feated team, Johnny Meyers. Steve 
Martinet', Johnny Banna, and "Skip" 
Rishell. Milt Herman, '99, local hard- 
ware merchant, will be back. So will 
George Moser, '31, a former fullback, 
now I Harrisburg insurance agent, and 
his wife, Beatrice Dew ire. 11, Ray 
Scott, '31, a great quarterback, now 
assistant coach at Pottsville, and Ralph 

j Christopher, '31, of East We«Mn»tOn. 

| a former Crusader guard, will be on 
hand. 

More football players who'll be in the 
grandstands are Johnny Wall, '30, of 
Evanston. Indiana, manager of a bott- 



Ung company, and one of Susque- 
tanna'i big men in the backfield. Bill 

Sullivan. '35, with SwiK Packing Com- 
i.iiiy. located in Belinagrove -another 
member of the undefeated Crueaderi oi 

'32, intends to keep unbroken his rec- 
ord of never mining ■ game. Rev 
William E. Janson. "JO, of York, for- 
mer grid great and coach, will be on 

hand to check up on the team 

Chct Rogowic/,, '24. director of ath- 
letics at Pottsville. isn't going to ml 

the Crusaders- and ball the only cru- 

HUWf athlete to captain three sports 
fOf two seasons 

Ralph Witmer. treasurer ej the sny- 
(iei County Trust Company, Selins- 
I grove, newly married, will be In the 
stands. 

Dr. John I. Woodruff, first football 
coach Susquehanna ever had, will wit- 
ness the game; so will Dr. Fisher, Sus- 
quehanna's second cn"ch. Thev'll be 
stem mentors for the Crusaders of 
1940. 

i Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA, SKUNSGROVK, PA. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940 

THE SUSQUEHANNA "REMINISCENCES" MAY WE . 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- — — — =. . . oUuULal 

mas. Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Thirty cents to pay, for each week. 

intervals, as required o\ the Post Office Department. HKT SATURDAY 

subscript ion $''00 a Year Payable to Maxine Hoeiner. '42, Circulation Manager At the end of each month, settlement Ride Tenderfoot Ride 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. W . « made— This mustang musical follows the 

\ \ — ^TT slx doIlars a month, each one paid. characteristic Autry pattern; the story 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States |A«B*fc **m is weak, the comedy is pitiable and the 

Member of National College Press Association. ■?* V W(1 ha(J meat potatoes, butter and pie, songs are either second hand or corney 

THE STAFF ■ J^J^ " am teUlng the trutn ' tnis ls no Ut ' or both. May we suggest that you just 

U^UUV U TH4TTHPW A -_jL t Sta >' h0IIle and CUrl U l 3 Wlth il B° 0d 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ■••• H ELIZABETH REESE ^'^ f I We had oatmeal, milk, coffee, and book— provided, of course, that you 

BUSINESS MANAGER ■' Dorothy Haffner ^^*^r^ Mtsfex' bread, have not planned to attend the home- 

Associate Ethtoi Forrest Heckert ■ '*" A .sometimes for a change, tried mush coming dance 

nIwTSuo! .■...•.'.':.'.'.'::::.'::.':.'::.'.'.'.'.':.. Ruth schwenk m'P^m^Sm lnstead - — 

Sports Editor".'.: Charles Gundrum DK. CiEOKUE E. FiSitiKK , u MONDAY 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten ..... . _ — 1 never felt better In all my life, Blondie Has Servant Trouble 

Reporters: G.' Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner -41 ; Merle ^ m Qf ..^ ^ c&u A s we joUied together, there was no Psychologists say that the average 

MStfE Kffi&X «"«£ ^Swf ETTAS' Sed T2 ^ - " ^^elySS ^nta^ 

^TT^^^^^K^^^^^^S^^, £L ^ 1V wSa 1 wtaen.l-r — - «- **» passed off the «, picture faffs considerably below 

^Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine pump furnished water . . . where the «JJJ average. 

Fisher '42 ■ Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, really smart co-eds galloped up in Some a have ' et,red on acc0unt 0l 0ld "J " 

■43- Geraldine Jones. '44; Robert Kiefer. '44; Maryruthe Sell. '44; Jane norse and buggy . . . where the Presi- a age - . m , . m And We Have Observed 

Shotts 44 Dorothy wanser, 44. , dent cultivated his own garden? And «■• have faded from «"«norys it has been interesting and not at 

/MvouiaUnn Mnnioor Maxine Heefner page. all discouraging to watch the film in- 

Ohculation Manager pred Wafner Su c h ls the picture that Dr. George dustry , s react f on ^ ^ ean 

Advertising Managers | Chester Shusta E. Fisher, the grand old man of the Homecoming. We undergraduates war 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, 43; Rex Sunday, -43; Dorothy Webber, faculty, can draw of SUBquehanna in wonder ^ lhese Mumni are what ^ the first pl&ce the ^ me&nt a 

•43- Charles Ague. '44; Ralph Brown, '44; Jean Buffington, '44; Susanne 1888. Several ot the recollections he they do ln hfe A glance at the pro . complete loss of the forelgn ma rket. 

Goyne '44- Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; is most likely to chucKle over are. stu- fessional enumeration of Susquehanna since the producers no longer had to 

Lois krammer. '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. dents being ducked in a large wooden Univ e rs it. v Alumni reveals that 35% fear the foreign censors an immediate 

Faculty Advisors: Editorial. Dr. A. H. Wilson; Busines s, Prof. P. I. Reitz . trough, the tempting sport of the ()f our graduates are teachers, 3% be- reaction took place with each film com- 

" FRIDAY. NOVEMBER Tm« S^JSSTEr" Z*cTZ£t came professors, 15'. ministers. Sev- pa ny trying to produce anti-Hitler 

roasung cnicsen over uie com uie in entv _ flve members of past classes are propaganda more quickly than the 

WELCOME HOME GRADS ! a student * s room - in medicine. In the business depart- next. After a few ventures of this 

_ .. , • f o^c^.^honna TTnivpr«itv wp rteriirflte this Not yet founded in tnose da >' s was ment we find that Susquehanna has SO rt, however, the trend turned more 

To the alumni of Susquehanna Univeisity we dedicate tnis Horton Rall .. The Keystone Boardlng graduated students, fifty of whom have a nd more toward the light, sophisti- 

issue Of THE SUSQUEHANNA. If it were possible we Should club," a poem by Reverend J. M. Stov- become bankers and. forty who have cated, and risque comedy. The in- 
like to tiTaSD the hand Of each alumnus as you come onto the er, is reprinted below to illustrate early been licensed accountants. Alumni dustry realized that we get all too 
,vi ,„„„„, „, Q i™™ fr> wmr Almn Mater Susquehanna's food schedule. who are manufacturers and publishers much of the war from our daily papers 

campus and bid you a personal welcome to youi Alma Matei. number eleyen each Susquehanna has and from the radi0 the publi y c p comes 

Father Time has wrought Changes in Susquehanna and III we college boys formed a club the distinction of graduating five men to the movies for entertainment and 

the laces of "the Ol' arads " but the basic traditions Of Home- To secure for us cheaper grub. who later became college presidents, pictures that purport to carry a "mes- 

_ & . mprrvmnk- one congressman, and sixty lawyers. sage " have been noticably poor box- 

coming Day remain unchanged. It ls still a time 101 menymaK Qur dollars were few (0 mb logelner Tnis labulatlon to by no mea ns com- office of late. 

ing and entertainment, a time for the revival Of old friendships sometimes my purse was light as a plete and only serves the purpose of The pictures have not yet been guilty 
inri old memories a time for the Susquehanna Of yesterday to feather. giving undergraduate students a rough Q f too much of the cheap commercial 
unu uiu iik.hu , n «stuHpnt« estimate of the life's work Susque- " K ate Smith" brand of super-patriot- 
meet the Susquehanna Of today. Yes, a time wnen biuucntb We ,. ecui . ed a cook ou a cer taln street, hanna Alumni now enjoy. ism , nor have they gone to the ex- 

have no classes and grads have no office hours. What better , tremes that the British have in their 

reason could anyone h ave for being ha ppy! |f AESOP SPEAKS^ ^ ^ ^^1 ^^ " arCn ' 1 
THE SATURDAY LETTER ^ S — 

Dear Friend: Odm upon a Time tiiere was Wood- reached the Professor's desk long be- v/ V X^I\. 1 fl.lL • • 

Once each year, the theme is Student drinking and each I0W ■. Woodie " as u i, s Roonmiate had fore anyone Else. He coyly presented ATT? \\J A\7TTQ 

vear manv valuable hours are exhausted in an attempt to for- fondly nicknamed htm was an Apple- The Apple, saying: • • r\lrv WflV Lu 

* , * . 4. u „ + „, ni Kq QfTo^.tivo Thn«P nf ns who Polisher. That literally. He gleamed the "Doctah, an apple for You!" 

mulate an argument that will be effective. The* !Of US WW) ^^ ^ ^ ^ indulge ^ ^ ..^ me? „ jj- ^^JJJ J^ work J be 

Watch Students come and go know that excessive Student OlinK- Intra . Mural Sport give to Favorite "Ah!" dramatized over the Columbia Broad- 

inti is bad business for everyone concerned, but it is difficult for Professor*. He had quite a business. Now, the Professor was Ravenous cast i ng System this Sunday afternoon 

*u u i~~™ f.-» m AYMrUnm tn pnnvinrp those who think ll waH the Season for Mid-Semester for he hadn't eaten for At Least three will be Pascal's "Pensees." This is one 

those, Who know liom expeiience, to convince tnose wno HUM .^^ Woodie WftS doing a Land-Office hours and anyway test-giving always of the series of dramatizations being 

they have all the right answers. Business, as might be supposed. made him Hungry. He ground into The done under Columbia's "Invitation to 

In the first place, drinking is expensive. Most drinkers Woodie had received a Note from a Apple with a vengeance. (And his Learning" series. The program is giv- 

, • i ,,™.„ tv,o« thmr' aVi/mH rirink and also more than theV Beat Eta pl bov - Xt read: teeth ' of course) en over CBS Sunday afternoon from 

dllllk more than they should dlinK ana aiSO moie WUUi mvy ^^ Woocii e, He leaned back and Munched Away, 4:30 to 5:00 p. m 

Wish to drink. It requires money that is needed lor food, bOOkS, Send me a four.inch smokehouse murmuring Something Unintelligible. Blaise Pascal was a devoted reader 

and ordinary living expenses. Most students can't afford the with a Hyper-Glimmer right away. And then he saw the Worm! of Montaigne, with whose skepticism 

J 'Advanced Greek" coming up. Special He spluttered. And fussed. And he ls sometimes credited by those who 

luxury. m.w.«- bonus if nere in ten mlnutes - fumed. do not feel the force of his religious 

In the second place, drinking causes students to do tilings Yours .. You flunk!" he hurled at zeke, as nature In his -pensees," or 

thev WOUld not otherwise do Probably ninety per cent Of all Zeke Z,eke hurled through the doorway. "Thoughts." a miscellany of his opin- 

• ,. „,^,,i^ nmiD1 . Hove rWHnnrri PYPPiit for drink- Tllt ' bon,,s ^ )arl sounded Attractive. Woodie, shortly Thereafter, as soon ions upon rea son and revelation, the 

discipline cases would nevei have developed except 101 annK ^ .^ ^ ^ & ^ Qd customer as he could see well enough took up ^ JJJ of ^ man are JJJ^ ^ be 

ing. This argument alone should appeal to anyone With an Woodie selected a Beautiful Specimen the Gentle Art of Knitting for the seen No more interesting struggle 

average intelligence rating University men, above all Others, and gave it The Works. Boys Over There. with d 0ubt has ever been witnessed in 

,^ u • * i a i„ fvfoi,. ™.m »/olfarP The A PP le reacned Zeke J ust as ne Moral: 'Snuff said. the modern world. For this seven- 

Should be interested in then own wellaie v , as leaving fQr The Tfits -Joe Aesop. teenth-centurv Frenchman was an 

In th third place, drinking is always done on false leason- Zeke das hed off with the prize and S acute mathematician and natural phil- 

ing and all college men should be sensitive to good thinking. _ — — — . ._ ag~ osopher at the same time that he was 

Take, for example, the man who drinks to -loose,, up." He does _ j^r^wo ETIS^ "SSST K! 

loosen up and exposes his weaknesses to the public. Altei IVlX^lVzTk.I V/V VJXlZ^l^ 1 IL 11 l^lVlwJ reV eiation by instinct, he has also the 

spending years of time in an effort to overcome his weaknesses _ compulsion to go on using his mind. 

so that he may make a better impression socially or in business , nu . KU:kapoo Git ,, eUe s ace reporter parked behind the gymnasium on M- onf^hich "SSl no\ C Tea e ve it h i i m a afo t n > e d 

he then throws everything overboard when he gets drunk. Or .Kid Kickapoo. is on campus mooping day of last week? he feels als0 the necesslty of taki ng it 

nnnairfpr thP one who drinks to f-ain courage Or Strength. He I** ^ v°» lor K° ss1 P left carelessly Have you a desire to tell of your ex- ^ 

COIlSldei the one V*no UlinKS to ^aiu Luuia b c ui o & )vin ^ &boM penences and social reactions as a stn mule between faith and rea- 

makes himself a butt for jokes and a victim oi ridicule. ^ Moi , lvla n scouts were so thick baby? By ail means then sign up for J^Zj^t^J^^SmSy 

If drinking happened to be a new trick, there might be at the Allegheny-Susquehanna grid- sociology under the new dean of worn- b whose ls one of the ; 

i- • ,t. ti«« o«H roeoo „.h- hut evprv ppn- iron clas ' sic tnat Coach Sta S8 sent a en - Jack Walsn wiU give advice 0n n«l| olo.ies of Prenrl. literature 

some excuse tor experimentation and leseaich, but eveiy gen ^^ .^ ^ stands to "^ ^ ^ to pm$m any problem to the manen glomes of Pjenc" ute rature. 
eration has tried it and every generation has obtained the same opiuion on a spries of plays . You can class . *£ the W«*»g wto in th, 

answers **** me M sayine that ll w u in lake My "J ke l °, a11 fre ; h ™" is not to drop suddenly into prose or levity, or 

t«„„i« n nn rf dnnnpH nnp ilav more than pencil teamwork to beat the carry the practice of dating upper- 'J' ~~ , i n «t»ntiv from thp 

During the summer, we were touring and stopped one day ^^ £J gaturday SSLrt girl friends too tar. Just a * h o ° ^ Jf «Jg a feMtlot eio- 

at a road-side restaurant in a mountainous country, wnen we Had said ^^ soughl advice from nint to the freshman romeos. * nce The .. Pensees .. ha ve been quot- 

weie eating lunch, a party Of lour came in, three Of whom were ■ certain Susquehanna co-ed (noted Latest fashion plate-mustaches for • purpose, and it is true that 

young men o. eone^eUe AH had Pee,, drinking and continued £ <£, J- *m*g~ - - JMJH-J; ***** — «• j. -jn jg J-Mf-g ,«-£ 
to drink while we finished lunch. At two o'clock, the party left ed To tnose who prefer week-end ex- JJJJJJ baming ■ ine range 

the restaurant and with much hilaritv entered a car. At three Here It the weekly brain teaser. Kind cursions, I suggest they give their sup- „ 

uu naiauiout mm and due consideration will be given all port to the alumni in backing a real irom the house with false teeth usurped 

O'clock the three young men Of college age welt Cltaa. one, wno umm in Meeting a winner- lootball team this Saturday. from a completely astounded aunt, a 

had considered drink ii smart trick, had driven the car over a problem: Why was the Essex, listed Kickapoo corn cob f rom an uncle, a pumpkin 

Rtfltn nreeinice This Whole experience has haunted me for under the ownership of Mr Kelly, 8 from one cousin, and an autographed 

atctrjj pn.v.ipiv.i. i . ««..»«■ _ . fresh egg from another cousin A 

weeks. It is one that should be a lesson fOT all but. Oi COUlse, TJ] ± D/ l/c Vtllh/IYrri CMfi Aft/ photographer should have been around 

it won't be. Even some of those who read these lines will do so 1 lllUI ll J L I lis L^nlUUI f U33/r(t III lo wltne ss the startled looks of the 

with d Iftiiirh un the sh-eve for what they consider, Sunday -^ 1 O r^ \ O / clerk as three fair maidens dashed in 

V>lth a laugn up tnt Slttvt ioi, vviiul _ ' KpllUIVriK \ ( A SpHYChPYS »» Van Bibber cigars. .. .And so it 

school preaching and go on with their particular drinking 1\L ILUI 11$ O. ^>. JT\. JtWHA^r/J JJ^ 

StUntS until thev too have some terrible experience. Then they '-....And be back by nine.'' With this Bank for an inscription which she now Back in the social room again the 
u-ill whin,. "Whv did vou let me dO It?" or "1 wasn't myself rlnglni OOamUd was launched the S. knows Isn't there. Along comes some first prize of lollypops went to the con- 
Will Whine, Why ttltt \OU Ul me uo it. w *w« u y ^ ^ scavenger Hunt Saturday even- Interested town lady, taps her on the le stants headed by Nancy Grlesemer. 
when it happened," or T didn't mean anything Dy It. , nf , wl(h jH( . k Walsh , a the ne i m A f ter a rm, and asks curiously as she, too, Tr je rest of the evening was given over 
Any excessive drinking is bad business, but excessive stU- muc h "ohlng and "airing as the con- gazes up at the roof, "Is there any- to dancing, with the group being 

i « iJLuw.,. L , ,, ,.i.,ih, h.H hM*auaa cnlleee men are SUP- tents of the lists were digested, the in- thing wrong up there?" After a slightly augmented by dance, but not 
dent drinking is especially bad buaust college men a i ; sup ^^ ^^ ^ ^ j^ w&y ^^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ scavenger hunt lovers It was at thls 

posed tO have a little more 01 the gray nialeiial at tne nmw n (ach con!Uient t hat they knew exactly to get another inscription By the time that Katie Hansen took the lime- 

their Spines and also to have Stronger spines. where Mdl article was to be found, time the last group got to the National, light as the head of the food commit- 

Vei'V tl'UlV Lets take a yna P sno1 view of some of Mr. Mease had recovered from his sur- tee; a round of applause goes to her for 

nA. f LvnP lv/rAKTr-utraTTTP tne scavengers as they are "scaveng- prise and was automatically handing the sumptuous feast of sandwiches 

HAYMOINU H. MAINL-l-illi&lUK lng „ the tQwn out autographed men us Relatives doughnuts, and cider which she offered 

Office Dean Of Men Here's Pern Lauver looking intently played an Important role ln one group's to the hungry group. Thus endeth an- 

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio at the roof of the Parmer's National activity as they successfully emerged other successful S. C. A. party. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE. PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-<»- 



<$> 



-<& 







#V5> * 






Crusaders Strangle 
'Gator Eleven, 27-12 



A Hound For Gains 



<&// /// i i/f* flwx 



The Susquehanna University eleven has run the gauntlet cf six games so far 
this season and remains unscathed. The climax of the season's activity 
will be the Staggmen's tilt with the undefeated Moravian Greyhounds here 
tomorroww. Fond memories of the undefeated Crusader team of '32 mingle 
with high hopes for a clean slate in 1940. 



UNDEFEATED CRUSADERS CONFIDENT OF 
VICTORY IN CLIMAXGAME TOMORROW 

Every Man on Squad Re^.dy to Do Battle With 
Moravian "Greyhounds;" New System Inaug- 
urated; Starting Line-up Announced 



Substitutes Show Promise In Alle- 
gheny Contest; Zeravica, Helm, and 
Isaacs Score; Marcuso Stands Out 



There comes a time in the history 
every college football team, when they \ 
would like, more than anything else, ' 
to defeat one certain opponent on their j 
schedule. Such will be the case in the I 
Homecoming Day tilt this Saturday as j 
the Crusaders from Susquehanna take 
on the Greyhounds from Moravian in | 
what promises to be our hardest game j 
of the year. 

The series started in 1932 when Sus- j 
quehanna took the measure of the boys i 
from Bethlehem, 17-7. Since then, the I 
best that the Orange and Maroon has | 
been able to show was a 0-0 tie in 1933, 
losing the remaining six games. The 
game this year holds forth further in- 
terest in the fact that both squads are I 
members of a half dozen undefeated 
teams in the state, and both will be i 
striving to keep their slate clean. 

This year's Moravian outfit really j 
seems to have what it takes as shown I 
by their long string of victories. A j 
solid line plus a smooth-running back- | 
field and good reserves are the main 
reasons for the success of the Grey- 
hound juggernaut. The main cog in 
the engine has been a lad from Free- 
mansburg, Pa., by the name of Jimmy 
Fritchman, who plays left halfback. 
Six feet two, 195 pounds of stored dyna- 
mite, Jimmy plays a whale of a game 
on both the offense and the defense. 
Sydorak does a fine job of full -backing 
while Blasco and Burkhardt have 
shown up exceptionally well on the 
line this year. 

Susquehanna's biggest weakness is 
in the reserve column. Coach Stagg 
has been hampered all season by the 
lack of material, sometimes experienc- 
ing difficulty in having inter-squad 
scrimmaging. However, the boys have 
all shown that they are playing to win 
and this spirit has brought them along 
that hard victory trail. The line, from 
end to end, presents as sturdy an ap- 
pearance as you could find. The tri- 
umvirate of captains, Joe Greco, 
Johnny Matthews, and Sam Fletcher, 
has played magnificent ball all sea- 

m as have Joe Campana, Dick Mat- 
thews, Phil Templin, and Blair Heat- 
on. The backfleld, built around Steve 
Zeravica, triple-threat fullback, is 
composed of Larry Isaacs, the diminu- 
tive 142-pound bundle of slippery ball 
carrier, line-smashing Johnny Zuback, 
and smooth-running Jack Helm. These 
boys, plus Ken Lyons and Joe Wos, 
two able backfleld substitutes, should 
give the Greyhounds plenty of trouble 
all afternoon. 

Probable lineup: 
Moravian Susquehanna 

19McConlogue . L. E Greco 70 

39 Rowe L. T. . R. Matthews B0 

14 Burkhardt .. L. G. ... Campana 76 

25 Grlgg C Templin 84 

31DeSimone ... R. G. . J. Matthews 74 

17Lobb R. T Fletcher 5 

18 Blasco R. E Heaton 80 

21 Rosati Q. B Zuback 77 

30 Fritchman . . L. H Isaacs 4 

HCompardo ... R. H Helm 8 

22 Sydorak .... F. B Zeravka 2 

Referee: A. E. Armitage (Gettys- 
burg); umpire: R. C. Kichline (Ur- 
anus); linesman: R. Y. Grube (Leb- 
anon Valley). 



of i W^itch Him Tomorrow 





For the sixth straight week the Sus- 
quehanna University team is unde- 
feated. Last Saturday the locals 
journeyed across the state to Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, where they acquired a 
,7-12 victory at the expense of the 
Ulegheny College gridsters. 

The Susquehanna eleven broke into 
.he scoring column early in the second 
quarter when a pass from Helm to 
jjaaca and a series of first downs from 
running plays with Helm and Zeravica 
lugging the ball, culminated as Zera- 
vica raced eight yards from a spinner 
formation to tally. Heaton kicked the 
jxtra point. The remainder of the first 
aalf saw the Crusaders again on the 
march but an interception of a long 
forward pass foiled the chance. 

It took only a few minutes for the 
locals to score after the third period 
jegan. Passes and running plays ad- 
vanced the ball into enemy territory 
and Jack Helm took the ball over on a 
„en yard run to score standing. Heat- 
jn again split the uprights as tht 
jtaggmen led 14-0. 

On the next kickoff, Allegheny ran 
die ball behind good blocking to mid- 
field where Fletcher pulled Marusco 
down from the rear. On two passes and 
an end run, the inspired home team 
scored its initial touchdown of the cur- 
rent season as Captain Marusco scored. 
The attempted placement was wide. 

The Crusaders then gathered re- 
vengeful momentum and on two long 
down -field drives Isaacs and Zeravica 
tallied. Heaton converted for the third 
time but failed in his fourth kick. 

At this point the reserves took the 
Held for the locals and started an ad- 
vance against a fatigued Allegheny 
team. However, an interception stopped 
the thrust in mldfield. On the final 
play of the contest, Marusco heaved a 
long forward pass to the Susquehanna 
one yard line. The ball bounded from 
the arms of several Crusaders and was 
finally gathered in by Ruel of the Alli- 
gator eleven. The attempted point 
failed. 

8 




-JF 



l/Z/WMY Fl/rCt/M/iH - 0AC. 

This 190-pound halfback, playing his 
fourth season of varsity football at 
Moravian, is easily the greatest back 
Moravian has produced. In six games 
he has averaged nine yards per try 
in rushing and has registered sixty- 
two points to rank among top east- 
ern collegiate scoring leaders. 



Alumnae and Varsity 
Vie for Hockey Win 



Eleanor Saveri and Mary Appier to 
Head Challenging Team; Many For- 
mer Stars to Return for Combat 



S. U. Girls Play Host 
On Hockey Play Day 



LARRY ISAACS 
This 140 pound Crusader ball carrier is 
in the harness again after recovering 
from an injury suff?red several weeks 
ago. His classy running may put 
Susquehanna on the big end of to- 
morrow's score. 



Frosh May Overturn 
Sophomore Gridsters 



The eve of the 1940 freshinan-sopho- 
more grid battle finds all indications 
pointing to one of those always thrill- 
ing "anything can happen" affairs. 
This traditional Homecoming Day at- 
traction will go on promptly at 9:30 
Vclock tomorrow morning, and prom- 
ises plenty of fireworks. 

On the other hand, we find .sopho- 
more Coach Gus Kuufnmn is just a 
ittle inclined to believe otherwise. His 
inal pre-game comment was as fol- 
lows: "I expect the sophomores to re- 
peat their victory of last year. How- 
ever, the boys are not over-confident 
as they realize the ttlfl competition 
that awaits them from the highly seu- 
soned former high school stars that 
dot the Irishman squad this year." 

Standouts on the Kltlfmtn machine 
ue many. Don Stiber, triple-threat 
backfleld ace, is expected to cause the 
frossh no end of worry. He kicks, passes. 
and runs like a veteran. Sid Kember- 
ling, 185 pound fullback, will be the 
one selected to crash that line when 
it is a case of only two or three yards 
to go for l first down, while Martin 
Musselinun will be one of tin- main 
cogs clearing the path for him. Bill 
Curry, fleet end, is expected to get 
plenty Ol action on the receiving end 
Of passe.s. 

Stuard Flicklnger has shown consid- 
erable promise and ll expected to carry 
the brunt of the frosh running at- 
tack. Bill Janson and Marlin Bollinger 
two big tackles, are the mainstays of 



Cedar Crest Places First in Meet; 
Gaines, Luncheon, Talk, Music Are 
Features of Successful Day 

Last Saturday Susquehanna's W. A.: 
A. was host to the annual hockey play 
day held by Cedar Crest, Lebanon Val- 
ley. Shippensburg, and Susquehanna. 

At 10:45 Lebanon Valley opened the' 
meet by playing S. U. Susquehanna 
MB 2-0; Hutch made both goals. At 
11:30 Cedar Crest beat Shippensburg 
1-0. 

A tasty lunch was served in the col- 
lege dining hall on "hockey fields" with 
eight goal posts. Jeanne Fenner in the 
absence of "Crompie" was mistress of 
ceremonies. Miss Shure extended greet- 
ings and Jeanne introduced the other 
coaches and the two officials, Miss 
Stevenson and Miss Yanish. 

Mrs. Gait (the mother of our goalie) 
gave an interesting talk on sports in 
Egypt. 

Games were resumed at 2:30 before 
! which pictures of each team were 
; taken. L. V. lost to Shippensburg 2-0, 
, and S. U. lost to Cedar Crest 3-0. Cedar 
j Crest placed first in the meet and 
| Susquehanna second. 

Susquehanna's lineup included: Ben- 
MgV, Hutchison, West, Bauman, Crow, 
Mt Williams, Fenner Welch, Brand, Da- 
vis, Schwenk, Krumbholz. Grothe, 
Reitz, Hoover, and Gait. 

A buffet rapper was served in the 
parlors following the games. Shortly 
, afterward the visiting girls were on 
i their way home. 

the fast charging line, while Phil 
Plummer looks like a standout at the 
end position. 

The probable starting lineups for 
the two teams are us follows: 
Freshman Sophomore 

Adonlzio L. E Klinger 

Clark L. T. ... MacCartney 

Shafer, D L. G Eastep 

Schaeffer, J C Wolfe 

Bollinger R. G Emiet 

Janson R. T Mussehnan 

Plummer R. E Curry 

Schueler Q. B Milford 

Brown L. H Stiber 

Lohman R. H Walsh 

Fliokinger F. B Kemberling 



The Alumnae and varsity hockey 
teams will meet in what promises to 
be a classic on Homecoming Day. The 
Alumnae team is being managed by 
Eleanor Saveri, '39, of East Bangor. 
and Mary Appier, '39, of Hughesville. 
They report that they are out to win 
from the All-Stars to keep pace with 
the alumni. 

On the other hand, the All-Stars are 
just as certain that they will emerge 
the victors after Saturday's game. The 
alumnae returning to play in the game 
are: Marie Edlund, Grace Fries, Helen 
Wright. Charlotte Baish. Mary Appier, 
Eleanor Saveri, Eleanor Croft, Mar- 
jorie Curtis, Shirley Finkbeiner, Ma- 
thilda Neudoerffer, Louise West, Helen 
Hisdorf, Eleanor Brown. Esther A. 
Yingling, Ruth Jones, Mildred Peifer, 
Elizabeth Fry, Martha A. Bolig, Mar- 
garet Corson, and Mary Beth Rich- 
ards. 

The All-Stars will be composed of 
the following: center forward, Hutch- 
ison; right half, Davis, Grothe, Schwe- 
itzer, and Wanser; right full, Poor- 
baugh; left full, Reitz; left half, Cox; 
center half, Krumbholz; left inner, 
Crompton and Heefner; right inner, 
Crawford and Bennagc; and goalkeep- 
er. Gait. 

Pep Rally Features 
Bon Fire and Dance 



Cheers, the bonfire behind the gym, 
dancing, and informal talks by alumni 
members of fenner football teams and 
by members of our present team will 
comprise the program for ths pep rally 
to he held tonight in the gym, at 7.15. 

The dancing, which will follow the 
bonfire, is sponsored by the Women's 
Student Council and the Men's Stu- 
dent Council. An informal program will 
include: Trio Son g s t e rs — Holmes, 
Welch, and McWUliams; Piano Swing 
by Eetty Malone; and mastery of cere- 
monies by Clyde Sechler. 

Let us give our undefeated tsam Qm 
support they need to meet our toughest 
opposition of the season by all attend- 
in; the rally. Come and ring bells; 
bring your nolteinakers. The bund will 
M there to help you. 



Jim Gallagher to Report 
Grid Game Here Tomorrow 



The Philadelphia Record has < 
that it is sending Jim Gallagher, fa- 
mous .<■ ports reporter, to cover the 8ui- 
quehanua-Moravian game here tomoi - 
row. Edcle Baker will cover the game 
for the Philadelphia Inquirer. The tart 
that these Philadelphia newspapers 
have assigned these reporter! here re- 
flects the Importance placed upon the 
name by sports authorities over the 
j state; two of Pennsylvania's four un- 
t defeated teams are promising a eru- 
j cial game. 

_ 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



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Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
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411 Market St.. Sunbirry, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
The $p*cdl Store 

RepMewd Drue Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



325 Market St - 
SUNBURY — 



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Personally Selected 

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Sunbury, Pa. 



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Walnut Street, Sellnsgrove. Pa. 



B. K. W. lO ACT! LINE 

Tries to clve the Colle-e Students 
the he*t service, especially the Sun- 
hury Students Whv TRAVEL with 
«n individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



-Patronize Susquehanna advertiser^ 



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Paxton Crick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 

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THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1940 



Phi Mu Whips B&K 12-6 
As Tournament Climax 

Braving the elements Of rain and 
darkness, Phi Mu Delta's touch team 
came through with a 12-6 victory over 
Bond and Key In the late afternoon of 
Friday, November 1. This victory 
places Phi Mu in a tie with Freshmen 
in the inter-mural race. 

The players for Phi Mu Delta were 
Gus Kaufman, Joe Zavarich, John 
Jones, Fred Warner, Chet Shusta. Jack 
Walsh, Jim Milford, and Bill Curry. 
Bond and Key's line-up consisted of 
Melvtn Jones. Red Mitman, George 
Herman. Clyde Sechler, Alan Parcells, 
and Gerald Startzel. 

S 

LAWRENCE C'ADY PRESENTS 
REVIEW IN PHI KAPPPA 

(Continued f v om Pace 1) 
characteristics of this well known book 
and emphasized that every college stu- 
dent should read it. Mr. Durant de- 
picts in a clear manner the cultural, 
economic, and political life of ancient 
Athens. He demonstrates how many of 
our modern customs have drifted down 
through the centuries from their Greek 
iitrces and have become a vital part 
i our life today. 

Dr. Ahl hau2 several interesting 
comments regarding this work and 
concluded his remarks with the ex- 
tending of an Invitation to the club 
to come to his home for the next meet- 
ing. 



-S- 



MANV EX-FOOTB.»LLERS TO 
RETURN SATURDAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Ted Moller, a member of the Uni- 
versity Board of Directors, and man- 
ager of the Moller Organ Company, 
will be here for the game. Bill Deck- 
er, '21, of Montgomery, will show up 
for it, too. 

From northern Jersey will travel Bill 
Weliky. 11, lawyer from Newark; Dick 
Scharfe, '31, business executive from 
the same town. Betty Albury, '40, al- 
ready a school teacher, will journey 
from Cranford. Bill Carolan and 
Johnny Ballentine. both class of '32, 
will vacation from the New Jersey 
Power and Light especially to visit the 
campus. 

Fritz Goyne, '38, Al Eyer. "36, and Bill 
Ahl, '33, will travel up from Phila- 
delphia to show their wives where they 
went to school. 

There'll be a lot more. 



After the assembly in memory of 
hose who died across the ocean, and 
after luncheon. Susquehanna's football 
earn disheartened Juniata. 13-0. Par- 
icipators were Joe Greco, Sam Fletch- 
er, John Zuback, Bill Pritchard, Tom 
Lewis, Lou Baylor, Paul Groce, Bill 
Javis, Steve Zeravica, Vincent Frat- 
talli, Dick Matthews, Ed Eisenhart, 
.Tank Morgan, Stan Blough, Clair Kal- 
reider, and Larry Isaacs. 

Homecoming— the pattern is clear. 

S 

3USQUEHANNA ENJOYS 
FAMOUS GRID HISTORY 

(Continued from Page 1) 
student body. Dr. John I. Woodruff, 
u>w professor emeritus of Philosophy, 
soached this first eleven. 

Almost two decades ago Susquehanna 
University abolished every trace of an 
athletic .scholarship on the campus. In 
1932 it produced its first and only un- 
lefeated team to date with none of 
its players being labeled with a price 
tag. Susquehanna has football for all 
on an amateur basis. 

Many of the older "grads" will recall 
that annually Susquehanna sent her 
teams to do battle with Cornell on the 
shorn of Lake Cayuga and other ma- 
jor teams such as Colgate, Army, Ford- 
ham, Temple, and Georgetown. Just 
as often the team returned to Selins- 
grove on the short end of a big score; 
several times the team managed to sal- 
vage a victory from the big boys, but 
I they were scarce. Now the Crusaders 
are scheduling teams in their own 
class and usually try to get opponents 
with similar intercollegiate athletic 

strand 

I it r x I U l 
sunbury 



ideals— "playing the game for sport." 

Dr. John I. Woodruff, present pro- 
fessor emeritus of philosophy, was the 
coach of the first football team. In 
1892 the players bought their own 
equipment and played on any lot in 
Selinsgrove which happened to be va- 
cant at the moment. Later enough 
land was acquired to construct a small 
athletic field known as Warner Field. 
It contained a football gridiron which 
was also used as a baseball diamond, 
and a small running track. 

In 1921 began a football expansion 
program which is still continuing. 
Enough land adjacent to Warner Field 
was purchased to make more football 
gridirons, and Warner Field was 
gradually absorbed by the bigger and 
more modern University Field. 

The abolition of athletic scholarships 
and subsidies resulted in a highly hon- 
orable Susquehanna football. How- 
ever, this change of policy was not 
wrought in a moment. It required a 
period of years, necessitating a grad- 
ual change of attitude on the part of 
students, alumni, and administration. 
The scheduling of grid games with 



BINGAMAN'S SS 

Sandwiches— Hot Beef, Ham, Egff, 

Weiner, Cheese, Hamburger 

Vegetable Soup, Baked Beans, 

Ice Cream 

1 W. PINE ST. SELINSGROVE 



-S- 



WRTTELEY'S 

BUSES FOR HIRE 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

Dorothy Lamour 
Robert Preston 



in 



(4 



PATTERN OF PRECEDENTS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
night before, the annual female hockey 
match next morning, an alumni dinner 
with speeches at noon, and Susque- 
hanna played Washington again. 

The game was a repeat of the pre- 
vious Homecoming at which S. U. met 
Washington. Bill Pritchard and Sam 
Fletcher struggled against overwhelm- 
ing odds; losing 26-0. Bob Pritchard 
i now assistant coach at a prominent 
Lutheran college) served in the coach- 
ing ranks. 

And, as the year before, there were 
fraternity dances in the evening. 
1938 

The year the Juniors were S. U. new- 
comers, a special pep meeting was held 
Friday evening. "Several former grid 
stars will speak." The rest of the even- 
ing the students attended a Hallowe'en 
masquerade partv t?lven by the Student 
Christian Association. 

In the morning, the Sophs won their 
football gsime with tiie Frosh, 13-0. 
Lunch had an innovation for Home- 
coming-no speeches. 

The afternoon was a slight depart- 
ure from the preceden ts set at pre- 
vious Homecomings. Despite a game in 
Which Joe Oreco, Tom Lewis, J. Mat- 
thews. Phil Templin, Dick Matthew.-. 
Bern Fletcher, Blair Beaton, Clair Kal- 
ti eider, and Bill Davis played, Mora- 
vian pranced home. 13-7. 

Various classes held reunions utter 
the gsat; the fraternities, dances in 

the evening. 
1939 

Last year's Homecoming was a 
double teal in I November 11, 1939, was 
also the twenty-first snniversary of the 
now-negativated Work) war Armistice 
"A Susquehanna at peace welcome 
Susquehanna oi the war." 

President smith declared Saturday 
an official holiday, no classes in the 
morning the Soph i itfootbaUtd the) 
Frosh, and the Alumnae met the girls' 
hockej nam. 

B, o war veterans marched from the 

local Legion home to tie' war inaii I t 

on i ampui 'am i< tapi wai blown, • 
salute wsj Bred and remarks were 
made In mentor) ol thow whe weren't 
able to H turn [rem Ranee to tin 

1I< Hamming. 



Moon Over 
Burma" 

SUNDAY MIDNIGHT 

Jchnny Downs 
Barbara Allen 



"Melody and 
Moonlight" 

MONDAY and TUESDAY 

Wayne Morris 
Lillian Cornell 

in 

"Quarterback" 



ROYAL Portable TYPEWRITERS 
STATIONERY SUPPLIES 

JOS. S. MENTZ 

266 Market Square 
Sunbury, IV una. 



See 

MADEMOISELLE 



Si 



'tyles 

Come to Life at 

LIEB'S 

"For Things That Are Different" 
SUNRURY, PENNA. 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 



SELINSGROVE 



SATURDAY 



"Ride Tenderfoot 
Ride" 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Relchley's 
SHOE RHINE 



twlli 



Gene Autry 

Smiley Burnette 

June Storey 



MONDAY 



"Blondie Has 
Servant Trouble" 



Compliments of 

Herman & Wetzel 

N. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 



with 



Penny Singleton 
Arthur Lake 
L?»rry Simms 



Compliments of 

Keller's Quality 
Market 

BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



powerful elevens representing the larg- 
est colleges in order to secure a large 
financial guarantee was discontinued. 

Among the 500 returning "grads" of 
Susquehanna University will be many 
of whom had some difficulty in chas- 
ing the great Jim Thorpe when Sus- 
quehanna teams battled the Carlisle 
Indians and also many of the members 
of that great undefeated eleven in 1932 
which was turned out by Bill Ullery, 
now baseball coach at Lebanon Valley, 
and Herb Snell, distinguished high 
school mentor at Coraopolis. 

Shortly, the more modern Crusaders 
under "Lonnie" Stagg. the elder son of 



the "grand old man of football." will 
go down in the annals of Susquehanna 
University grid history as one of the 
greatest, if not greatest eleven. 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS AND 

SHOES 

CURLEE SUITS 

South Market St. Selinsgrove 




When vim think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

SIS Market Street. Sunbury. Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



The pause that refreshes 

Sunbury Coca Cola 
Bottling Works 

SUNBURY 
B. P. O. Edwards, Manager 



MOYER'S SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

(HILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



PENN STATE PHOTO SHOP 

STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



George B. Rine FLORIST JKS? S£ 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

29 N. Market St. Selinsgrove, Pa. 




SNYDER COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 

Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



First National Bank of Selins Grove 

Welcomes Students* Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



THE LUTHERAN 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological In- 
stitution. Now in its 114 year. 

For Information address: 

JOHN ABERLY, President 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

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MEN'S ANT> BOYS' 
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Sunbury, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selliurrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 

courses:— 

LIBERAL ART8 and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

POUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAININO 

' RE-MEDICAL. PRE-DENTAL. PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B., B.8.. and Mus. B. degrees 

O. Morris 8mith. A.M., DD., Pre* 
Russell Gait, Ph.D.. Dean 



200 N. Broad St. 



Highlights 
Of the Week 

Skating Party Tonite 

The Business Society will sponsor a 
roller-skating party to Island Park to- 
night. The group will leave Seibert at 
6:45. The cost is fifteen cents for 
members and forty cents for non- 
members. 
Campus Club Meeting 

The Campus Club will meet in Sei- 
bert Parlors Wednesday afternoon from 
3 to 5 p. m. 
Lanthorn Photos Here 

Nancy Griesemer has announced 
that those who have ordered photos 
from the Penn State Photo Shop can 
obtain them by calling at Seibert Social 
Kooms Wednesday afternoon after 2 
p. m. It will be necessary to pay for 
the pictures before they may be lifted. 
K. D. P. Thanksgiving Party 

Kappa Delta Phi Sorority will en- 
tertain the other sororities at a 
Thanksgiving Party Thursday evening 
from 8 to 10:30 p. m. in the Social 
Rooms. 
Fraternity Rushing Begins 

The fraternity rushing season will 
begin Friday, November 22, instead of 
on November 26 as previously an- 
nounced. 
Inter-Sorority Dance 

The annual Inter-sorority Fall Dance 
will be held in Alumni Gymnasium 
Saturday night from 8 to 12 p. m. Mu- 
sic will be provided by Bruce Hall. 
Faculty Recital Monday 

Members of the faculty of the Con- 
servatory of Music will present a re- 
cital in Seibert Hall Auditorium Mon- 
day evening at 8:15 p. m. 
Vacation Begins 

Thanksgiving vacation will begin 
Wednesday, November 27, at noon and 
will extend to noon on Monday, De- 
cember 2. 
Next Issue December 10 

The next issue of THE SUSQUE- 
HANNA will appear on December 10 
because of the Thanksgiving vacation. 
S 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940 



Number 14 



Phi Mu Delta Passes 
Quarter Century 



This year of 1940 marks a quarter of 
a century in the history of Mu Alpha 
Chapter of Phi Mu Delta. It began 
way back in the year 1915 when eight 
students met in Selinsgrove Hall and 
founded the basis of the fraternity. 
This group, known as Alpha Sigma 
Omega continued in existence until 
1925 when it saw the advantages of 
belonging to a national fraternity and 
merged with the Phi Mu Delta. 

A dinner was held at the Hotel Gov- 
ernor Snyder for all the old grads and 
the present active members of the 
fraternity at 5:45. The dinner was 
topped off with a fine speech by Rev. 
Janson of York, Pa., who stressed the 
spirit and athletics in a fraternity in 
connection to the school. 

Rev. Janson compared the spirit in 
the old days under A. S. O. and stress- 
ed the fact that loyalty to Susque- 
hanna University comes first in the 
affection of the student body. 

Robert Hostetter, executive secretary 
of the Pittsburgh Building Owners' 
Association, served as toastmaster and 
paid tribute to Dr. Peter Klingler, one 
of the fraternity's honoraries who 
passed away on Saturday. 

The celebrations were climaxed by a 
dance at the house with Art Wendell's 
orchestra, from Hazleton, doing the 
honors. 

-S- 



Ref lections of Our 
Festive Homecoming 



To the Crusader Team, Undefeated — 'and Without Subsidy or Academic Boosting? 



.-TVA'A^.y^. - 



»Ttf» 20 12 14/ 15»LE 




Sfisw ■<-■■*; >\v. ««W ww«t *3Wft«( 

^.v^Sy .£«*£, %&#■ **- w ..-av* rtK-c-j «1 



&m ss«» mm . - A ft m .-i 



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7S 92 






Grads Revel Over Crusader Victory 
On All Record-Breaking Day; New 
Features Promote Interest 



There aren't enough adjectives to 
describe the sweet delirium of a Home- 
coming which presented an undefeated 
Crusader team battening the hatches 
over another-hitherto-undefeated foot- 
ball team, Moravian, 6-0. 

Alumni returned by the hundreds to 
the campus for the Homecoming. The 
'lisp sunny day started off with the 
frosh-soph football game and the an- 
nual hockey match in the morning. 
The girls' varsity hockey team won 
their game with the alumni 1-0. The 
froth turned the tables on the sopho- 
mores, 3-0, thus winning freedom from 
drew regulations for a week. 

After an alumni luncheon, which 
followed the no-speeches precedent of 
previous Homecomings, the alumni at- 
tended the football game. Approxi- 
mately three thousand spectators 
watched the Crusaders confound the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



m^m 



Left to right, front row: Jack Helm, Coraopolis; Monk Meyers, Northumberland; John Zuback. Trafford; Blair Heaton, Pitcairn; Phil Templin, Dallas; 
Joe Greco, Atlas; John Matthews, Williamsport; Joe Campana, Williamsport; Bob Martin, Edwardsville; Steve Zeravica, Trafford; and Larry Isaacs, 
Shavertown. Middle row: Ray Conrad, Kingston; George Bass, Drexel Hill; Jim Hall, Rockwood; Bob McPall, Selinsgrove; Ken Lyons, Williamsport; 
Ed Rodgers, Trenton, N. J.; Frank Corcoran, Coraopolis; Sanford Blough, Johnstown; Ed Richards, Truckville; Joe Was, Johnstown; Joe Peyton, Red 
Bank, N. J.; and Don Ford, Altoona. Last row: Coach A. A. Stagg, Jr., Manager Daniel MacCartney, Altoona; Stan Nale, Thompsontown ; Alan Ber- 
lin, New York City; Rex Sunday, Millersburg; Marvin Maneval, Newport; Paul Stetler, Middleburg; Herman Stuempfle, Hughesville; Gilbert Weinberg- 
er, Old Forge; Howard Dye, Johnson, N. Y.; Line Coach Bob Pritchard and Assistant Tom Lewis. Sam Fletcher, Northumberland, and Dick Matthews. 
Williamsport, both varsity tackles, are not included in the photograph. 



Dean Gait Reports On 
Scholastic Situation 



Yesterday Dean Gait appeared in 
chapel and reported on the academic 
standing of students at the end of the 
first marking period. His report re- 
vealed that an abnormally large num- 
ber of students are on the delinquent 
list and must either improve their rec- 
ord by the end of the current semester 
or leave the institution. Highlighting 
his report Dean Gait announced that 
although one-third of all students fell 
into the delinquent class, ten of the 
first fifteen men on the Crusader foot- 
ball me nmeasured up scholastically ; 
as his personal bonus to those men for 
a fine record the dean announced that 
they would be placed on the dean's list 
for the remainder of the semester and 
consequently would have unlimited cuts. 

Statistics for the delinquents by 
classes indicated that an unusually 
high percentage of the sophomores and 
juniors are in scholastic difficulty. 
Fourteen per cent of the seniors are 
in the red, twenty per cent of the jun- 
iors, more than forty per cent of the 
sophomores, and forty per cent of the 
freshmen. The dean commended the 
newcomers on the fact that they have 
twenty per cent fewer delinquents than 
last year's freshmen had during a cor- 
responding period. 

Regarding the bad condition of 
scholastic affairs the dean declared 
that in most cases there was no excuse 
for failure, except that the students 
were not doing the necessary amount 
of studying. He gave as an example of 
what could be accomplished the case of 
ten first string football men who did 
acceptable work in all courses despite 
the strain and requirements of being 
members of an undefeated football 
club. Those placed on the dean's list 
yesterday include: Messrs. Heaton, Zu- 
back, Isaacs, Templin, Lyons, J. Mat- 



Crew Members Begin 
Work on "Kind Lady" 



Yoder, Brand, Mitman, Williams, 
Baxter, Mayer, and Bergstresser 
Head Working Staff 



Mary Emma Yoder and Betty Brand 
have been appointed stage manager 
and technical director, respectively, for 
"Kind Lady," announces Mr. Walter 
B. Kelly, Theatre Guild advisor. 

Mr. Kelly has also made known the 
committees and stage crews for the 
Susquehanna University Theatre 
Guild's early January production of 
"Kind Lady." 

Harold Mitman is chairman of the 
financial committee. Members are Lois 
Beamenderfer, Richard Moglia, Helen 
Hocker, and Lois Kramer. 

Philip Bergstresser is scene designer 
and master carpenter. Edward Rog- 
ers, Lawrence Cady, Larry Isaacs, 
Stephen Bergstresser, Karl Young, and 
Stanley Baxter are crew members. 

Betty Brand is chairman of the 
properties committee. Her helpers are 
Miriam Unangst, Catherine Fisher, 
Geraldine Bemiller, Betty Soley, Eli- 
nor Jane Stitt, Betty Jane White, and 
Nellie Brupbacher. 

Sara Williams is wardrobe mistress, 
with Martha Jacobs, and Ada Jayne 
Romig assisting. 

The make-up committee is Dorothy 
Holmes, Nancy Griesmer, and Dorothy 
Wanser. 

Stanley Baxter is chairman of the 
house committee. His helpers will be 
Kenneth Wilt, Ruth Schwenk, Rena 
Baker, Norma Frank, Geraldine Jones, 



ROCKWELL KENT TALKS TO AUDIENCE 
CONCERNING "ART IS FOR EVERYONE" 



Gives Condensed History of Art Through the 
Ages, Starting With Eve and Ending With Dali. 
Speaks of Future Trends in American Art 



F. and M. Entertains 
Susquehanna Editors 

Thatcher, Gundrum Learn Further 
Ins and Outs of College Newspaper 
Publication at I. N. A. Conference 

Franklin and Marshall College was 
host to fall convention of the Inter- 
collegiate Newspaper Association of the 
Middle Atlantic States, November 15 
and 16, at which time conferences were 
held and awards were given to college 
newspapers on a merit basis in news, 
editorials, advertising, and sports. 

Harry Thatcher, editor-in-chief, and 
Charles Gundrum, sports editor of 
THE SUSQUEHANNA attended as 
delegates of Susquehanna University. 

Business sessions were held early 
Friday afternoon, and later confer- 
ences in editorials, makeup, advertis- 
ing, sports, and news climaxed the af- 
ternoon's activities. A banquet was 
given in the Lancaster Y. W. C. A., 
where Dr. John A. SchaefTer, president 
of Franklin and Marshall, presented 
an address of welcome on behalf of the 
college. 

Saturday morning a general business 
session was held and later conference 
sessions reconvened. The Carnegie 
Tech-Franklin and Marshall football 
game filled out the afternoon. 

A banquet Saturday evening closed 
the convention. The main speaker was 



Clifford Graham, James Wert, Forrest Benjamin A. Fryer, author, 



thews, Fletcher, Greco, Campana, and Heckert, Betty Malone, and Jane 



Myers. 



Hutchinson. 



and former 
Eagle. 



editor of the 



traveler, 
Reading 



Staff Sleuth Accosts Crusader Grid Heroes About 
Limelight— How It Feels, and How They Found It 



Henceforth these boys belong with 
the immortals, and deserve nothing less 
than ambrosia, nectar, and solid gold 
(as well as beef) footballs. These, in 
the main, are the lads who increased 
next year's enrollment, made Home- 
coming a spectacular success, and glad- 
dened the hearts of S. U. well-wishers 
by making the 1940 football season an 
undefeated one. 
Joe Campana 

Taken alphabetically, there's Joe 
Campana. Up on the third floor of 
Selinsgrove Hall. Such a little fellow 
they wouldn't let him play on the regu- 
lar team in high school. He had to 
play sandlot instead. Then he grew 
up at S. U. Four years a running 
guard. 

Joe liked the Moravian game. "It 
was pretty tough, but after the first 
quarter I felt S. U. would win if it 
kept up its spirit." 

Before the last game, "I'm not wor- 
ried at all about Hartwick, even if there 



Sam Fletcher 

Sam Fletcher is another nice lad. 
He played four years in the Northum- 
berland high school games, three on 
the varsity, one on the junior varsity; 
but a guard all the way. 

Unreticently, Samuel informed "I'm 
sure we won it (the Moravian game) 
for Susquehanna, but Teeny helped." 

Before Saturday afternoon, he con- 
fessed, somewhat shyly, "I hope I can 
finish my college career In fine shape 
with an undefeated team." 
Joe Greco 

Joseph Francis Greco is from the 
coal regions, Mt. Carmel Township 
High School, to be specific. He grin- 



like we turned them on Moravian." 
Blair Heaton 

Another mighty Crusader is Blair 
Heaton. Chalk yellow hair plus a smile. 
He went to Pitcairn high school, there 
playing four years of football, three 
on the varsity, tackling and playing 
end. At Susquehanna he settled down 
at end. 

Moravian? With feeling. "The best 
fame I ever played." 

Hartwick? "We can't take it too 
easy," he cautioned. "Everybody's over- 
confident from the prexy on down." 
Jack Helm 

The sports writers use words like 
"smooth runner" when writing about 



ned and played his way through four Jack Helm. What words the girls at 
years there, three on the varsity, left I Coraopolis used while lie played three 
end all the way, even through Susque- , football years there, two on the var- 
hanna. I sity, will probably never be known. 

Moravian? Joe said they were "a According to Jack, Moravian "forgot 
good team but over confident. We were to show us the clipping technique of 
ready for anything they had, and they their high scores." 
weren't ready for our offensive." "I think we'll have a very good 

Before Hartwick, Joe warned, "The chance (against Hartwick)." Upon be- 



are 495 pounds playing against me, be- fellows shouldn't take it easy, because ing pressed, "We'll knock 'em off. 
cause," proudly, "I eat spaghetti." | they're liable to turn the tables on us (oCntinued on Page 4) 



Rockwell Kent, noted American ar- 
tist, spoke on the topic, "Art Is for 
Everyone," at the second Star Course 
which was given on Thursday evening 
in Seibert Chapel. 

Mr. Kent believes that art is the imi- 
tation of life which expresses the love 
of man for life. All throughout the 
ages, art has served as the medium 
through which stories and tendencies 
in human experience have been re- 
vealed. This can be seen when one 
takes a bird's eye view of the history of 
art. Up to the 19th century art dwelt 
with the realistic interpretation of life 
and after the 19th century It swung 
over to an academic art which pretti- 
fied and idealized life. Later a revolu- 
tionary movement turned to modern- 
ism in which many attempts at art 
were accepted in order that nothing of 
importance might be overlooked. At 
this time confusing and novel modes 
were introduced; but once again, Mr. 
Kent believes, the artists are turning 
to those conventions of the great past 
ages in which nature assumes an im- 
portant place. 

Mr. Kent is an American by birth, by 
training, in point of view, in his style 
of execution, and even in the nature 
of his success. His fame doesn't rest 
upon his painting alone, as he is a 
widely known lithographer, illustrator, 
author, and voyager and explorer. 

America is ready now for a real nas- 
cence of art — for its first real awaken- 
ing to an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of art. There are first of all, ar- 
tists are for the first time in centuries 
painting for everyone, not just for a 
few critics and patrons of art. Artists 
have realized at last that the ivory- 
tower is no place for them in this 
modern world. They know that they 
must understand people and speak di- 
rectly to them in their pictures if they 
are to succeed. 

Mr. Kent revealed a most humorous 
quality as a good story-teller because 
he provoked considerable laughter with 
his vivid illustrations 

Mr. Kent advocated a wider support 
of culture in America if we are to en- 
deavor to keep democracy alive. In 
regard to a surest ion for a Bureau of 
Fine Arts a blind man made this re- 
mark, "We need more beauty for more 
people." 

Mr. Kent's art works are represent- 
ed in such leading American institu- 
tions as The Metropolitan Museum Of 
Art in New York, The Art Institute m 
Chicago, the Brooklyn Museum, the 
Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh, and 
the San Francisco Museum. 

His books include "Voyaging." Wil- 
derness," "N by E," and "This Is My 
Own." Critics say that few authors 
have so clear and limpid | prose style 
His illustrations for special editions ot 
such books as "Moby Dick," "Candide," 
"The Canterbury Tales," "Beowulf." 
"Shakespeare." and "Leaves of Grass" 
have made them collectors' items 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940 



THE SUS QUEHA NNA « JOE AESOP SPEAKS » may we 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- _^^^_^_____^__^^^ ===== ^^^ = ^ = ^ = ^ ======;=====;s ^ = ; • • OU\JTvI.CrfOA 

mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated _ „,, TT .. , . 

intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. Once upon a Time there was on Old went down to the House to get tickets 

1 Grad— Class of '38. He and his girl for the Dance and to "drive an extra TUESDAY 

Subscription $2.00 a Year, Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42, Circulation Manager. Friend Myrtle— also Class of '38— were spike into the Punch, as it were"— as Coming 'Round the Mountain 

Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. fc^ f or Homecoming the Old Grad put it. The oracle of the napkin dispenser 

Repreaented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service. Inc., The Old Grad had added weight, an The Dance was a huge Success^ The -at ; thi »Na tional) »«£«■»■ » 

College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., experience Common to those who have Old Grad had his fill of Punch and good show, but it might be biased. 

Chicago Boston Los Anngeles, San Francisco. stopped playing Football. Myrtle had Myrtle found that Don and Mac, and - - • 

■ ■ that Haunted look of having Taught George, and Pete could dance as Well WEDNESDAY, THIXESDAY 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. m a H j gh school for two years. as Ever. Knute Rockne, All American 

Member of National Coll eg e Press Association. Nostalgia attacked them in over- Next day it was time to leave. Myrtle You don't want to miss this one. It's 

THF STAFF whelming waves as Myrtle and the Old waited outside while the Old Grad a good bit faster moving than the 

„._.,_- o rT^.rrv.T,™, Grad tramped the Campus. Same old rushed into the House to give the Boys average Hollywood biography (at least 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B.T^TCHER Buildings; Same old Trees; Same old a final Fraternity-House-Shake. In a they don't cast Don Ameche as Knute 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE place ^ ^^ ^^ handg ^.^ ^ minutes he rea p P eared. Rockne.) Pat OBri en is very good as 

vr^Smr EdSr Forrest Heckert the m and Appeared to Remember hav- The Old Grad shut the door behind the great mentor; he is seen as a Notre 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk ing seen them Before— Somewhere. him and stopped suddenly. He looked Dame student and later as their coach 

Sports Editor '!!!..!!!!'.!!!!!.!!.!..!!.*.""! Charles Gundrum Ah ! It was great to be Back ! Reluctant. and as a normal husband and father. 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten Their howls were Long and Loud as Myrtle looked Slightly Annoyed and Watch for Amos Alonzo Stagg, Sr. 

Reporters: G. Robert Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle they Rooted for the Team. said, "Darling, don't you think you're - - • 

Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; But the Old Grad criticized one or a little too old to be acting in this FRIDAY 

Blair Heaton, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; two plays and Myrtle sa i d that the way? Come, come! You must be Lucky Partners 

Ella FetherofT, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- cheering had been Peppier when She brave little man' Here is another of the current flock 

liamson, '43; Mar jorie Wolfe, '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, w&g Cheerleader Th e old Grad struggled visibly. His of light comedies; Ronald Coleman and 

'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford 44, Katherine becoming teary Ginger Rogers keep it up to standard. 

Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, UI course, aom were very mucn in ejes were Becoming teaiy. 5 . . 

•43- Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer, '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane terested in the game, but Myrtle hap- 'T didn t think youd be this senti- -AfnmM%AV 

Shotts '44' Dorothy Wanser, '44. pened to See Bill and Alice over in one mental," Myrtle marveled. "What's SATURDAY 

Circulation Manager . Maxine Heefner corner. When she waved they came come over you?" Wyoming 

I Fred Warner over bringing Jack and Aggie with The Old Grad made a final Effort, Wallace Beery brings this western 

Advertising Managers j Chester Shusta them, and soon they were Deep in "Well," he managed, "the door is shut well above the average Saturday night - 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, '43; Rex Sunday, '43; Dorothy Webber, Memories of glorious '38. It was very on my coat and I can't move. Do er. The plot is per- formula and they 

•43; Charles Ague, '44; Ralph Brown, '44; Jean Buffington, '44; Susanne jolly. something! don't leave a thing out: train robbery, 

Goyne, '44; Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; The game ended and everybody Myrtle rushed to his Rescue. cattle rustlers, barroom brawls, Indian 

Lois Krammer, '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. cheered Loyally and hummed their Moral: Be it Ever So humble, there's raids, and the timely arrival of the U. 

faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Busine ss, Prof. D. I. Reitz. Alma Mater in a Maudlin Sort D f Way. no place like Homecoming. S. cavalry. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940 The 8 irls moved off to Seibert Par- —Joe Aesop. MMmA _ " ~ ' 
lors for Tea and Talk while the men S MONDAY 

THE CROWDS CHEERED ==== __ = _ ===== __________^^ Rivcr s End 

. ,. . . _, ■,• ^ This is one of "those "B" pictures 

As the last echoes of the cheering crowds die away on Cm- r f /^v"pv-pv Q JAT JJ r\T"p\ C )> that turns in an "A.v worth of enter- 

sader field and as the togs of Susquehanna's undefeated team K^Jj^JJlJo IN JZ/lNJLv^ tainment. The story concerns an in- 

are hung on the pegs in the storage room, little bands of S. U. noce„ t «, -»>«*- »— 

rooters are replaying the highlights of the season over and over stuff a sou rumbling in he distance . Northwe8t Mou „, les n,, oM douMe 

again; and from their conversations the bystander might gather J™ M £3T^Z towT SKf UT *T£X% Zl "»«* *— * - to — *~ 

several great truths Which make this undefeated season a Sig- John Doe, American, takes his girl to drones overhead, no lights . . . Here TUESDAY 

nificant one tne movies - They see war news ... we are. Room for one more in this rod's Countrv 

, j, i j i- i Sense of oitv for the "poor English" — shelter, Sir . . . My next leave is in six __ ,. ,. y ^- 

Whereas in previous years disgusted fans Clamored for SUb- J \ ^J^ sort Qf J ay g Moyie month ; ge you t y hen Maybe , . . There aren t any big names in his 

Sidization Of football players, there is none Of that now — in fact over ... A coke and a couple of dances Records for the week — "Pompton ™n Tndis very well filmed I par 

most "street corner administrators" are now rather proudly in- • • • The walk home-some idle chat- Turnpike," and -swing and sweat with — liked those snow gcenes 

.... , . , ., (( , „ . ^j. * ,_ *.-_ ter— crickets chirping— An occasional Charley Barnet," by the same. The J 

sertmg a line in their address to wit: and Susquehanna s play- solUary mail plane drones overhead) Boys give their version of com off the s 

ers really play for the love Of the game; none Of them get paid green and red lights winking like fire- Cob, and they really Shell It. If any- /^\7"|7»|^ T"*IIT? 

for Dlavine " During this age When there is SO much COntro- Ales • • • More idle chatter . . . Watch one should ever get hold of Dorsey \J ViLK 1 nil • . 

r J b ;, .,° , , D u ... . ., ,. ., . .-the curb, this street light isn't too Brothers' "Honeysuckle Rose," or Jack- ATn u ,. 17rp 

versy over the merits and faults Of the Subsidy, isn t it Slgmfi- bright Dog goned borough council son Teagarten's "On the Other Side g t A1K WAVLo 

cant that Susquehanna Should g'0 undefeated Without either . . . Here we are; I'll leave you here at of the Street," this columnist will be 

financial or academic sifts? tne front P° rch ' x S uess - G ' ni S ht . see « lad to take them off your hands. n 

nnanciai Or acaaemit gilts. tomorrow . . Home to bed . . . They'll be American Classics some day. Dr T a "f' . t ....,, „ A ... 

And so the football cycle moves from extreme to extreme y Dreamless slumber . For Longhair Lovers, try -clouds- by .SJ^S iSf^fc 

making or breaking the reputation of all Who are connected John Bull, Englishman, takes his Debussy. For complete relaxation and fi g Sund afternoon 430 500 
With it. The fickle Romans crowded the Coliseum to Cheer Vic- t» to the movies They don't see war mental surcease -Twill Suffice^ • •• Theatre,' Sunday, 8 p. 

,. , i., ., * ii_ ii c j 1-4-4-1 news, or talk about it either ... Movie I'm picking Cornell over Penn by w4Rnnwn^ m rir Tho ' orios 

tors and to boo losers; the modern football fan does little more. over ' Dine and Dance The three touchdowns, Pitt over Penn state, F-JJ* B , c ^ B g ■»• ^ ■ "J" senes 

The past season has been glorious to experience. The future walk home . . Dead silence— except for and Minnesota to finish undefeated. ^^eat Ftar^Suadta, S-4 p. m., WJZ- 

may not hold such records, but come what may we can always -= nbc network. The third of three 

look intelligently upon the coaches' problems and "play the ttT) \ "XT"F\/^\"\/f C"D/^\T> TC" Shakespearean plays is scheduled. The 

game for the sport of playing^' KAlNiJ UM 3lUf\15 "HLZLSEL* sunua,, ,:. 

■ „ '. " . ! ™ ! „, . . ! . p. m„ WABC-CBS network. 

COLLEGE MATERIAL, OR NOT? Greetings and salutations to all you American Collegiate Sports Weekly) in Everyman - S n^g, (Arch oboler) 

Now that the shock of the mid^emester reports has worn guys and gals wh °- like w^-™ its P rediction of our ^ m ^ w ^ "f " WJv, 9:30 p. nx., vveaf-nbc Red 

. , . , , . . ,, staunch athletic boosters of dear old wick "hit the nail on the head." They This program presents the works of 

off and the dean has delivered his semi-annual shot-in-the-arm s n My object in writing this col . had Susquehanna winning by a 13 . the most outstanding writer for radio 

speech in chapel we Students can settle down into the tradition- umn is to acquaint you with all (well, p0 i nt margin. Evidently, they vision- today. 

al "rut" and coast along until the final appear on the horizon. nearl y all) the little highlights and ed tne USU ai let-down after a great • - - 

.,",., . , , , .. .„ . sidelights that occur in sporting events triumuh like the Moravian upset (up- Music: 

This, we say, IS a possibility; for some, no doubt, it Will become involving Crusader interests Many ™ pn all e bu \ Susqueha nnans) . . New York Philharmonic Symphony, 

reality. Such persons are not college material, and we are glad fans wonder whether Moravian just Monk Meyers surely deserves a share Sunday, 3 p. m.. WABC-CBS, John 

to see that Susquehanna is taking definite steps toward remov- had an off da y when the ? P la y ed our In the credit for that win over the Barbiraiii, conductor. 

n .. Crusaders or whether we really were Iroquois. Did you happen to notice NBC Symphony Orchestra, Satur- 

ing them from ner rolls. t00 g00d f01 . t hem. I can answer that that it was not until after Monk en- day, 10 p. m., WJZ-NBC Blue, Hans 

The most significant part Of Dean Gait's report yesterday one pretty quickly. This '40 Susque- tered the game that the Stagg eleven Wilhelm Steinber-g, conductor, until 

morning was the fact that most Of those students who are hanna team could knock off just about rea n y started rolling? . . . Our hats are Autura Toscanini takes over the baton 

. & , , .. .._. ,, , , ., j . any team in the country if they set ff to you, gridders! You have done November 23rd. 

now in scholastic difficulty are SO merely because they do not their minds on accomplisning such a Susque Lnna proud. The varsity elev- Philadelphia Orchestra, Sunday, 3: 15- 

do enough work. Students are inclined to Use extra-CUrricular notable feat. At any rate, I still think en> a n members of the squad and the 4 : oo, WOR. 

activities as excuses for poorly-prepared assignments. With our team was more than one touch- managers, the coaches, the band, and s 

... , FT, 1 7 .. ... down better than the Greyhounds, the student bodv all contributed their ht a a tw u t 

all the admitted value of these extra-curricular activities we what d0 you think? . . At H orton .. bit " to this always to be remembered W. A. A. hlolds Large 
believe they are dearly-bought if they interfere materially with Dining Hail the memorable evening of 1940 grid season. The Susquehanna Football Victory Dance 

the regular Classroom work. With this in view we WOUld advise November 9 one of the Moravian foot- staff salutes you . . . Now that the 

b . 4| . , , . .„ . - -. - ball players, upon being congratulated football season is by the board we find Saturday night was the climax of a 

every student to take StOCk OI nimsell ana to discard any ac- for his great playing that day, re- that it is high time we focused our gaze victorious day, and also a victorious 

tivities Which are making undue demands upon his study pro- marked "The best team won." What ove r to the basketball court. Susque- season for our football heroes. A dance. 

more proof could you ask for concern- hanna is swinging into what may be sponsored by the ~Vl. A. A., was held in 

■ , , . „ ing the greatness of our team? . . its most successful cage season in years, the gym to celebr* ate this great occas- 

Most Students, also, WOllld do well to CUt down materially what we are wondering now is wheth- A t least, present indications look that ion. 

the amount of time spent on social "diversion" and on "bull er or not Glenn Musser is going to wa y . . . Among the returning members An entertainment was arranged be- 

spqsinns" and tn snenri this time in earnest concentration at the stand b ^ that s t atement wnich ne of the squad are Don Ford, Gene tween dances (just to give the football 

sessions ana to spena tins time in earnest tontentiduoiidi km m&de &t ^ football dinner last week smUh m ^ Heaton phU Templini players a cnance t0 mt) A very 

Study desk. Academic achievemet IS the greatest Single goal It went something like this: "Beat Jac k Walsh, Stan Stonesifer, Jim Mc- unique arrangement of "Sweet Sue'' 

to be achieved by the Student, and the Wise student Will allow Hartwick and we'll give 'em another cord, Larry Isaacs, Al Parcells, Chet and "My Blue Heaven" was composed 

nA »V.W*» tr, Hivoi-t Viic ottpntinn frnm it one " A Te ^ is ea K erl y awaited . . . shusta, Chuck Kleine, and John May- by Clyde Sechler and sung by Louise 

notning to aivui nis HWOWn uuiu it. Did yQU know th&t the f00tball squad ef gmce football is com p le ted, all McWilliams, Doris Welsh, and Dot 

S received a "beef" football following members are able to attend practice Holmes. Boy, died they swing it— yea, 

A GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT their victory over Hartwick last Sat- sessions regularly . . . The promising man! 

T nit vpnr tho Fritnmitv Senate was set UD to eovern over urday? BiU Sullivan - class of ' 33 and freshman prospects include Ralph In between all this fancy "rug cut- 
Last yeai trie Maternity benate was set up to govern oyei a member of SusqU ehanna's only other B rown. Bill Janson. Herm Stuempfle, ting" punch was in great demand to 

all inter-fraternity affairs, especially the rushing and pledging undefeated team, made this unique Pn il Plummer, Dick lioglte, Stuard wet the whistles of all the couples. The 

Of new men. Instead Of making a long list Of laws to govern presentation. He is a representative Flickinger, Marlin Bollinger, and Dave W. A. A. girls certainly planned for 

., ., *. -1 u_a. „ „„»,+i„ mQ „'e oi Swift and Company ... A good ex- Gross. the comfort of their guests. They sang 

rushing activities the three groups entered into a gentlemen s planatlon of the division of the spoils u a song written t0 f he tune J .. ut 

Agreement that they WOUld Use no practices in rushing and m the Hartwick game might well be There Be Love." We mustn't forget 

pledging Which they considered to be unfair and that they made by saying "Susquehanna took the Bennage and PIMM 1 Speak our fam ous quartet composed of Gus 

«nu1H nhov the ^imnle rules set nn Aecordine to all reports f °° tba11 game &nd Hartwick took the On Origins of Great Hymns Kaufman, Carl Youngr, Clyde Sechler, 

WOUia Obey the Simple lUlCS set Up. ACCOiaing to ail lepo. ls> glory .. It is true t hat our team was 6 J and Melvin Jones . They were whipping 

this agreement worked well last year and consequently the a bit off color . . . Just in case you it out again in their swing version of 

inter-f raternitV spirit was greatly improved. This same plan is couldn't figure out why that pass on Vespers Sunday evening was in the "Shortnin' Bread ." By the great ap- 

4... . , ,., f V^„ . which Phil Templin made such a beau- form of a song service led by Ellen Ben- lause they received, there is no ques- 

being Used this year, and we Should like to urge every memDei Uful catch lftSt week went for naught nage and Catharine Fisher. Catharine tion as to whether or not they were 

of each fraternity to assume personal responsibility for the car- I'll brighten you on the subject. Phil told how the songs that were sung enjoyed— immensely! 

rvino- nut nf this aorepment Evervone Will Cain if the plan was eligible to receive the pass all came to be written, Betty Malone sang All good things must come to an end 

lynifc, uut ui mu a i . . y • ; , right, but there was a back in motion "I Need Thee Every Hour." The Bene- as did this gala, affair, with all the 

proves successful; one little infraction may bring demanas tnat on thp play It mlght interest you dic tion was pronounced by Dr. Kretch- lads and lassies trucking up to the 

it be abandoned. to know that "The Football News" (The man. dorm at 10:30. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



CRUSADERS FINISH SEASON UNDEFEATED 



-<&- 



Susquehanna Beats 
Hartwick in Finale 



Crusaders Overcome Iroquois Scoring 
Threats to Win, 13-0; Greco, Fletch- 
er, Matthews, Campana End Career 



Susquehanna's mighty Crusaders 
smashed their way to a 13-to-0 victory 
over the Iroquois Warriors of Hart- 
wick last Saturday afternoon to climax 
their forty- eighth grid campaign with 
the second undefeated season in the 
history of the intercollegiate sport at 
Selinsgrove. The game was played on 
windswept University Field, and put a 
grand and glorious finishing touch to 
a great season. 

Prior to this game Hartwick had lost 
five of the six games it had played. 
Susquehanna had not met with a set- 
back in its previous nine engagements. 

S. U.'s initial tally was the result of 
a concerted 67-yard drive just before 
the close of the first half. Steven Zera- 
vica, 200-pound fullback, got the drive 
in motion with a sensational 46-yard 
smash off tackle. He was finally 
brought down on the Hartwick 16-yard 
line. Just as it was apparent that the 
Crusader attack had been halted, a 
15-yard penalty for unnecessary rough- 
ness was inflicted on Hartwick. This 
placed the ball on the one-yard line, 
and two plays later Zeravica swept 
wide around his left end for the score. 
Zeravica held the ball as Heaton suc- 
cessfully converted the bonus point 
with a placement kick. 

Early in the fourth period with Hart- 
wick taking to the air in a vain effort 
to even up the count, diminutive Larry 
Isaacs, Crusader quarterback, inter- 
cepted a long pass tossed by Beams. 
The "mighty mite" of Susquehanna 
apparently came out of nowhere to 
snare the ball on the dead run on Hart- 
wick's 45-yard line and then proceeded 
to race down his right sideline unmo- 
lested for a final important six points. 
This time Heaton's attempted place- 
ment kick for the extra point sailed 
wide of the uprights. Thereafter, the 
air was filled with passes by both 
teams, but numerous interceptions left 
both clubs stalemated. 

DePalma dropped back to attempt 
a field goal midway in the first period, 
but a fumble on the pass from center 
prevented him from getting it off. The 
ball was on the Susquehanna 25-yard 
line at the time. Later in the period 
Redden, a fearless backfield all by him- 
self, raced around his left end from a 
punt formation at midfleld to the Cru- 
sader 16-yard line. Campana recov- 
ered a fumble on the next play to turn 
aside this serious threat. 

Hartwick fought doggedly all the 
way. A less courageous team might 
have folded up in the face of the over- 
whelming odds that were stocked 
against it. But not this team. They 
rose to turn aside practically all Sus- 
quehanna threats. 

Four seniors — great "fighters" who 
were largely responsible for much of 
the season's success: Joe Greco, end; 
Sam Fletcher, tackle; John Matthews, 
guard; and Joe Campana, guard, clos- 
ed brilliant gridiron careers in this 
game. Greco, Fletcher, and Matthews 
comprised the senior co-captain tri- 
umvirate and were regulars with the 
Crusader varsity since their freshman 
year. Campana came to Susquehanna 
without any past high school experi- 
ence and is ranked as one of the out- 
standing running guards in recent local 
football history. 
Line-ups and statistics: 

Hartwick Susquehanna 

Boisvert L. E Greco 

Raftis L. T. ...R.Matthews 

Rigano L. G Campana 

Wilber C Templin 

Bernard R. G. ... J.Matthews 

Savino R. T Fletcher 

McElliott R. E Heaton 

Schluep Q. B Zuback 

Beams L. H. B Isaacs 

Redden R. H. B Helm 

DePalma F. B Zeravica 

Hartwick 0— 

Susquehanna 7 6—13 

S.U. Hartwick 

First downs 9 6 

First downs, passes 2 

First downs, rushes 7 6 

Yards gained rushing 257 124 

Yards lost rushing 20 26 

Yards gained passes 42 29 

Passes attempted 14 7 

Passes completed 2 1 

Passes intercepted by 5 3 

Ave. yardage of punts 29 28 

Ave. yardage of runbacks . . 10 20 

Fumbles 2 3 

Opp. fumbles recovered by 2 2 

Yards lost, penalties 30 15 



-4>- 



-■$■- 



Moravian Defeated 
In Spectacular Upset 



3000 Fans See Greyhounds Outplay- 
ed, Outrun, Outpassed and Badly 
Shaken in Homecoming Classic 



To the enjoyment of 3000 alumni 
and students the Susquehanna Univer- 
sity Crusaders smashed Moravian's 
perfect record, 6-0, a victory which 
kept them in the undefeated class, No- 
vember 9. 

Not since 1932 have the Orange and 
Maroon toppled the steel-town rivals, 
and at the kick-off whistle the odds 
were against the home team. 

Outgained on the ground, the Cru- 
saders went overhead to score their 
touchdown. It came early in the sec- 
ond period, when Steve Zeravica flung 
a 23-yard pass into the arms of Blair 
Heaton who was standing on the ene- 
my's door sill and stepped across. This 
one thrust, executed in only four plays, 
proved enough to win, although during 
the last minutes of play this margin 
looked very slim. 

Moravian with six straight wins 
fought back fiercely, moving overland 
at first, and then in desperation took 
to the air. When the game ended the 
Greyhounds were on the home team's 
six yard line. 

The visiting team had several chances 
to score. Interference on Jim McCon- 
logue's long forward, intended for 
Steve Sydorak, gave the Greyhounds 
first down on the Orange and Maroon 
19 late in the first. But Larry Rosati, 
quarterback, fumbled twice in a row 
and the second time Johnny Matthews, 
Crusader right guard, recovered. 

Then, in the waning stages, Morav- 
ian drove from its 34 to the Crusaders' 
14, reeling off four first downs en 
route. Passes gained most of the 
ground on the belated drive, so the 
Greyhounds kept the ball in the air. 
Dave Griffith, reserve back, slipped 
one through the air to McConlogue and 
the latter was stopped on the Orange 
and Maroon one yard line. Here a 
break came to the home team. Morav- 
ian called for time out, but had used 
up its rest period quota. After three 
no-gain plays, time was again used 
up and the Greyhounds took another 
five-yard setback. 

A 30-yard return of an intercepted 
forward by Johnnie Zuback put the 
home team in the blue, late in the 
third. After three tries thru the line, 
Heaton tried his unsuccessful field goal. 

What really hurt the Moravian elev- 
en was its fumbles. Dropping the ball 
seven times, the opposition recovered 
twice to remove serious scoring threats 
by the visitors. 

Statistics and lineup: 

S.U. Moravian 

9 

3 

6 

133 

58 

52 

22 
4 

16 
2 

11 
403 

19 


92 

7 
3 

20 



First downs 7 

First down by passes 4 

First downs by rushes 3 

Yards gained by rushing ... 123 

Yards lost 35 

Yards gained by passing ... 133 
Forward passes attemtped . . 13 

Completed 5 

Incomplete 7 

Intercepted 1 

Number of punts 12 

Yardage of punts 382 

Ave. runback 4 

Blocked punts 

Kickoff s, yardage 41 

Ave. run-back 36 

Fumbles 3 

Ball lost 2 

Yards lost, penalties 5 



Senior Gals Champs In 
Hockey Round Robin 

In the last game of Girls' Interclass 
Hockey, which was played several days 
ago, the seniors defeated the sopho- 
mores, 4-0. 

The seniors, by winning that game, 
kept their slate clean and came through 
the season undefeated. They won six 
straight games and won the champion- 
ship for the second straight year, hav- 
ing won it before in 1939. 

This is the first time in Susque- 
hanna's hockey history that any class 
of seniors has won a class champion- 
ship. 

The seniors are very proud of their 
victories and the following seniors are 
to be congratulated for taking part in 
the round-robin: Hutchison, captain; 
Mendenhall, Crompton, B e n n a g e , 
Tribby, Miller, West, Davis, Specht, 
Beamenderfer, Reese, Reitz, Poor- 
baugh, and Ritter. 



At Last the Football Cycle Swings Upward 




Varsity Skill Wins In 
Rousing- Alumnae Game 

The annual hockey game between 
the Girls' Varsity Hockey team and the 
alumnae resulted in a 1-0 victory for 
the varsity team. However, the alum- 
nae proved to the varsity team that 
'they hadn't forgotten much that they 
had learned about hockey. They pro- 
vided stiff opposition throughout the 
whole game. Among the alumnae re- 
turning to play were Madeline Hayes. 
Grace Fries, Eleanor Saveri, Naomi 
Binngaman, Louise West and others. 
Since the alumnae did not have a full 
team they solicited the aid of Bob 
Fisher, Bill Nye and Dick Barry, who 
kept the game going with their spec- 
tacular playing. The only goal scored 
was made in the last half after a great 
deal of hard work on the part of the 
varsity team. The game was exciting 
from start to finish. 



HEAD COACH A. A. STAGG, JR. 
LINE COACH ROBERT PRITCHARD 
Coach Stagg is in his sixth year as mentor of the Crusaders; since his coming 
here in 1935 he he.* seen the local eleven go through trying seasons, some- 
times without winning a single game. He is pleased to see that at last the 
Crusader outlook is becoming brighter. "Bob" Pritchard, a former Susque- 
hanna grid star, has assisted as line coach since 1936. Both men will now 
turn their entire energies toward the basketball court where already squads 
are in training. 



Statistics Show Net Pres. Smith Honors 
Achievementof Team S. U. Football Team 



-s- 



-Patronlze Susquehanna advertisers 



"We present herein, a few statistics 
with regard to the accomplishments of 
S. U.'s gridders as compared to those 
of our opponents for this season. 

Susquehanna rolled up a net yard- 
age of 1428 yards on the ground to 
their opponents' 746 yards to score a 
total of 120 points to 38. Susquehanna 
merited 70 first downs to 60 for the 
opposition. 

In the field of passes, Susquehanna 
attempted 84 and completed 27, inter- 
cepting six of their opponents' passes. 
Opponents attempted 117, completed 
27, and intercepted 15 of Susquehanna's 
passes. 

The individual accomplishments in 
scoring are listed as follows: 
Player Touchdowns Points 

Zeravica 5 30 

Heaton 4 *36 

Isaacs 4 24 

Zuback 2 12 

"Wos 2 12 

Helm 1 6 

* 12 conversions. 

Yardage gained by individuals was: 
Player Attempts Yardage Aver. 
Isaacs 50 487 9.74 
Helm 57 357 6.26 
Zeravica 88 423 4.8 
"Wos 66 270 4.1 
Heaton caught 13 out of 42 passes 
from Zeravica which netted 219 yards. 
Greco was given eight passes, of which 
he caught four, an average of 50''. 
S 



Frosh Squelch Sophs 
In 3-1 Victory Tilt 



Home Talent Music, Speeches, and 
Songs Add to Gay Spirit of Turkey 
Dinner for the Undefeated 



Speedy, Efficient Team Wins New 
Flume for Frosh; Flickinger and 
Brown Star for Winners 



Stuart Flickinger. 160 pound full- 
back, made good a last period field goal 
attempt to provide the 1940 freshman 
grid team with a glorious 3 to vic- 
tory over the sophomores in their bit- 
terly fought contest Saturday, Novem- 
ber 9. The affair, an annual Home- 
coming Day highlight, was played in 
the morning on University Field. Ideal 
weather conditions prevailed and an 
unusually large crowd looked on, in- 
cluding a highly spirited and enter- 
taining freshman band. 

The big fullback's placement boot 
sailed neatly over the crossbar from 
the 12-yard line with only three min- 
utes of play remaining in the final per- 
iod after the frosh had bobbled numer- 
ous scoring opportunities. 



The victory over Moravian last week 
was more than a football victory, for 
it was also the opportunity for Dr. G. 
Morris Smith to keep his promise and 
give the football team and all the stu- 
dents who eat in Horton Dining Room 
a big turkey dinner. 

Dr. John J. Houtz got ahold of his 
Student Councils and with the help 
of Jane Hutchison, president of Wom- 
en's Student Council, and Glenn Mus- 
ser, president of Men's Student Coun- 
cil, planned a very appropriate ban- 
quet in honor of the team. 

The football tables and council 
tables were placed in the middle of the 
room and each member of the team 
and the council members were given 
party hats and noise makers in order 
toto make it a gala affair. The fac- 
ulty also was present and similarity 
honored. 

The impressive score of the game, 
6-0, was posted on the wall as were 
the numerals 1940 and a large S. U. 

President Smith was master of cere- 
monies and introduced a new campus 
swing band under the direction of 
James Wert, which played during din- 
ner. Many old-time favorite songs 
were sung. These were led by Clyde 
Sechler. 

Coach Stagg and his assistants were 
individually honored, as were the three 
co-captains. Greco, Fletcher, and Mat- 
thews, and each of them said a few 
words about the success of the 1940 
football season. 



It was Ralph Brown who set up the 
game-winning play which gave the 
freshmen a week without dress regu- 
lations. He snared a punt at midfleld 
and dashed down the sideline to the 
sophomore's 7-yard line before being 
knocked out of bounds. After filling 
to gain, the field goal was kicked. 

Freshmen Sophomores 

Adonizio L. E Klinger 

Clark L. T MacCartncy 

D.Shafer L. G Eastep 

J. Schaeffer C Wolfe 

Bollinger R. G Emlet 

Janson R. T Mussulman 

Rummer r. e Curry 

Schueler Q B Milford 

Brown L. H. B Stibcr 

Lohman R. H. B Walsh 

Flickinger F. B Kemberling 

Substitutions: Freshmen — Graham, 
Bittinger, Bodner, Hochstuhl, Reichley. 
Attinger. Howell, Hunter; Sophomores 
— Kourtz, Startzel, James, Hugus. 



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Fountain Pens and Pencils 

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Tries to give the College Students 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE 8USQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940 



Grads Honored by Frats 
At Homecoming Dances 

Each of Susquehanna's fraternities 
entertained their returning members 
in grand style at the annual Home- 
coming dances. An unusually large 
number of old grads were present at 
the three parties, tripping the light 
fantastic with their wives and sweet- 
hearts. 

Beta Kappans held forth at their 
chapter house to the rhythms of Eddie 
Gordon and his orchestra. Neil Fisher, 
social chairman for the house, was in- 
strumental in making the evening the 
success that it was. 

Phi Mu Delta members, celebrating 
the 25th anniversary of the founding 
of their house, danced to the music of 
Art Wendell's orchestra. Dan Mac- 
Cartney was social chairman. 

Bond and Key held their dance at 
the gymnasium with Howard Gale's or- 
chestra providing the inspiration. Mel- 
vin Jones was social chairman. 



S. A. I. Visits Bucknell 
For Swarthout Concert 



Last Monday evening Sigma Alpha 
Iota went to Bucknell to hear Gladys 
Swarthout. a sorority honorary. The 
girls were taken in the private cars of 
the Conservatory faculty and others. 
Miss Swarthout, exquisitely gowned in 
gold, made a beautiful appearance. Her 
voice brought varied comments. Some 
of the girls thoroughly enjoyed her; 
some were a little disappointed; while 
others definitely disliked her singing. 



previous experience. Despite this fact 

he has shown promise at left halfback, 

where he won his major award this 

season. 

Johnny Matthews 

Matthews, J., known more commonly 
as Johnny, played two years on the 
Williamsport high school varsity, after 
one as a J. V.. both tackling and guard- 
ing. He only guarded at S. U. 

After mumbling something about the 
Homecoming tilt with Moravian being 
a "very tough game," and "I have a 
very sweet disposition," he hurried 
away. It was meal time 
Dick Matthews 

Matthews, R., "R" for Dick, is the 
little brother of the Matthews combin- 
ation. A nice lad. like his brother, he 
played for Williamsport three years, 
two on the varsity. At S. U., remaining 
consistent, he has played three more 
at left tackle. 

"The happiest thing about the whole 
(Moravian) game," he says, "was the 
fact that Fritchman, especially, wasn't 
so cocky afterwards." 

He was also pleased, Friday, that 
Hartwick would go down to defeat Sat- 
urday. 
Monk Myers 

Monroe J. Myers, the "J" stands for 
Monk, is another of the Northumber- 
land contingent on campus. He play- 
ed four years for the dear old Pine- 
knotters, three on the varsity, half- 
back all the way. 

About the Homecoming game with 
Moravian. "Tough game — but I 
wouldn't know." 

Hartwick? "It'll be tough, but not as 
tough as Moravian." 



Phil Templin 

Phil Templin is the tall boy, you 
must have seen him, towering up 
above. He comes from Dallas, Penn- 
sylvania, where he played four years 
of football for dear old Dallas, three 
on the varsity, mostly as a center, 
though one year a back. 

Moravian? "Best game we played 
since I've been here. Everybody played 
a bangup game. They were all in the 
groove." 

The last game? "If Hartwick starts 
going through our line, I think we'll 
wake up and go to town." 
Joe Wos 

Ask any freshman who Wos is. Or 
ask a sports writer. Or ask a sign. If 
the sign reads, "A Quitter Never Wins 
and a Winner Never Quits," it knows 
Wos. He played six years of football 
for Johnstown Central High and Gar- 
field Junior High. 

Moravian? "Fairly tough. One of 
the hardest games I ever played in." 

Hartwick? "I think we have a chance 
to beat Hartwick's big boys if we're not 
over-confident. We have more of a 
chance in the air." 
Steve Zeravica 



REFLECTIONS OF OUR 
FESTIVE HOMECOMING 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Greyhounds, 6-0. 

Following the game the college band 
victory-marched through downtown 
Selinsgrove, followed by the freshman 
Indian maidens. 

In the evening the three fraternities 
held dances to celebrate the return of 
their members. 

A big pep rally was held in the gym 
Friday night. Members of the 1932 un- 
defeated football team spoke. After a 
victory bonfire was foresightedly burnt, 
the student body followed the band 
through town. Then came dancing in 
the gym, plus cider and candy with 
Clyde Sechler mastering ceremonies. 

A decoration precedent was estab- 
lished this Homecoming. Instead of 
the unsightly (alas! uncontrolled) 
trimmings of former years, the cam- 
pus was decorated by each housing 
unit. 

S 

STAFF SLEUTH ACCOSTS 
CRUSADER GRID HEROES 



strand 

1 11 f A I R I 
sunbury 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Larry Isaacs 

Larry Isaacs is one of those lads who 
are bright not only on the football 
field, but also in the classroom, or vice 
versa. If he kept a scrapbook of the 
number of times he's been mentioned 
on the sport pages, he'd be keeping a 
second one now. 

Wary of being quoted, Larry declared 
the Moravian game "a lot of fun." 
Hartwick? It would be a "tough one." 
Ken Lyons 

Accosted about the Moravian game 
this blond back remarked: "I believe 
that game was won largely by the 
strength of the line; during the second 
half that line played with their heart." 
He was skeptical about the Hartwick 
game because a number of the Crusad- 
ers were injured. 

Ken took up football for the first 
time at Susquehanna, having had no 



WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Kenny Baker 
Frances Langford 



Hit Parade of 1941' 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Tyrone Power 
Linda Darnell 



"Mark of Zorro" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

Dick Powell 
Ellen Drew 

in 

"Christmas in July" 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 



GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • • 

TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 19 

"Comin' Round the 
Mountain" 

Bob Burns 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
NOVEMBER 20 AND 21 

"Knute Rockne 
All-American" 

Pat O'Brien 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 

"Lucky Partners" 

Ronald Colman 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23 

"WYOMING" 

Wallace Berry 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25 

"RIVER'S END" 



Between 

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Vegetable Soup, Baked Beans, 

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WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



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Next To Rekhley'a 
SHOE SHINE 



Compliments of 

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Compliments of 

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BIRDS EYE FOOD DEALER 

MEATS and GROCERIES 



"Slinging Steve," they call Zeravica, 
and nearly everyone calls him. One of 
the Crusader mainstays, he went to 
Trafford High School, where he played 
four years of football, only one on the 
junior varsity, but all over the back- 
field. 

Moravian? Loftily, "The easiest 
game I ever played in." 

Hartwick? S. U. would beat them 
"absolutely — without any doubt — and 
by four touchdowns. 
Johnny Zuback 

Johnny Zuback also comes from 
Trafford. One of the blushier Crusad- 
ers. He played four years on the var- 
sity, three as a tackle, and one on the 



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this year a quarterback, Johnny, like 
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right well by himself this year. 



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THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

GETTYSBURG. PA. 

A fully accredited theological in- 
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For Information addreei: 

JOHN ABERLY, PrMldant 



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Think of 

Schindler Studio 

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Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



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SUNBURY 
B. P. O. Edwards, Manager 



MOYER'S SHOE 
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Ffth and Market Streets 
SUNBURY 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

(HILTON PENS 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 

STATIONERY 



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STATE COLLEGE, PA. 
Official Photographers 1939 Lanthorn 



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Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



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Welcomes Students' Accounts 



FOR SCHOOL NEWS 
READ 

THE SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



Observation Blanks For Teacher Practice 
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Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



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SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selhurrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 

courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

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A.B.. B.S., and Mus. B. degrees 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., DD., Pre*. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 






Highlights 
Of the Week 



Business Society Meets Tonight 

The Business Society will hold an 
open meeting in Steele Science, room 
100, at 7:30 tonight to hear an address 
by Luther Redcay on the problem of 
jobs and how to find them. 
Bond and Key Smoker Tonight 

The Bond and Key Club will enter- 
tain prospective pledges at their an- 
nual smoker tonight. 
Phi Mu Delta Smoker Tomorrow 

Phi Mu Delta Fraternity will play 
host to freshmen and other guests to- 
morrow evening in the second of the 
series of smokers by the fraternal 
groups. 
O. D. S. Party for Children 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority will 
entertain the under-privileged children 
of Selinsgrove at a Christmas party 
in their sorority room Thursday even- 
ing from 5:30 to 7:30 p. m. 
Band Skating Party Thursday 

Members of the Susquehanna Uni- 
versity Band are planning a roller- 
skating party at the Island Park Rink 
for Thursday evening from 7 to 10 
p. m. 
Beta Kappa Smoker Thursday 

Beta Kappa Fraternity will conclude 
the series of fraternity smokers when 
they entertain the freshmen on Thurs- 
day evening at 8 p. m. 
Fraternity Quiet Period Friday 

According to the Fraternity Senate 
ruling the period from 8 a. m. to 4 
p. m. Friday will be set aside as quiet 
period. The fraternities have agreed 
to cease all rushing activity of any 
form. During this period the pledging 
period will extend from 1 to 4 p. m., 
December 13. Students wishing to 
pledge may do so by reporting to the 
fraternity of their choice during this 
period. 
Soph Hop Saturday Evening 

The Sophomore Class will entertain 
guests at their annual dance in Alumni 
Gym from 8 to 12 on Saturday even- 
ing. Bruce Bell will provide the mu- 
sic. The admission cost will be $1.50 
per couple. 
Christmas Banquet Monday 

All students of Susquehanna, in- 
cluding fraternity men and day stu- 
dents, will banquet together in Horton 
Dining Room at 6 p. m. at the annual 
Christmas dinner. 
S. C. A. Christmas Party 

The Student Christian Association 
has planned an elaborate program for 
their annual Christmas party to be 
held on Monday evening. All students 
are invited to take part. 
Vacation Begins Wednesday 

The Christmas recess will begin at 
12 noon on Wednesday, December 18; 
classes will begin at 1 p. m. on Thurs- 
day, January 2. 
Next Issue January 7 

With this issue The Susquehanna 
completes its activity for the calendar 
year; the next issue will appear on 
Tuesday, January 7. 

S 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, 1LESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940 



Number 15 



A NEW RECITATION HALL IN 1943 



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V*" 



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v ,-r«M*^ 







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FLOTATION HAL!. 



ADDlTtCM K 

STEtU SCIENCE UALI. 



tvatu soon hall 



retuM 

MUTATION UALL 



FftCLlMlNA.r.Y *1U»Y 



SU S QUI; H ANNA UNIVERSITY 



■SfcLIMSGf.CVE rSNKA 



U**i» v s 



Susquehanna University new recitation hall will be located in line with the present Steele Science Hall and on the east side 
of that building. The new building will be parallel to the new campus drive which was constructed in 1935, and will com- 
mand the spacious "commons" which replaces the area now occupied by Gustavus Adolphus Hall. The future campus plan 
is to have all the academic buildings in line with Steele Science Hall and the buildings will be connected by an arch-way. 



Dr. Wickey Asserts 
Importance Today of 
Christian Education 



— $>- 



Snowball to Feature 
Soph Dance Saturday 



Saturday evening, December 14, the 
Alumni Gymnasium will be the scene 
of one of the biggest affairs of the year. 
At that time, the sophomore class will 
stage the most important event in its 
history thus far — the traditional "Soph 
Hop." The music for the occasion will 
be furnished by Bruce Bell and his or- 
i Continued on Page 4) 
S 



Dr. Gould Wickey, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Board of Education of the 
United Lutheran Church, was on our 
campus today. After giving an interest- 
ing talk in chapel, he was glad to con- 
fer with the ministerial students. He 
will speak to the pre-theological club 
this evening. 

Dr. Wickey in his speech issued a 
stirring challenge to Dr. Keppel, who 
said that independent colleges should 
be done away with. There are three 
important reasons why church colleges 
are, and should be, maintained. First. 
the Christian, college affords a com- 
plete education since the religious de- 
velopment is just as important as that 
of factual acquisition. This complete 



Christmas Program 
Planned by S. C. A. 



<?>- 



4- 



Special Chapel Service, Caroling, 
Refreshments and Entertainment to 
Be Featwres o' 0!»br»«ii»n 



SUSQUEHANNA PLANS SPECIAL GOAL 
FOR 85th FOUN DING AN NIVERSARY 

Campaign Opened by Group Representatives 
For Fund Necessary to Begin Work on New 
Classroom Building; Aim for Completion in 1943 

rr y -, ~~j - ~j^ Plans for the accomplishment of a 

1 en SlUdentS Attend new buildin S for Susquehanna Univer- 
sity were laid at the dinner which was 
LCJ A A r\ O held on Friday evening in Horton Din- 

• U. A. A. vOHierenCe ing Hall. Representatives of the var- 
ious organizational units of the Uni- 
versity were present and discussed this 
special goal for the 85th Anniversary 
of the University which will take place 
in 1943. 
As soon as $75,000 for the new build - 



Elaine Miller announced today that 
the annual S. C. A. Christmas program 
will be held Monday evening, Decem- 
ber 16. There will be an interesting 
program given in the chapel. The ex- 
act nature of this program was not dis- 
closed but one can be certain that 
there will be beautiful Christmas mu- 
sic and a beautiful portrayal of the 
Christmas story in some form. Those 
in charge of this program are Flo 
Reitz, Mary Emma Yoder, and Red 
Mltman. Ten Susquehanna students attended j &*• and $25,000 for additional endow- 

Following the formal celebration in j the Penn State Area meeting of the i ment Is attained the actual work will 
the chapel the entire group will go on ■ Lutheran Students of America, which I begin. A sketch of the proposed new 



Dunkelberger Talks on "Thy King- 
dom Come;" Wilt Elected President 
of Area; Yarnell, Vice President 



the traditional tour throughout the 

town. After an hour or so of joyous 

education gives youth the opportunity s i ng i ng , the group will return to Sei- 

bert, where refreshments will be served. 
Those in charge of the food are Mir- 



to become that which it rightfully 
should be. 

Second, Christian education is the 
means to prevent "the spread of the 
jungle." The forces of evil will not 



and 



To Play Villain Role 




iam Unangst, Evie Williamson 
Elaine Miller. 

Jack Walsh, Forrest Heckert, Merle 
| be overcome by organization or legis- I Hoover, Harry Thatcher, and Cornelia 
j lation, but by the cultivation of proper j G rothe are planning a special enter- 
I attitudes and Christian values. < tainment to be given while the carol- 

Third, Christian colleges maintain ers enjoy their food, 
and develop the high moral and spirit- | This S. C. A. program has always 
ual values. | been a high light in every student's 

"When many people fail to support Christmas celebration, and from all 
the church in its efforts to carry out J indications this program will be one ' Ashram were shown. A business meet 
(Continued on Page 4) I of the best ever given. (Continued on Page 4) 

<S> I 



was held Sunday afternoon and even- 
ing at Bucknell University. 

The theme of the conference. "Thy 
Kingdom Come," was given by Dr. 
George Dunkelberger at the opening 
service, after which the students di- 
vided into discussion groups where the 
component parts of the theme were 
elaborated. Dr. Paul Ovrebo and Miss 
Bertha Hein were leaders of two of the 
groups. A summary of each of the 
groups was given and the meeting ad- 
journed to a local restaurant for the 
conference dinner. 

After dinner the pictures of the 1940 



Wheels of Drama Revolve as "Kind Lady" Traverses 
G. A. Assembly Line Toward First Night Appearance 



FRED BRUBAKER 
Mr. Brubaker as he will appear in the 
roll of Henry Abbott, the arch-vil- 
lain, in "Kind Lady," a drama in 
three acts, now under production by 
the Theatre Guild. The play will 
be produced in Seibert Auditorium 
on Thursday and Friday, January 9 
and 10, at 8:15 p m. 



The night Susquehanna's cagers met 
Gallaudet and the trustees dined and 
planned new buildings was distinguish- 
ed by preparations for "Kind Lady." 
"Kind Lady" is the Theatre Guild's 
January production of Edward Chodor- 
ov's stage adaptation of Hugh Wal- 
pole's story about a kind lady and the 
evil young man who took advantage 
of her. 

As always, practice took place in 
room 300 of Gustavus Adolphus, under 
dazzling, unshaded lights. Mr. Kelly, 
Theatre Guild advisor, and Mary 
Emma Yoder, directress for "Kind 
| Lady," surveyed the scene doubtfully. 
Triple-threat McWilliams, the heroine, 
had not yet put in an ippearnnce. Nor 
had Sinister Brubaker, the villain. Nor 
had anybody else. A perfect beginning. 
Then, in a rush, came Sherry Williams 
first, then everybody else. Sherry sta- 
tioned herself in the rear of the room, 
and all through practice darkly plotted 
out costumes for the heels and hero- 
ines who make up "Kind Lady." 

Triple-threat McWilliams makes her 
entrance — through the window. It 



seems some wise guy had locked the 
doors downstairs, so Louise had to 
climb the fire escape. 

Practice begins. Blanche Forney, 
who is Mrs. Edwards in the play, when 
she isn't onstage, is over in the stock- 
room feverishly learning the number 
and key and opus of Beethoven's thir- 
ty-two piano sonatas. Sinister Bru- 
baker, the villain, when not heeling 
about on the platform, glooms on a 
window seat in the rear, keeping in 
character, and planning new ways and 
means to be detestable. 

George MacQuesten, known to the 
cast as Peter Santard, a Cary Grantish 
young man, carefully stokes his pipe or 
converses with Doris Haggerty. Dor- 
othy Paulik, George-Peter's fiancee in 
the story, makes herself generally pret- 
ty and useful, or makes George-Peter 
go out in the hall and practice their 
lines. 

Lawrence Cady, Blanche Forney's 
husband— in the play— pages through 
"The Exhibitor," looking for clues to 
use in his subtle "suggestions." Doris 
Trainer, Trlplethreat's friend Lucy, sits 



calmly absorbed in writing her hourly 
letters, when she isn't counting Christ- 
mas presents for Rose. 

The maid, Rose, Ellen Russel, very 
hurt onstage, offstage doubles up with 
laughter at whatever, at the moment, 
"slays" her. M'sieu' Gustave Rosen- 
berg Heckert, consistent with his ar- 
tistic character in "Kind Lady," draws 
stylized eggs in stylized baskets on the 
blackboard, assisted by Gus Kaufman, 
who, though a banker, believes in put- 
ting all his eggs . . . 

Doris Haggerty, I ittfhtty dippy wife 
to Sinister Brubaker, suffers herself 
to be carried on by him, and carried 
off by Dr. Pierce Allen Coryell. Be- 
fore Doris, Ellen Russel was the 
carryee. With both girls, the occupa- 
tional disease of Dropping Doris or 
Dropping Ellen has become extremely 
unfunny. In the last act the Doctor 
Coryell and Mr, Lawrence Cady Ed- 
wards carry "Kind Lady" McWilliams 
upstairs. Triplethreat says if they drop 
her . . . well, she isn't Triplethreat for 
nothing. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



building was explained and a sketch 
of the future and more elaborate 
changes of the campus was shown to 
the group. These plans include a suit- 
able and beautifying alteration for the 
entire campus with a new chapel, new 
dormitory for girls, new conservatory, 
and an academic row centering around 
the present Steele Science Hall which 
will be the housing for the classrooms 
of the future. 

President G. Morris Smith states the 
following: "There is no college campus 
which I know which lends itself to 
such a beautiful and effective develop- 
ment as our here at Susquehanna with 
a relatively small amount of money. 
Institutions talk in the millions, but 
with $500,000 for buildings and $500,- 
000 for additional endowment, Susque- 
hanna University could round out on 
an excellent plan firmly placed on a 
splendid cultural foundation of nearly 
eighty-five years duration." 

The program for the dinner was as 
follows : 

Prayer by Dr. T. W. Kretschmann 
After-dinner songs by Crusader Quar- 
tet 
Opening remarks by Dr. William M. 

Rearick 
35th Anniversary presentation by Presi- 
dent G. Morris Smith 
Object ives: $100,000 for classroom 
building and $100,000 for endowment 
Supporting remarks: Dean Russell 
Gait, Dr. Paul Ovrebo, Dr. William 
Russ, Jr., and Mr. Ernest Yorty 
Mr. Frank Eyer for the Trustees 
Mr. Calvin V. Erdly for the Alumni 
Mrs. E. Edwin Sheldon and Mrs. T. 
W. Kretschmann for the Women's 
Auxiliary 

Mr. Paul Shatto for the students 
Mrs. Roscoe C. North. 
By resolution the conduct of the 
campaign was left in charge of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees and President G. Morris 
Smith, with encouragement to push 
the campaign at once. Closing prayer 
was offered bv Dr. George E. Fisher. 



PAGE TWO THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGBOVE, PA. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940 

THE SUSQUEHANNA "SUSQUEHANNA" Sponsors MAY WE . . 

P^heTWly Througho^h^^ire7e"^a^x^ept Thanksgiving. Christ- CUMpUS SqUiffel N Umiflg COflteSt . . SUGGEST 

mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated • 

intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. Tuesday — No Time for Comedy 

riT I J^Z. — Z t, „ki„ f„ »,„„<„„ xj—f,,™. -^ rMr,M,i Q H,^ Man„™r Canny "Ma Nature" has devised a "What is this life, if full of care, jimmy Stewart takes a new role, that 

m ^^SZ'^^^iS^^.XZ'^^a^i^! iK • new decoy for the ultra-intellectuals of We have no time to stand and stare. of a wh y isk ey-tippling, frustrated play- 

. Susquehanna. "Have you seen that wright, and he doesn't do it badly, not 

Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., yttle, grey, sprightly squirrel stopping "No time to see, when woods we pass at all D adly. When our little friend's 

College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y., all tne traffic t and from classes?" Where squirrels hide their nuts in first play a CO medy, proves a big suc- 

Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francis co. One afternoon this furry creature grass." cess he marries Rosalind Russell but 

M7rr^lnTe7colieiiat7Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States, was busily collecting leaves and build- trrQP < nilolv pn tne inevitable other woman steps in 

Member of National College Press Association. ing his nest in the limb of the big Since we have been graciously en- and convinces him that he should 

tree between G. A. and Selinsgrove. dowed with a woodland friend, let us write tragedies. Miss Russell is all set 

THE STAFF Several students sat for almost an think of an appropriate name to give t0 divorce her budding Shakespeare 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER hour, just watching the capers of our it. THE SUSQUEHANNA is going to and marry the o. W.'s husband when 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE woodland friend. When Mr. Brun- sponsor a contest for the best name Jimmy ' s grea t tragedy flops and he is 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner gar t pu t some nuts near the leaves; it and letter telling why that particular only t00 glad to come back home. The 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert was most interesting to see the cau- name was chosen. Further details will dialog is f ast and sophisticated, the 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk Uous ap p roach the squirrel took on its be given in the next issue of the paper, suppor ting cast is good and we think 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum next ffflf leaveg ^^ he found but until then put your thinking caps it , s the best play for the week. 

Staff Photographer . • • • . George Macyuesten diligently examined the on and if you haven't seen our squirrel, . . _ 

^STer^S^^ M! nut before he'd 22 I to a cache in we say with Davies: Wednesday-Thursday Escape 

Blair Heaton, '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; the tree. Timely enough and well done 

Ella Fetheroff '43' Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- This episode reminds one of William A pooi life this if, lull oi care . throughout, but a bit on the heavy 

liamson, '43; Marjorie Wolfe, '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, H. Davies' poem, "Leisure," from which We have no time to stand and stare. side Ro bert Taylor is the young 

'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine the following verse are taken: S American who is trying to help his 

Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, j_ - mother escape from a Nazi concen- 

'43; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer, '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane ((T/ ^ r A TT'/^VT* fnr A IT C " tration camp into which she was 

Shotts, '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44. If JR A KSl )\ M cAJ\ J thrown when she went back to Ger- 

Circulation Manager Ma^ine^eefner J Wi. i^i^J^l OL ^.TV XW ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^^ ^ 

Advertising Managers j Chester Shusta ' cam P doctor remembers her from the 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, '43; Rex Sunday, '43; Dorothy Webber, Once upon a Time there was Joe Joe wasn't in the Groove; he was days when *» ~J» Jf3*£ 

•43- Charles Ague, '44; Ralph Brown, '44; Jean Buffington, '44; Susanne Aesop. He was a Nice Enough Chap in a Rut. and works with Taylor to effect her 

Go'yne '44- Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; although he had a tendency to be He sank lower and lower. release; Norma Shearer is the beauti- 

Lois Krammer, '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. Satiric. But maybe that was his dis- To his knees, his waist, his ears! ful countess who falls in love with the 

faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. peps i a "Help!" he yelled. "Fire! Murder!" hero. 

"■ — " ^, ..»,v ^rnirTt™™ in nun Joe went about his Favorite Campus Where was everyone? When were - - - 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER io, i»w moralizing about This and That. those Stanley Stand-bys, the Junior Friday— Down Argentine Way 

"tittr HITAnT¥F«ST flRFFTINOS' Sometimes he would be Allegorical; G-Men? Where was Superman? Or Here is a good musical done in tech- 

UUK HMKllfiSl uiU^iir*MO sometimes Rhetorical. Smilin' Jack? Or Flash Gordon? nicolor. The plot is trite but who 

The Staffs and advisors Of THE SUSQUEHANNA Wish to Qr worse _ P hii sophical. He had a "I'm forsook!" wept Joe, as he got cares, there are enough good songs 

Send the season's heartiest greetings to all Of our readers and Passion for Capital Letters and Trite a mouthful of sod. and specialty numbers to keep things 

to wish for each one of you a pleasant holiday season. -press,™, Ana Puns were Ms ,.v- Jn** - close* over Aesop .£, *. ™- eaithy ^ 

S , And if anyone even THINKS: Buried Alive! American horse trader who comes to 

A CHALLENGE TO OUR EXISTENCE 'What, No Putter?!" Shame on him Stuck in his own Mud!! New York and falls in love with Betty 

Th : e m „ rninff nr wirkPv in his rhanel address told of the three times.) Moral: You've made your Bed, now Gra ble. the girl whom he should hate 

This morning Di. Wickey in his chapel aaaress toia 01 tne Treeking the campus trickling trite Eat It because of an old family grievance _ 

Charges being made against the Christian colleges, ana tne truisms became, after a while, a Forever yours, the happy climax occurs at the big 

dangers Of annihilation which they are likely to face in the Weary, Dreary Job. —JOE AESOP. h orse race (original aren't they). 

near future It is a coincidence worthy of our consideration - = And may we congratulate 20th cen- 

that fresh evidence of these dangers to the denominational « r A T^rpT TC TTDRTTS" TtuZ^T^JZ^t 
schools should come just at a time when Susquehanna is press- V^2 1.1V AX w cJ A ax,-' xjx. a \^j was crumby in tha t Horatio Aigier ser- 
ine forward with a new building program. Whether the forces — — — — — — ies he did last season, swanee River, 

ing ioiWdiu wiuid new uunuu | , p 6 Qll0 „„ o v, Qn „ Q Play Notes can sport and life. A medallion of the Alexander Bell, and Hollywood Caval- 

urging the abandonment of institutions such as Susquehanna ..p ownright superb> , says the -Times" great coach is above the inscription cade . 

Will succeed or fail depends largely upon the extent to Which of KIND lady starring Grace George "For Outstanding Service in the Ad- ... 

SUCh colleges are able to demonstrate their vitality and efficien- lately presented at The Playhouse on vancement of the Best Interests of Saturday-Rangers of Fortune 

SUtn cuuegeb die auic tu ucmu j ^^ ^ Broadway. Football." This year's recipient has Even if you don't go in for horse 

cy. Challenges SUCh as these Should be faced by all Who COn- ^ Susque hanna Players enjoyed not been determined yet. operas as a general rule you might like 

Sider Christian institutions worthwhile. hearing a radio adaptation of KIND - - - this one. Fred MacMurray steps down 

S LADY featuring Grace George and Music to play the part of head man in a trio 

,n T IT<2 o™ ITP A MFlYIORIAf Herbert Marshall on the Campbell Man y of our conservatory students of vagabonds who escape a Mexican 

Lfcl US m ur A nMWW^ Playhouse program last Thursday agree that no greater tribute could be firing squad and saves a Southewestern 

After the undefeated football season Of 1932 the Student nignt and felt that it aided in their paid Jan sibelius on h is 75th birthday Pioneer town from the murderous 

body efferverSCing with pride and gratitude for the team, de- practices for KIND LADY than the conducting of "Finlandia" by schemes of an old-school Spaniard. 

term'ined to set up some sort of permanent remembrance to its a - ^ in pl _ A rtur T = ini -j*"*- ^ISTT^^^' 

accomplishments. After some constructive dlSCUSSlon and ^ d hTm Stud ents turned to the Greek program on the eve of his natal day. • - ■ 

planning their aims took Shape; and today the lOCk garden, classlcs f or material and presented the Although rumored that he was killed Monday-Charlie Chan at the 

Scene Of the annual May Day Festivities, Stands to the memory CLOUDS of Aristophanes. Next spring during the Russo-Finnish war, Sibelius Wax Museum 

sx,eiie ui uic annual way xsay ' J they hope t0 enact the OEDIPUS REX still lives at his home in Jarvenpae, Typical Monday night fare Mr. 

Of that team and those grateful Students. of Sopnoc ies Finland, where he is said to be at work Chan is called upon to clean up a 

This year the students find themselves in a similar po- - - - on his "Eighth Symphony " messy little murder at the waxworks 

j. 111a ycai mc ^""c"io 11U .,,_., ,, ■ Football Troohv The Saturday night NBC concerts and gets all tangled up with a radio 

Sition. After some gloomy years Of grid history (gloomy in SO £JJ £* -^ Amerlcan pootball are very popular in college circles. Ar- program, a face lifting medico and an- 

far as Victories g'O) the Crusaders have conquered seemingly Coa ches* Association established the turo Toscanini will conduct the NBC other murder. Or as the Chinese would 

insurmountable Odds to finish another season without defeat. Stagg Award ... a plaque aimed at Symphony Orchestra for the remaind- say: Oh, Fooey! 

. , i.i 4—i. 4k.i m nernetiiatimr the examnle and influ- er of the concert season, Saturday ... 

As in 1932 suggestions are coming from the students that "we ^peu,a ^Jhejm^a, a^_ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^.^ ^ Tuesday _ Moon 0ver Burma 

should do something by which to remember this season and _ Lamour. tovjours Lamour. some 

this team." With this idea we are in full sympathy. ^"TvrTi/SAl CDHR TC" " ^mm^'wSS'J^i'Z 

Although at first thought it WOUld seem as if SUCh a project JVjnLlN JL/V/1V1 OL V^/Xv 1 »3 the scene where we find Miss Lamour 

would cost a large sum, it could be realized by a comparatively charming that cobra ought to put any- 
small contribution from each student, if everyone WOUld COn- Well. well, here it is almost Christ- at right end^ Steve Zeravica was se- ^'J^J g£ e SCa ' 

mas and I iust know that all of you lected for a backfield spot . . . Susque- B 

tribute. ^ u S sa X sp( J rt fans need only the sat- hanna contributed a lineman. Blair Why does the Stanley have to ached- 

We understand that a plan to raise money for a memorial isf action of a Susquehanna basketball Heaton. to the all-opponent eleven £e two good pit .tures ^^ r 

to the 1940 undefeated team wii, be announced soon; we urge ^IZ'JZ StT. eT S '. SXZZT*.™™?^ £%.'£ SS£Z££?£l 

every student to arrange to give his bit to this fund. plete At leasti that is what I have subject of football, I wish to remind are going to have a real battle on their 

S placed at the top of my list of desires, you that the two Joes. Campana and hands next pj. iday n i gh t. They no 

• IMC .v, n niiwinvn t\V THF rilRISTIAX OIIXBOE It certainly would be something to Greco, were placed on the All-Eastern doubt wiU ha ve to show improvement 

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Ob IHh tlKlMlA,> UHAMM .. crow .. about . what do vou say. team? Pennsylvania team selected recently over tne per f rmance against Gallau- 

By Frank H. Leavell Gee whiz u sure is a great big by the United Press. Larry Isaacs and det . . Th e Crusaders appear to have 

TO release a preferred output, personified in its graduates, shame that such a glorious grid season Steve Zeravica also received recog- two very strong and experienced quin- 

rrf cunprinr intpllertual excellence and Christian character that vanished in such haste. Oh, well, we ni« on on a United Press team, although tets tnis season Coach stagg's chief 
of supenoi intellectual excellence ana tni bui 1 uiaiaut t ^ ^ iook ^^ ^ ^ cQm _ not on a flrst eleven Sam netcher trome ig going ^ be m findlng the 

Will dependably serve Society and advance tne Kingdom OI Lroa. , ng yeaj . you knQW when the fOQt _ was selected on a sec ond team by the clicking combination for each game. It 
To enroll students Characterized by ambition, potentiality, ba n ' team received their awards in Associated Press ... All in all, I think is quite probable that the five that 
and determination and through the impact Of a Characterful, chapel recently, they appeared rather you'll have to admit that the '40 Cm- clicks against one opponent will not 
ana aeieimniduuii, anu tiuuu^ii one *i H ^ ^ ^^ However, as always, sader eleven received its share of laur- click against another . . . George Mil- 

Christian faculty develop them to their maximum pnysicaliy, loQks w(?re deceivlng They were just els . . . Say, while I think of it— why ler, Sunbury High's gift to Crusader 
intellectually, and socially. as proud to be up there as we were don't you <the student body) show a athletics, is exceptionally fast on the 

. , , < to have them up there. It's ust that little more "pep" at the court games? basketball court . . . Dave Gross looks 

To combine modern teaching techniques and newly leveai- ,. they , re nQt tne type of admit it Any -phis 1940-41 cage squad deserves the like a pretty fair to middlin' set shot 
ed truth With the Older fundamentals of the learning process at hletic group is that way— victorious outburst of your enthusiasm if any for the Jay Vees. Perhaps we should 
so as to imulement the former and conserve the latter in the or otherwise ... Did you ever take cage squad ever did. The cheerlead- nickname him "Dead-eye Dave.'' How 
SO as to implement UC iuuhcj . a " ™*wmU* nf wrh notice of how "nervous and jumpy" ers and the band could aid tremen- about it? . . . Should you really want 

discovery and development Ol the Ultimate poSSlDlllties OI eatn CQach getg &i mr varlous ath i etlc con . dously. Why wait any longer to de- to get an eyeful some evening, step 
individual Student. tests? No— then please take especial cide to root and root hard? ... Did over to a Crusader cage practice and 

.,.,,, . . (V ,„i 1 no ticc the next time He plays the you know that Selinsgrove High School watch Ralph Brown and Don Ford 

TO provide, through specialized leadership, that peisonal ■*£ »• ^^ as t P he y team . and preeburg High School, the first tangle opposite each other They both 
counseling, oversight, and direction that Will develop in the Stu- Aftei . conferring with the varsity Blue two foes the Jay Vees met this season, know their share of the tricks of the 
dent those needed virtues Which will qualify him religiously and and Gold, the Juniatian sports staff went down under 34-19 and 71-39 scores game. "Brownie" moves around that 

„j „..;„;„„i v>,,,. has nicked the Indians' all-opponent respectively. Well, it's so ... If the court like "lightning" and' may even 
spiritually in keeping With the unique genius and original pui- JJM* * ed am he ex I t " e a m a ely proud PP to be 1940 -41 Jay Vee team is any indication land on the varsity squad before the 

pose Of a dstinctly Christian college. ab le to inform you that our own Sus- of the future of Susquehanna basket- season is out . . . What do you say we 

Tn miarantpp a nroduct that will combine the classical quehanna University, "winners of the ball, then everything is going to be pack Alumni Gymnasium to the rafters 

To guaiantee a piOOUCt tnai Win WWIlumc uw Liaoaicai mythlcRl small col]ege championship just like a "bowl full of cherries." A for the Moravian game? The date is 

With the practical, that Will interpret intelligently the present Qf the state » i ed t he list with three bright cage future awaits— not only December 13 (and Friday too!). Keep 

in the light Of the past and that, With a consuming passion for members on the team. Phil Templln. this year, but for some years to come, it in mind . . . Now we must concen- 

;,.„ ?„;ii far. rVm fnturn with r-nmnvmriinp- ahilitv which is lankv all-around athlete, was picked Do you suppose the Moravian cag- trate on trouncing Moravian for the 

service, will face the lutuic with commanaing aointy wmena « g^ bcgt ccnter Juniata faced &n m wU1 be anytning llke that unde . tlme belngi and the n let's take up the 

intellectually undergirded, as well as religiously and spiritually year Susque hanna's "Little All-Ameri- feated grid team they brought here in slogan, "On to State" . . . Good luck, 
motivated. can " wingman, Joe Greco, wsa placed the fall? If so, the S. U. basketeers cagers! 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-*- 



STAGGMEN DEFEAT GALLAUDET 65-38 TO S. U. Crusaders Win 

WIN SECOND IN 19 GAME SCHEDULE Initial Court Tilt 



Templin and Ford Lead Locals' Scoring Spree; 
Sudevico and Duick Pace Blue and White Tally; 

Season's Schedule Announced 

<§, 

Taking a 10-point lead at the half Gf »»» Msikac A \\ '•wAli 
as a result of the shooting of Phil ^ La bO ITiaACo AWdl llO 
Templin, the Susquehanna University rwr 'wr 1 o i m 

basketball team won its second straight £Q U flUCI GfitGCl I 63X11 

game of the season by defeating Gal- 
laudet, 65-38, at the Alumni Gymnas- 
ium here last Friday night. The score 
at the half was 26-16. 

Phil Templin, rangy center, paced 
Susquehanna with nine field goals and 
one foul for nineteen points, while 
Captain Don Ford, aggressive forward, 
had thirteen for his total. Ludevico 
and Duick each had seven points for 
the visitors. 

The Crusaders, gaining momentum 
with each game, had to stage a surg- 
ing second half rally to gain the hard 
fought decision. Every member of the 
starting five scored at least four points 
to aid in ruining Gallaudet's inaugural. 
Even in defeat, however, the Blue and 
White put up a courageous battle 
against an overwhelming height disad- 
vantage. 

Gallaudet went ahead briefly before 
the close of the opening quarter. How- 
ever, baskets by Templin and Isaacs, 
and a foul by Heaton regained the lead 
for Susquehanna, and the Staggmen 
went on to win handily. 

The lineups and summary: 
Gallaudet Fd.G. FIG. Pts. 

Johnson, f 1 Ox 1 2 

Butler, f 1 Ox 1 2 

Duick, f 3 lx 3 7 

Ludevico, c 3 lx 1 7 

Weingold, c 2 2x 2 6 

Hanson, g 2 Ox 2 4 

Herzog. g 1 lx 2 3 

Padden, g 2x 4 2 

Baldridge, g 1 3x 4 5 



Totals 14 10x20 38 

Susquehanna Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 

Ford, f 6 lx 3 13 

Isaacs, f 4 3x6 11 

Smith, f 3 3x 3 9 

Templin, c 9 lx 1 19 

Stonesifer, c 2x4 2 

Heaton, g 2 lx 5 5 

Miller, g 2 Ox 4 

Walsh, g 1 Ox 2 2 

McCord, g Ox 



Coach A. A. Stagg proudly handed to 
the 18 members of the undefeated foot- 
ball team, their major "S" letter dur- 
ing the chapel period on November 26. 
! Three seniors and co-captains of the 
I team during the season— Sam Fletch- 
er, John Matthews and Joe Greco, were 
awarded special trophies for three 
•years of successive service. 

Seven of the eighteen awards went 
to sophomores with the varsity squad 
this season. Only four seniors — Fletch- 
er, tackle; Greco, end; Matthews, 
guard; and Campana, guard, will be 
| lost to the Crusaders ranks next sea- 
| son. Joe Wos was the only freshman 
to pick up these honors 

Varsity awards were granted to Sam- 
I uel Fletcher, tackle ; Joe Greco, end ; 
jJohn Matthews, guard; Joe Campana, 
I guard; Phil Templin. center; Blair 
! Heaton, end; Richard Matthews. 
| tackle; Monroe Meyers, halfback; John 
| Zuback, quarterback; Steve Zeravica, 
fullback; Larry Isaacs, halfback; Jack 
Helm, halfback; Joe Wos, fullback; 
Kenneth Lyons, halfback; Stanford 
Blough, guard and center; Bob Mc- 
Fall. quarterback; Bob Martin, tackle; 
and Ed Richards, end. Dan MacCart- 
ney was awarded a managerial insignia . 
Minor awards were conferred upon 
Joe Peyton, Donald Ford. Frank Cor- 
coran, Ray Conrad, George Bass, and 
Jim Hall. Other members of the squad 
awarded numerals are: Alan Berlin, 
Marvin Maneval, Herman Stuempfle. 
Howard Dye, Rex Sunday, Gilbert 
Weinberger, Stanley Nale and Paul 
Stetler. 



Last Wednesday, December 4th, the 

Susquehanna basketball quintet went 

on a scoring spree to beat the Potts- 

ville Branch of Penn State by a score 

jof 71-23 in the initial court contest. 

The score at the half-time was 20-10. 

iThe season's first game showed clever 

[handling of the ball, particularly by 

Eugene Smith and Captain Don Ford. 

Skillful shooting was displayed by high 

scorer Phil Templin, who racked up 

twenty-one points, and Don Ford, who 

obtained fifteen points. 

After a rather slow first half, the 
Orange and Maroon settled down to 
, some smooth ball playing, both shoot- 
ing and passing. Coach Stagg used two 
teams to obtain the victory. If we can 
just keep up the good work maybe the 
basketball team will have a season 
similar to the football season. 

Lineups: 
Pottsville Branch of 
Penn State Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 

Wiley 2x 8 

Young 2 

Shuman 

Hein 3 

Mandiebaum 

Bull 1 

Bilinski 

Eisanhuth 1 

Thomas 

Hebber 



lx 1 
Ox 1 
lx 1 
2x 6 
Ox 2 
Ox 2 
Ox 
lx 1 
lx 1 



Susquehanna 

Ford 

Smith 3 

Templin 10 

Heaton 1 

Walsh 1 

Miller 2 

Isaacs 3 

Stonesifer 3 

McCord 



2 

5 


7 

a 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
23 
Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 
. . 6 3x 5 15 
3x 5 9 
lx 3 21 
Ox 2 
2x 2 4 
Ox 1 4 
4x 5 10 
Ox 6 
Ox 1 

71 



Senior Girls Capture 
Soccer Round-Robin 



Totals 27 

Referee: Walters. 



11x24 65 



The games remaining on the 1940- 
41 schedule include: 
December 13 — Moravian at Selinsgrove 
December 18— Penn State at State Col- 
lege 
January 11— Alumni at Selinsgrove 
January 14 — Scranton-Keystone at Sel- 
insgrove 
January 18 — Elizabethtown at Selins- 
grove 
February 1— Moravian at Bethlehem 
February 3 — Bucknell at Lewisburg 
February 5 — Juniata at Selinsgrove 
February 8 — Ursinus at Selinsgrove 
February 14— Bucknell Jr. College at 

Selinsgrove 
February 15— Elizabethtown at Eliza- 
bethtown 
February 18 — Dickinson at Selinsgrove 
February 20 — Wagner at Selinsgrove 
February 22— Drexel at Philadelphia 
February 24 — University of Mexico at 

Selinsgrove 
February 26— Wyomissing Poly. Tech. 

at Selinsgrove 
March 1 — Juniata at Huntingdon 



1940-41 BASKETBALL SQUAD 

Pos. Name Jersey No. Hgt. 

White Red 

F Ford (O 13 8 5" 7" 

F Isaacs 11 12 5' 6" 

C-F Templin 21 5 6' 3" 

G Heaton 24 4 6' 

C Stonesifer 17 18 6' 1" 

P Klepko 9 9 5'10" 

F-C Smith 6 11 6' 

G Walsh 9 31 5'11 M 

G McCord 7 3 5'10" 

G Miller 22 15 5'10" 

Note: White jersies will be wor 
home games. 



Wt. 

145 
142 
190 
180 
170 
150 
160 
160 
150 
180 
n for 



Haverford, Drexel, and 
Dickinson Signed for '41 

Next year's grid schedule is not def- 
initely announced but the games al- 
ready carded include: September 27, 
University of Buffalo, away; October 
4. American University, away; October 
U, Haverford, home; October 18, Juni- 
ata, home; October 25, C. C. N. Y., 
home; November 8, Drexel, away; and 
November 15, Dickinson, away. 



Jay Vees Win Third Tilt 
Over Lewistown Cagers 

Coach Bob Pritchard's speedy and 
steady Susquehanna University Jay 
Vees captured their third straight vic- 
tory of the current cage season last 
Friday night from a Lewistown team, 
the Owls. The tilt was played here in 
Alumni Gymnasium as a preliminary 
contest to the Gallaudet-Susquehanna 
game, and the homesters wound up 
with a 39-17 margin. 

Bill Janson, freshman center, again 
led the scoring with a thirteen point 
total. The entire squad of eighteen 
men saw service throughout the con- 
test, and keenly observing onlookers 
concluded that the 1940-41 edition is 
one to be reckoned with. 

The lineups and summary: 
Lewistown Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 

Hughes f 2x 2 2 

Warntz, f 2 2x 3 6 

Eisenhart, c Ox 

Kirk, g 1 lx 2 3 

Merely, g 1 lx 1 3 

Wolfkill, g 3x 3 3 

Rishel, g Ox 

Totals 4 9x11 17 

Susquehanna Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 

Gross, f 4 Ox 1 8 

Grimm, f 2 lx 2 5 

Parcell, f lx 1 1 

Janson, c 5 3x 3 13 

Wolfe, c 1 Ox 2 

Bollinger, c 1 Ox 2 

I Stetler, g lx 2 1 

Flickinger, g 1 2x 2 4 

Lohman, g lx 1 1 

Stuempfle, g 1 Ox 2 

Totals 15 9x12 39 

Referee: Lewis. 
Umpire: Wos. 

S 

S. U. Asked to Aid in 
Purchasing Ambulance 

An appeal to the student body for a 
fund to purchase and maintain an am- 
bulance in Europe is being made 
through the S. C. A. The collection 
will be taken at the annual Christmas 
dinner which is being held in Horton 
dining room on December 16. 

Since even one ambulance is an ex- 
pensive object, it will be necessary to 
co-operate with other schools on the 
project. Similar appeals to colleges 
throughout the country are being re- 
ceived with enthusiasm. 
S 



The Soccer Round Robin between the 
freshman, sophomore, junior, and sen- 
ior girls was completed before the 
Thanksgiving vacation. The senior 
class continued to be tops among the 
girls' sports by remaining undefeated 
in soccer as well as in hockey. The 
results of the games are as follows: 
Seniors vs. juniors, 2-1. 
Sophomores vs. freshmen. 1-0. 
Seniors vs. sophomores, 4-1. 
Juniors vs. freshmen, 4-1. 
Seniors vs. freshmen, 4-0. 
Juniors vs. sophomores, 4-2. 
The captains for the class teams 
| were Jean Buffington, freshman; Louise 
! Mc Williams. sophomore; Delphine 
| Hoover, juniors; Ellen Bennage. sen- 
I iors. 



—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



Freshmen and Phi Mu 
Win Volley-Ball Games 

With the continuance of the intra- 
mural volley ball, it seems that the 
contest for first place is going to take 
place between Phi Mu Delta and the 
freshman team, coincidental with the 
( one which occurred in touch football 
i In the games played so far, both teams 
have won twice, each defeating Bond 
and Key and Beta Kappa once. 

Great spirit has been shown in the 
games, all having been closely con- 
tested. A schedule for the remaining 
games will soon be completed. 

The players for the teams are as 
follows: Phi Mu Delta: Eugene Smith. 
Johnny Jones. Jim McCord, Don Stiber, 
Fred Warner, Al Knapp, and Bob 
Konkle; Bond and Key: Mel Jones, 
Clyde Sechler, 'Red'' Mitman, Gerry 
Startzel, Ed James, Paul Shatto. Rex 
Sunday, and "Salt" Baxter; Beta Kap- 
pa: Merle Hoover, Harry Wilcox, Don 
Bashore, Jay Auker, Ken Wilt, and 
Ken Klinger; Freshmen: Glenn 
Schueler, Ray Hochstuhl, Marvin Man- 
eval, Fred Krebs, George Bass, Ralph 
Brown, Dave Lohman, Joe Wos, and 
Jim Clark. 

Seniors-Juniors Lead in 
Volley-Ball Tournament 

Another round-robin in girls' sports 
has started and this time it's volley- 
ball. The first games of the round - 
robin were played on Friday afternoon 
and the results were as follows: The 
seniors and juniors defeated the sopho- 
mores and freshmen respectively. 
There are also second teams in this 
sport and the sophomores beat the 
seniors and the juniors defeated the 
freshmen. 



Publicity Director Picks 
S.U. All-Opponent Team 

Swarthmore, American University, 
and Moravian, each claim two spots 
I on undefeated Susquehanna Univer- 
sity's All-Opponent team announced 
by the University's publicity office. 
Players with the Crusaders during the 
second undefeated campaign in 48 
years of intercollegiate history, label 
Ed Grega, Juniata's brilliant triple- 
threat ace, as the greatest offensive 
threat operating against them this fall. 
The season brought to light a sterling 
give-and-take sportsmanship between 
Susquehanna and her opponents. Pow- 
er was hitched to head-work, team-play 
based on vise-tight cooperation and yet 
loose enough to allow every man to 
become a star with his own specialty. 
The Crusaders found some of the 
better players on the eleven that they 
had the least amount of trouble with. 
American University was trounced 33- 
13 but Captain "Jabby" Jablonsky, a 
big tackle, played havoc with the Cru- 
sader line until injuries forced him 
from the game. Swarthmore was se- 
lected as the best drilled eleven and 
Moravian for having the best individ- 
ual players on their squad. 

Susquehanna's All-Opponent lineup 
includes — at ends, 182 pound Dominick 
Grossi, of the University of Buffalo, 
and Walt Blasco, standout sentinel 
with the Moravians; at tackles, 210 
pound John Jablonsky covered plenty 
of territory along with Carl Savino, 
another mastodonic tackle /rom Hart- 
wick; at guards, two tough-fibred 
spear-heads, Johnny Burkhardt, chub- 
by Moravian ace, and Dick Carr, of 
Swarthmore, caused the Crusaders 
plenty of trouble. Art Gmitro, of City 
College of New York, proved to be a 
smart pivotman on both offense and 
defense. This rugged backer-up was 
extremely effective against the Sus- 
quehannans. 

Backfield All-Opponents selected by 
the Susquehannans are all of the fast, 
shifty specie which disturbed them 
most during the season. The quartet 
of triple-threat aces includes 160- 
pound Ed Grega. great Juniata back, 
given the nod at quarterback; at half- 
backs are. Homer Springle. hard run- 
ning, kicking and passing freshman 
with American University, and Ralph 
Marasco, firey speedster with Alle- 
gheny College. Hulking Tony DeGutis, 
of Swarthmore, was a fullback worthy 
of any line smashing tradition as far 
as the Crusaders are concerned. He 
was a powerhouse on the offense and 
a stonewall on the defense. 
Susquehanna's All-Opponent Team 
L. E. — Dominick Grossi. University of 

Buffalo 
L. T. — Carl Savino, Hartwick College 
L. G. — John Burkhardt. Moravian Col- 
lege 
C— Art Gmitro. City College of New 

York 
R. G. — Dick Carr. Swarthmore College 
R. T. — John Jablonsky. American Uni- 
versity 
R. E. — Walt Blasco, Moravian College 
Q. B— Ed Grega, Juniata College 
L. T.— Homer Springle. American Uni- 
versity 
R. H. — Ralph Marasco, Allegheny Col- 
lege 
F. B.— Tony DeGutis, Swarthmore. 



MAIL YOUR 

ORDER NOW. 

for 

CHRISTMAS 

FRATERNITY 

JEWELRY 

to 

BALFOUR BRANCH 
OFFICE 

109 S. Allen St. 
STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

Balfour Catalogs Available 
at Campus Fraternities and 
in Sorority Rooms 



"PORTRAITS" 

of 
Colorful Distinction 

REBER STUDIO 

349 Market St.. Sunbury, Pa. 
Phone — 477 

SITTINGS BY APPOINTMENT 
ONLY 



REICHLEY S FLOWER SHOP 

CORSAGES — CUT FLOWERS — 
POTTED PLANTS 

11 North Market St. Phone 74-X 
SELINSGROVE 



SHOES ? 

GEDDY'S 



of SUNBURY 



Crystal Pure Ice 

CHAS. W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fryling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Try a CORONA Portable Typewriter 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Lytle's Pharmacy 
7he ^&*all Store 

Registered Drug Store 
SELINSGROVE. PA. 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
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Sunbury, Pa. 



TYDOL 



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Walnut Street, Selinsgrove. Pa. 



B. K. W. COACH LINE 
Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
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an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER! 



Watson town Brick Co 
Paxton Brick Co. 

BUILDING BRICK 



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PAVING BLOCKS 

Office: 
WATSONTOWN, PA. 

Factories: 
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PAGE FOLK 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SFT jvsr.ROVE. PA. 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1940 



Dr. Ahl Entertains Phi 
Kappa at Xmas Meeting 

Phi Kappa held its Christmas meet- 
ing at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Ahl, 
Wednesday evening, December 4. 

The opening devotional period was 
in charge of William Jansan, who led 
the group in the singing of a number 
of Christmas Carols and prayer. The 
Christmas story was read by Robert 
Booth in the original Greek as record- 
ed in the Gospel of Saint Luke. An 
inspirational address was delivered by j 
Dr. Ahl with regard to the current i 
subject of Advent. 

Henry Van Dyke's story, "The Ooth- 
er Wise Men," was told by Martin Hop- 
kins. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
and the remainder of the evening was 
spent playing games, Eugene Smith 
officiating. 

A vote of sincere thanks was ex- 
tended to Dr. and Mrs. Ahl for their 
kindness in inviting the club members 
to their home. 



"Susquehanna" Officers 
To Receive Golden Keys 

A meeting of the executive commit- 
tee of the Susquehanna Publishing As- 
sociation was called by Robert Booth, 
vice-president. 

The purpose of this meeting was to 
discuss plans for the awarding of gold- 
en keys in recognition for active ser- 
vice on The Susquehanna staff. 

It has been felt for some time that 
those who have faithfully contributed 
their services on either the editorial 
or the business staff of The Susque- 
hanna should receive some award for 
their work. 

The basic requirements to receive 
the award, together with the actual 
style of the key will be discussed at a 
later meeting. 



SNOWBALL TO FEATURE 
SOPH DANCE SATURDAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 
chestra from Danville. 

The dance is to be called "The Snow- 
ball." 

Committees for the dance are as fol- 
lows: 

Decoration: Holmes and MacCart- 
ney, co-chairmen; Startzell, Walsh, 
Ulsh, Bashore. Wolfe, E. Williamson, 
Arentz, and Klinger. 

Furniture: Groethe and Curry, co- 
chairmen; Cox. Turnbach, and Wilcox. 

Orchestra: Welsh, chairman; Gait, 
Webber, and Parcells. 

Tickets: Eastep, chairman; Jerore, 
Milford, Spooner, Delleker, and Wen- 
ner. 

Program: Corcoran, chairman; Gun- 
drum, and Betty Rene Smith. 

S 

DR. WICKET ASSERTS 



jence of the L. S. A. A. will be held 
February 28 to March 2 at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
a program of Christian education, then 
education will be swept out of their 
hands. First there comes the subor- 
dination, then subjugation, and finally 
annihilation." 

S 

TEN STUDENTS ATTEND 



S 



Colorful Pageant Given 
At Auxiliary Meeting 

Saturday afternoon, December 7, the 
Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University met in Seibert Hall. The 
girls of Sigma Alpha Iota entertained 
the ladies with a Christmas pageant. 
Betty Malone was coach; Louise Mc- 
Williams, reader; Faith Harbeson, so- 
loist; and Lois Yost, organist. The 
rest of the girls were shepherds, wise 
men, madonna, angel, and carolers. 
Mrs. Sheldon was chairman of the 
program committee; Mrs. Stagg. chair- 
man of the food committee. 



Hoover Addresses S.C.A. 
Joint Meeting Thursday 

The Student Christian Association 
held a joint meeting on Thursday, De- 
cember 5, at 6:45 p. m. in Seibert so- 
cial rooms. 

The devotional meeting was led by 
Elaine Miller, president of the S. C. 
A. Merle Hoover was the speaker, giv- 
ing a very interesting survey of Geor- 
gia Harkness' book, "Religious Living." 



Pasterchik and Boyer 
Speuk in Pi Gamma Mu 

President Joseph Pasterchik presid- 
ed over the Pi Gamma Mu meeting 
held at the home of Professor Brun- 
gart on Monday evening. The program 
consisted of reports by two of the stu- 
dents. Marion Boyer talked on the 
article found in the Social Education 
magazine. "The Responsibilities of Cit- 
izenship." "Propaganda" was the sub- 
ject of Joe Pasterchik's talk, the con- 
tent* of which was compiled from sev- 
eral of the current magazines. 
S 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ing convened at which time Kenneth 
Wilt was elected president of the Penn 
State Area and Lester Yarnell, vice 
president. 

The speaker for the conference even- 
ing church service was Dr. C. P. Harry 
of the University of Pennsylvania, who 
spoke on the topic, "The Bible." 

The Middle Atlantic Region Confer- 

strand 

i i r \ i t r 

sunbury 



WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY AND 
FRIDAY 

Nelson Eddy 
Jeanette MacDonald 

"BITTER SWEET" 

SATURDAY 

Richard Dix 
Florence Rice 

"Cherokee Strip" 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

Marlene Dietrick 
John Wayne 

"Seven Sinners" 

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, 
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Alice Faye 
Betty Grable 

"Tin Pan Alley" 



O. D. S. Spreads Christmas 
Joy in Children's Party 



Thursday evening from 5:30 to 7:30 
the social rooms of Seibert Hall and 
the O D. S. sorority room will be the 
scene for the annual Christmas party 
for the poor children of Selinsgrove. 
Each year Omega Delta Sigma gives 
these children the opportunity to en- 
joy a real treat and talk to Santa 
Chins, who is impersonated by one of 
the sorority girls. 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



THE STANLEY 
THEATRE 

SELINSGROVE 

• • ■ 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Norma Shearer 

"ESCAPE" 

FRIDAY 

Don Ameche 

"Down Argentine 
Way" 

SATURDAY 

Fred MacMurray 

Rangers of Fortune 

MONDAY 

Sidney Toler 

"Chan At Wax 
Museum" 

TUESDAY 

Dorothy Lamour 

"Moon Over 
Burma" 



BE "TOPS" IN HEALTH — DRINK MILK 

mm mm WILSON'S DAIRY STORE SSSS, 

Fountain Service 
DINNERS — LUNCHES — SANDWICHES 



iietwern 



WHEELS OF DRAMA REVOLVE 
AS "KIND LADY" TRAVERSES 
G. A. ASSEMBLY LINE 

• Continued from Page 1) 

Janice Crawford, as Aggie, the mor- 
onic daughter to Forney and Cady, has 
two lines to say in the play, but plenty 
of action. She says she's getting the 
jitters, so many people holler at her. 
Norma Frank, who is the maid, sits 
and listens, and studies, and doesn't 
study, and talks. 

Mr. Kelly and Mary Emma Y., to 
get back to them, sit smack in the 
front two center seats and carry on 
an active directorial conversation. 
Every once in a while Mary Emma 
presses the buzzer, and an abnormally 
loud doorbell scares heck out of every- 
body. 

The actors act, and their shadows 

move about on the walls, conversing in 

I perfect English, and then fold over 

j with the anguish of laughter and ter- 

| rible witticisms. 

Mr. Kelly retires to the rear of the 



room for perspective. Some stage ar- 
rangement displeases him. Leaping 
chairs and people, he dashes up to the 
platform, pushes Doris "Lucy" Trainer 

and Triplethreat McWilliams around, 
while Doris and Triplethreat continue 
giving their lines. After several ses- 
sions with Mr. Kelly, they know what 
to expect. 

Nine-thirty brings intermission, to 
listen to Grace George, who created 
the role, play "Kind Lady" on the 
radio with Herbert Marshall, the 
wooden-legged Hollywood actor. The 
cast gathers about Sinister Brubaker's 
radio, on the third floor of Gustavus 



Adolphus, and listen to the conden- 
sation of the play they have been prac- 
ticing, coming out of the little portable 
via New York City. 



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REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



SWANK'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Next To Relchley's 
SHOE SHINE 



Compliments of 

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N. Market St., Sellnsgrore, Pa. 



Compliment! of 

Keller's Quality 
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MEATS and GROCERIES 



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S. U. BOOK STORE 

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SUSQUEHANNA 
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Studies Sold At 

THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



WHITMER-STEELE CO. 

Lumber Manufacturers 

Northumberland, Pa. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 

An accredited co-educational college offering the following standard 

courses:— 

LIBERAL ARTS and SCIENCE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 

FOUR YEARS SOLOIST COURSE IN MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 

'.RE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, PRE-LEGAL, PRE-THEOLOOICAL 

A.B.. B.8, and Mus. B. degrees 

O. Morris Smith, A.M.. DD., Pre*. 
Russell Oalt, Ph.D., Dean 



Susquehanna Univ. Library 




THE SUSQUEHANNA 



Student Publication of Susquehanna University 



Welcome 
Coach 
Stagg 



Volume XXXXVII. 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 7. 1941 



Pi Gamma Mu Hears 
Dr. John Woodruff 



Fraternities Pledge j The Grand Old Man 

Large Group of Men 



Number 16 



Professor Emeritus of Philosophy | Pledges Appoint Officers; Leach 
Explains Inner Workings of State I Heads Beta Kappa Group; Steumpflc 
Legislature to Honor Society Band and Key; Jansen Phi Mu Delta 



Last evening at 6:45 Pi Gamma Mu, 
social studies honor society, met in 
their January meeting at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. Kretschmann, Faculty 
Row. 

Dr. John I. Woodruff, professor 
emeritus of Philosophy at Susque- 
hanna, spoke to the group concerning 
the Pennsylvania State Legislature. 
His subect was "How a Bill Becmoes a 



The three fraternities on the campus 
brought to a close a successful rush- 
ing season before the Christmas vaca- 
tion. The season was climaxed by the 
pledging of a large number of men to 
the fraternities. Now begins the dut- 
ies of the pledges when they will pay 
for the favors showered upon them 
when they were being rushed. The 
following men pledged to the fraterni- 



procedure as presented by Dr. Wood- 
ruff: 

Content of bill prepared. 

Submitted to attorney for draft- 



Law." Following are the steps in this I ties and neld their organization meet 

' ings at which time they elected officers 
for the period of their pledgeship. 
Beta Kappa 
John Leach, Selinsgrove. president 
Franklin Fertig, Northumberland, 
vice president 

Stanley Nail, Thompsontown. chap- 
lain 
Joseph Wos, Johnstown, secretary 
James Howell, Troxelville, treasurer 
James Mallory, Canton, guard 
Fred Krebs, Beaver Springs, social 
chairman. 
Bond and Key 



1 
2 
ing. 

3. Three copies are presented to the 
Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives. 

4. Considered by the committee. 

5. Reported unto the floor of the 
House by a committee member who 
may report favorably, or adversely, or 
may advocate amending the bill. 

6 
clerk to the House. <This is a carry 
over from the days before printed I de ^ 
copies could be distributed to all mem- 
bers.) 

7. Undergoes second reading. Here 
amendments may be made. Reprinted 
as amended. 

8. Discussed on the floor as to 
whether it should be passed. 

9. Voted upon to determine passage 
or defeat in the House. 

10. Sent to the Senate, where it fol- 
lows the same line of procedure. 

11. Sent to Uie office of the Attorney 
General for hr. estigation as to its con- 
siiuuionality^,.,. 

12. Sent to the Governor. 
Commenting on the bicameral vs. 

the unicameral system of legislation, 
Dr. Woodruff said that the unicameral 
system allowed action with greater dis- 
patch but in the long run our slower 
American system of checks and bal- 
ances is a better safeguard to our 
democracy. 

S 



Herman Steumpfle, Hughesville, 
Undergoes first reading by the • present 

James Wert, Millersburg, vice presi- 
>nt 

Ralph Brown, Bloomfield, N. J., sec- 
retary 

James Clark, Bloomfield. N. J., treas- 
urer 
Other pledges are: 
Philip Plummer, Selinsgrove 
Allen Flock, Sunbury 
Paul Stetler, Middleburg 
Lester Yarnell, Altoona 
George Bass, Drexel Hill 
Ray Conrad, Kingston 
David Lohman, Trucksville 
Howard Paine, Taylor 
Phi Mu Delta 
.William. Jansen, iork. .president 




Program Include Well Known Works 
Of Several Composers; Personnel 
Made up of 32 Students and Alumni 



COACH A. A. STAGG." SR." 



Coach A. A. Stagg, Sr., 
Visiting Son Here 



Stopping Over on Way to New York 
To Receive Trophy from Touchdown 
Club; Accompanied by Mrs. Stagg 



Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Stagg, Sr., of 
Stockton, California, are enjoying a 
five day visit with their son at Uni- 
versity Heights. 

The rudy faced "grand old man of 
football," now in his 51st year of 
coaching, came east to receive the 
Touchdown Trophy tendered to him 
by the Touchdown Club of New York. 
^This award will be a jjermanent.recog 
John Zubac, Trafford, vice president nition for his contributions to the 
Robert Hunter, Pittston, secretary game of football. Also while in New 
Charles Ague. Hughesville, treasurer York, he expects to meet many of his 
David Rishell, Selinsgrove, chaplain former teammates and many others 
Others: that he made famous during his coach- 

Robert Stowers, Montgomery, W. Va. ing career. 



Norris Smith, West Nanticoke 
Richard Moglia, Bloomfield. N. J. 
: Ray Hockstuhl. Bloomfield, N. J. 
Glenn Scheuler, Bloomfield, N. J. 



Placement Bureau Gets 



Clifford Graham, Lewistown 
Wilmer Grimm, Middleburg 
Pamphlets On VOCationS Gilbert Weinberger, Old Forge 

The Placement Bureau has received : s 

just recently from Washington a set k]oi*|Y |?f O'lWJ T'lf IflM 
of extremely interesting pamphlets that - Liai V Hv^Wll U UUI I 
give concise, but specific information ot l j i 4 1 

about different professions and occu- OCn6(lUle AnnOUnC6G 
pations which might be of particular 
interest to all students. 

These pamphlets include the follow- 



ing fields: Law, Medicine, Dentistry, 
Journalism, Librarianship, Architec- 
ture. Civil Engineering, Electrical En- 
gineering. Mechanical Engineering, 
Pharmacy, Nursing, Forestry, Music, 
Veterinary Medicine, Chemistry. Chem- 
ical Engineering, Art, and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

The opportunities in each field are 
discussed, and maximum, minimum, 
and average earnings are given, as well 
as specific information about educa- 
tional requirements, where they may 
be had, and the approximate cost of 
such education. For example, the aver- 
iimual earnings in private prac- 
tice I -d to be $6,980. A grariu- 
1 a School of Veterinary Medicine, 
for which only 60 credit hours of col- 



Blanks May Be Gotten at Registrar's 
Office; Faculty Advisors Announce 
Office Hours for Student Sessions 



More than just a few times, while 
he was being interviewed, he jumped 
from his comfortable chair to demon- 
strate a play of the game. With a 
; sparkle in his eye and his short stubby 
fingers running through his snow white 
hair, he watched his son diagram plays 
on a portable blackboard. When the 
Heaton-Zeravica pass play was sketch- 
ed, he said: "Fine art, fine art," and 
: he added. "I think it was wonderful 
that the team could go through such 
; a season. It would take me many years 
i to produce such a team." 

Munching cough drops to ward off 

! a slight cold, he leaned back in his 

chair and nonchalantly ad libed about 

his career. With amazing precision he 

Mrs. Ulrich. the registrar, has just 1 told of games he played in college. The 

released the information concerning J names of his teammates seemed un- 

registration. Preliminary registration | doubtedly clear in his mind, when he 

will be held as follows: spoke of the season of 1884. With the 

Seniors and Juniors, week of Jan- - am '' Precision he described definite 

uary 6 - 11 plays that were used, the yardage 

Sophomores and Freshmen, week of j guincd ' and of course the exact scole - 
January 13 - 18. " l think football is infinitely tougher 

Registration blanks mav be gotten at am: ■ better game," he said when he 
the registrar's office with full instruc- ; was a - sked abou; the change* that had 
tions for filling them out. All blanks occurred since he has been coaching. 
are to be in the office bv January 18. '"Blocking has made the game more 

Each student must secure the ap- dangerous," he added. During his ca- 
proval of his faculty advisor before re- WW the only Injur (rived was a 

turning the blank to the Office, Office -1 Jiuiiitci ankle, 
hours of the faculty are: The coach was originally to speak 



Each year the students and friends 
of Susquehanna are privileged to en- 
joy the concert of the Susquehanna 
i Symphonic Society. This organization 
has already started rehearsals for the 
j annual concert which will include such 
1 well known works as the following: 
! Russian and Ludmilla Overture — 

Michael Ivanovich Glinka 

Flirtation Waltz p. A. Steck 

Serenade enfantine F. Bannaud 

Italian Symphony ... T. Mendelssohn 

Marioettes Merle S. Isaac 

Cydalise et Le Chevre-Pied — Gabriel 

Pierne; transcription by Mouton 

The tentative personnel of the or- 
ganization is: 

Russell Hatz — concertmaster 

David Coren 

Marvin Groce 

Mary Lee Krumbholz 

Dr. Fred Tischke 

Elizabeth Landis 

Eugene De Ban- 
James Myers 

Margaret Ulrich 

Ernest Bodner 

Elsie Hochella 

Ruth Schwenk 

Phyllis Wolfe 

Jessie Walton 

Martha Bartholomew 

Jean Warner 

Joseph Pasterchik 

James Wert 

Emanell Whitenight 

Ralph Wolfgang 

Janet Sechrist 

Jay Auker 

Robert Stowers 

Kenneth Bonsall 

Neil Fisher 

Allen Flock 

Eugene Mitchell 

Roy Gotshall 

Peter Lamon 

Edison James 

Ruth Naylor 

Warren Fritz. 



4- 



• ork is required for entrance, can j Dr Ahl By appointrncm lU Trinity Lutheran Church. Sunday 

Immediately find work In either state or. Dunkelberger Registrar* office ■ to the football squad 



overnment service, at a beginning 

salary of $2000. 

S 



S. C. A. Caroling Party 

Climaxes Celebration 



11-12 daily, beginning January 13 

Miss Boe — Wednesday.-; 2-3 p. m.; 
Steele 200 



in Horton Dining Room on Monday 
(Continued on Page t) 

s 



SUSQUEHANNA THESPIANS TO PRESENT 
"KIND LADY," FIRST PLAY OF SEASON 

Louise McWilliams and Fred Brubaker Co-Star 
In Drama of Sinister Evil, January 10, at 8:30; 

W. B. Kelley and Mary Emma Yoder Direct 

<$> 

Q« „,nl„ .. / \ ' " Kinci Lady." which closed on Broad- 

ly mpnony Organizes; wa >- ■ sh °'t time ag o. comes to seine* 

Hall auditorium Friday evening. The 

Plans; AnmmiTnnpprr Thcatre Guild wil1 prescnt this ad *p- 

1 Ulil^ lHllUrtl VUIItei l tation by Edward Chodorov of a story 

from Hugh Walpole's famous Herries 

I saga the night of January 10, at 8:30. 

Louise McWilliams and Fred Bru- 
baker are the stars of "Kind Lady." 
| Louise in the title role u Mary Harries, 
a middle-aged woman, befriends a 
young painter. Henry Abbot, played by- 
Fred Brubaker. 

Mary Herries' friend. Lucy Weston, 
Doris Trainer, is surprised when Mary 
brings this strange young man in out 
Of the London streets on Christmas 
Eve. The maid. Rose, acted by Ellen 
Russell, suspects Henry Abbott is more 
than he seems. 

Phyllis, Mary's niece, played by Dor- 
othy Paulik, and her fiancee, Peter 
Santard, George MacQuesten, suspect 
nothing, being more engrossed in their 
coming marriage and. Phyllis, at least, 
in selling some of Peter's American 
bonds to the rich Miss Herries. 

The kind lady decides her kindness 
has been, if not mistaken, at least im- 
prudent. She determines never to see 
Henry Abbott again, but he forces his 
way into her house. He has some very 
bad paintings which Miss Herries buys 
to get rid of him. 

To guard against that, Henry has 
brought his slightly weak-minded 
"wife" Ada along. Ada. Doris Haggerty, 
conveniently faints outside in the 
snow, and is hastily brought into the 
house. Doctor Pierce Allen Coryell says 
,tii£ '.'sick." woman cannot be moved. 

"Kind Lady" is the story of Mary 
Herries' struggle to free herself from 
the domination of Henry Abbott and 
his friends. These last are the Ed- 
wards family, as sinister a group of 
friends as can be found in the annals 
of the theatre. Blanche Forney is Mrs 
Edwards, a shrewish woman out for 
living off no-matter-how-gotten gains. 
Her husband, who is played by Law- 
rence Cady, has the same end in view. 
Their daughter Aggie, Janice Crawford, 
is also no little dove. 

In her attempts to get rid of Henry- 
Abbott and the Edwards. Mary Herries. 
whom her friends believe away on a 
round-the-world journey, is almost 
helpless. She tries to make contact 
with the outside world through Mon- 
sieur Gustave Rosenberg, Forrest 
Heckert, in the role of a Parisian art 
dealer; and through Mr. Foster, a cau- 
tious banker, played by August Kauf- 
mann. 

Even the maid. Norma Frank, doesn't 
know Mary Herries is Imprisoned in 
her own home. 

'Kind Lady" was first produced on 
Broadway five years ago, with Grace 
George in the Starring role. Her hus- 
band. George Brady, successfully re- 
vived it last year, With his wife again 
in the lead Alter a long run the New 
York company closed during the 



Production Stalls 

"Kind Lady" i rsl Susque- 

hanna Theatre Guild production under 
the direction of Mr, UTalte] Kelly, a 
to tin tafl this 

tan! dirt ctor and stage manager, both 

(Con tinned 41 
S 



a 



Prize Offered for Best 
Name for Campus Pet 



Cl . Fis w'X Da ; ly [l \ 9 ; M r dav ' X U T ,)r - Ahl Attends Meeting 

dav, Wednesday at 4, ofhee in Steele „_ ~_ .. . . _ ^ 

Dr Heath-8-9. 11-12, Tuesday, Thurs- ()t Philological GrOlip 

day. Saturday; afternoon by appoint- 

S. C. A. held its annual Christmas ment Dr. William A.. Ahl. professor of 

Caroling Party on slippery, slushy Do- Mr. Gilbert By appointment (ireek. and Ancient History attended the 

cernber 17. Carolers were bundled in Dr. Kretschmann— meeting of the American Philoli 

old clothes for protection from the ; Mr. Reitz— Tuesday. Thursday, o-ii; Society at Johns Hopkins University In 

cold, rainy weather. Visiting all the: Wednesday. 8-9, 11-12, office G. A. Baltimore over the vacation. The Chief 

faculty homes, they sang old Christ- Dr. Russ Daily 3-4, G. A. 301 

mas carols and also that popular tune, Miss llaad Wednesdays, '2-:i The Cot- 

"Jlngle-Bells." Carolers were invited tage 

into the home of Dr. and Mrs. Heath. Dr. Scudder— Monday. Wednesday, 11- 
Dg in the front door, through thej 12; Tuesday, 9-10; Friday. 9-12. of- 

living room- and the kitchen, the muddy lice Steele 

found then- way out the back door Dr. Adam Smith Tuesday, Thur- 
so- Mrs. Heath handed everyone an 10-12; Monday. W> 

apple. To be sure many made a second 10-11, Steele Math Office 

round. Returning to Seibert Social Dr. Wilson Dally 9-12, English Office 

Rooms, refreshments were served and: g. A. 

dancing helped bring back warmth to Dr. ovrebo By appointment 

fold feet. i Continued on Page 4) 



discussion of interest concerned: the 
Situation of the study of classical lan- 
gUSge and cultural study in colleges 
and high schools. FOOT reasons were 
riven why those subject , should be In- 
cluded in curricula today; the study of 
I ireek and Latin is d to lead 

to a i ' lish; 

qui] ■ i knowledi 
the terroln 
the physical cm from 

Ore* I 
have cultural value 



Reminiscent of the affairs of the old 
year is the contest being sponsored by 
THE SUSQUEHANNA for the name of 
the .squirrel which capers on our cam- 
pus. Perchance this is start lingly new 
to some of the students who these days 
scarcely can tear their eyes away from 
the books now that exams are looming 
In the near future To such we refer 

to the articles In the last issue of the 

ir; to the res* we repeat the invi- 
1 their abilities in this In- 
competltlon. 

The rules of tin . i fol- 

i. Any student of Busquehanns Is 
■le, provided he I n the re- 

cipient of the winning name. 

3, The letter explaining the re 
for the name submitted shall be ad- 

d to the Editor of THE SUS- 
QUEHANNA. 

3. The letter must be placed in THE 
SUSQUEHANNA mail-box winch is lo- 
cated to the left of the trophj oi ■ ta 

1 entrance Of G. A. no later than 

tour o'clock on Sunday afternoon, Jan- 
uarj 12. 

4. The letters will be Judged on the 
of originality of the Itlon 

and the appro] if the name. 

Mr Kelly will |udge the letters 
and submit the result to the Editor 
hi time for publication In the Tuesday, 
' ! U HE SUSQ1 

NA. 

prise will bi Jnut 

Irrel, 
. • of ! 
the winner, 



Three Campus Sororities 
Begin Rushing 1 Season 

Sorority rushing ha.- begun ! 

i officially opened on January 2 

Rushing COD tstl of sorority girls pay- 
ing attention to freshman girls by in- 
vitlng them to parties or movie treat 
The expenses are taken care of by the 
girls themselves or by the sorority. All 
three sororities will be rushing ahk- * 
this year. 

Rushing win continue until February 

4. when the week of Intensive ru 

Quiet period begins Feb! 
11, Si 9 a. m. and < Qdl February I 

. riod no 
girl mav talk to any freshman 
Pledgl i2. a. !■ 

The dance for the pled tea a ill 
February 15. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1941 



THE SUSQUEHANNA 

Published Weekly Throughout the College Year, except Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, Semester, and Easter Vacations, the same being the regularly stated 
Intervals, as required by the Post Office Department. 

Subscription $2.00 a Year. Payable to Maxine Heefner, '42. Circulation Manager. 
Entered at the Post Office at Selinsgrove, Pa., as Second Class Matter. 

Represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., 
College Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York. N. Y., 
Chicago, Boston, Los Anngeles, San Francisco. 

Member Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic States. 
Member of National College Press Association. 

THE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HARRY B. THATCHER 

BUSINESS MANAGER ELIZABETH REESE 

Associate Editor Dorothy Haffner 

Managing Editor Forrest Heckert 

News Editor Ruth Schwenk 

Sports Editor Charles Gundrum 

Staff Photographer George MacQuesten 

Reporters: G. Robert, Booth, '41; Donald Ford, '41; Miriam Garner, '41; Merle 
Hoover, '41; Jane Hutchinson, '41; Ruth Specht, '41; Kenneth Wilt, '41; 
Blair Heaton. '42; Donald Bashore, '43; Pierce Coryell, '43; Mary Cox, '43; 
Ella Petheroff, '43; Dan MacCartney, '43; Harry Wilcox, '43; Dorothy Wil- 
liamson, '43; Marjorie Wolfe, '43; Katherine Dietterle, '41; Maye Snyder, 
'41; Lawrence Cady, '42; James Clark, '44; Janice Crawford, '44; Katherine 
Fisher, '42; Cliff Graham, '44; Audrey Haggerty, '42; Herbert Holderman, 
'43; Geraldine Jones, '44; Robert Kiefer, '44; Maryruthe Sell, '44; Jane 
Shotts. '44; Dorothy Wanser, '44. 
Circulation Manager Maxine Heefner 

Adverts Ma„a B e,s | JgjKi 

Business Assistants: Frank Corcoran, '43; Rex Sunday, '43; Dorothy Webber, 
'43; Charles Ague, '44; Ralph Brown, '44; Jean Bufflngton, '44; Susanne 
Goyne, '44; Helen Hocker, '44; Martha Jane Jacobs, '44; Gerry Jones, '44; 
Lois Krammer, '44; Helen Romberger, '44; Nadia Zaremba, '44. 

•faculty Advisors: Editorial, Dr. A. H. Wilson; Business, Prof. D. I. Reitz. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1941 

THE DAYS THAT LIE AHEAD 

According to the grim schedule of horrors on page 4 of 
this issue just six studying days remain before the semester 
finals begin. For a few this means that soon students will be 
given an opportunity to prove themselves; for many it means 
that the six intervening days must be spent in a race against 
time; this is, if they wish to continue their sojourn with this 
little body of students. 

We shall pass on without preaching on the ideal rules of 
study: keep up to date at all times, review often whether tests 
have been assigned or not, do more than the mere requirements. 
The time for such rules has passed. An emergency is at hand. 

Our advice is that each student who feels a need for some 
drastic reorganization should read page 43 of the Handbook, 
bearing in mind that it is not a cure but directions for effect- 
ing a reform; and then tie himself down to a regular schedule 
of coordinated work. For a few even this will not suffice now, 
but for the large majority such a plan can do wonders if fol- 
lowed conscientiously. 



fr ODDS 'N ENDS" 

or "Look Listeners!!!" by Clyde Sechler 



Look Listeners!!! 

Stuff — Back again, knowing less, and 
getting doggoned sick of hearing "I 
Hear a Rhapsody," and "High on a 
Windy Hill." Perhaps some of us don't 
know why, and perhaps I can tell you 
why: There is a company or something, 
called the ASCAP. That means 
"American Society of Composers, Au- 
thors, and Publishers." This outfit was 
founded by Victor Herbert in 1914; the 
original purpose was: collective action 
to protect its members from piracy of 
their copyrights. That is a fine, noble 
thought, but — the boys went over their 
heads a little, and — to be very technical 
— they were using practices designed 
solely for the purpose of eliminating 
competition in the furnishing of mu- 
sic, and securing a monopoly control 
of the aforesaid supply of music. The 
story goes that they violated the Anti- 
Trust Law and got away with it. until 
they crossed up the big radio stations. 
Now I'll try to explain how the inter- 
necine warfare started: To begin with, 
money is the root of all evil. Wasn't 
it ever thus? Since I am an American, 
I'll have to spout statistics — In the 
year of 1940. ASCAP collected 4,000,000 
bucks from radio for the privilege of 
using their songs — good and otherwise. 
This year they decided to up the ante 
and make it $6,500,000, which naturally 
would have placed the burden on the 
big broadcasting chains. In other 
words, ASCAP wanted to collect its 
money thru a blanket license on total 
incomes. — BUT the broadcasters want- 
ed to pay according to the amount of 
ASCAP music used. Thus, the Ameri- 
can public finds itself embroiled in one 
of the most bitter fights since Punch 
and Judy. Oh, yes, ASCAP collected 
its revenue from movie theatres, night 
clubs, restaurants and radio stations. 
NOW. the people's choice comes thru. 
The broadcasters formed a company 
called BMI, which means— Broadcast 
Music, Inc. This outfit has decided it 
can get along perfectly without ASC 
AP, with new composers, new songs, 
and very old songs. In other words, 
the BMI emphasizes new talent and 
the ASCAP favors established talent. 
So the two outfits fight on, and every- 
thing is rosy for a good fight except 
that they seem to have forgotten Poor 
Mr. Paying Public, which, dear read- 
er, if any, means you and your room- 
mate. But there is one guy who has 
not forgotten us, and his name is Uncle 
Sam, and so he finds an outfit of 
trouble shooters into the fray. This 



gang goes under the name of U. S. 
Dept. of Justice. They have decided 
that everyone is at fault, and it is a 
mutual boycott which "will hamper 
and obstruct the rendition of copy- 
righted music over the radio and de- 
prive the public of the privilege of 
hearing that music except on terms 
dictated by the victor in the contest." 
In such a struggle, the public is the 
neutral caught between two aggressive 
belligerents. The Dept. dickered first 
for a decree which would have estab- 
lished an open and competitive mar- 
ket, but no one would play ball, and so 
now they're going to proceed with a 
criminal prosecution to protect the in- 
terests of the public in orderly compe- 
tition in the distribution of music. 

Perhaps you would like to know 
some of the players: 
ASCAP 

1. George M. Cohan— It's a Grand 
Old Flag 

2. Irving Berlin — God Bless America, 
Alexander's Ragtime Band 

3. Jerome Kern — Old Man River 

4. Sigmund Romberg — Lover, Come 
Back to Me 

5. Carrie Jacobs Bond — I Love You 
Truly i Played 23,000 times in 1940) 

6. Vincent Youmans — Tea for Two 
(Played 19,000 times in 1940) 

7. Mighty Lak a Rose (Played 9,000 
times in 1940). 

BMI 

1. Ernest Gold — Practice Makes Per- 
fect 

2. Joan Whitney — "So You're the 
One" and "High on a Windy Hill" 

3. Stephen Foster — "Beautiful 
Dreamer" and "I Dream of Jeanie 
With the Light Brown Hair." This 
number is triple threat — It has been 
played as a classic, as a swingeroo, and 
as a waltz. 

Something quite new happened last 
evening, or should have happened. 
"There I Go" took all ten places on 
the Hit Parade. All the rest of the 
numbers belonged to ASCAP. Sammy 
Kaye and Eddie Duchin have decided 
to go on road tour, rather than do 
BMI numbers on the radio. Mr. Kaye 
says BMI numbers do not do his band 
full justice. Ha. I'm lafflng!!! Rich- 
ard Crooks and James Melton were 
scheduled to do "AY, Ay, Ay" within 
half an hour of each other on Monday 
night. Frenesi has been played 10,000 
times. Save your pennies, kids, and 
next weeek we'll all go to Sunbury and 
buy records. 

S 



MAY WE . . 
. . SUGGEST 



TUESDAY 

They Knew What They Wanted 

This adaptation of Sidney Howard's 
stage success has received a lot of at- 
tention and justly so. The Hays office 
did a rather complete job on the story, 
but there was enough left to show 
Carol Lombard at her best; Charles 
Laughton is supreme in an entirely 
new type of role. 

WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY 
Little Nelly Kelly 

In the first part of this pleasant 
little musical Judy Garland plays a 
charming Irish peasant girl who can- 
not reconcile her father to the young 
man who has ideas about going to 
America to become a cop. 

It is very sad and all that when this 
lovely lady dies but our Judy carries 
on as her equally charming daughter, 
still trying to break the feud between 
her father and grandfather. The 
songs help carry the picture over its 
weaker spots. 

FRIDAY 
Christmas in July 

There isn't much we can say about 
a picture like this one. The plot is a 
simple thing concerning the plight of 
Dick Powell who has been fooled into 
buying a lot of luxuries on credit while 
he is under the impression that he has 
won a slogan contest. Mr. Powell does 
as well as can be expected and Ernest 
Truex turns in a good supporting part. 
You would much rather see Kind Lady 
anyway. 

SATURDAY 

Queen of the Yukon 

They tell us that Miss Rich doesn't 
weigh any more at 40 than she did at 
16 (thanks to Welch's) but I found 
her part in this one plenty heavy, 

MONDAY 
Go West 

The Marx brothers live up to all ex- 
pectations in the latest of their all too 
infrequent free-for-alls. 



LETS TALK IT OVER 

Despite the fact that The Susquehanna does not ordinarily 
discuss matters relating to the administrative policy of the uni- 
versity, we feel obligated to reflect the attitude of the great ma- 
jority of students, men and women, toward the present rule pro- 
hibiting the ladies to bring their escorts into the parlors after 
dances. Criticism of this new rule has been so strong and the 
arguments voiced have sounded so valid that we should like to 
evoke discussion of this problem between students and admin- 
istration in an effort to overcome the malcontent. 

In the light of the information in our hands as to the pos- 
sible reasons for such a rule, we cannot see why it is necessary. 
Having studied its effects during the three dances since its in- 
ception we regard it as having derogatory effects stronger than 
any reform it may have been intended to effect. 

The students argue that they are taught by their parents 
to bring their escorts into their homes after an evening out. 
Many parents not only recommend but insist upon this. With 
such a policy we agree. We believe that a more wholesome in- 
fluence will result from allowing the men and women to con- 
verse to r in the parlors of Seibert than from denying them 
this privilege and leading them reluctantly to wander about 
the campus or go driving during the few minutes after the 
dance; the present rule obviously does just this. 

The weather for the three dances that have taken place 
under this new rule have illustrated another reason why Sei- 
bert Parlors should be open following dances. On the first two 
occasions rain was falling at the end of the dance making Sei 
bert porch an unfitting place to climax an evening of dancing: 
last Saturday evening the weather was altogether too cold to 
remain outside The oncoming winter will very likely bring 
lower temperatures for future dances. 

of course, it may be argued that the dancers need not re- 
main outside if the weather is bad but may say goodnight im- 
mediately. This, no doubt, is the assumption followed by the 
' ers o! the rule in question. Experience has indicated, how- 
ever, that this does not hold true. At any rate we do not feel 
that the evening should be cut short merely because the par- 
lors are not open. 

We favor 1.1 1- tiding of this rule because it has no ap- 

ent motive and I [U results are unpleasant and lead 

in the wrong direction. 

We encourage discussion of the topic in order that a better 
understanding Oi the problems involved may serve to quiet the 
present disconl 



"CAMPUS TIDBITS" 



Come to think of it. I don't like to 
play second fiddle; but many are the 
times that my peer, dilapidated type- 
writer has to pound out and rehash 
an article for THE SUSQUEHANNA. 
Now it has just automatically declared 
Its New Year resolution, and that is 
"This typewriter, being in sound mind 
and endowed with the standard alpha- 
bet, determines to maintain a weekly 
negotiation with my fingertips and will 
submit, hopefully, the result of any 
such contact.'' 

Shades of the rainbow! Did you 
see the exhibition displayed in the 
Horton Dining Hall this noon? Take 
it easy, Cady was only winning a dare 
and the only other time you'll have 
to put Up With that yellow and purple 
combination will be when you attend 
the showing of "Kind Lady" on Friday 
in i,t in Seibert Chapel. 

You can't escape it, even at eight 
o'clock In the morning! There was 
Mr. Kelly's drama class, sitting pa- 
tiently and awaiting the arrival of the 
ier, when suddenly the door op- 
ened, and in came a prancing horse. 
firmly grasped in afore-mentioned 
Kelly's right hand. Only another of 
those elusive props for "the play which 
has finally been tracked to its hiding 
place; not another "Bring 'em back 
alive" series. 

Mrs. Humphrey was busy this noon 
since she had to arrange B startlingiy 



long line of trays for the sick-a-beds. 
Tish. tish, you gals should be more 
cautious when venturing forth on a 
cold and blowy night even if the Rush 
Dance promised an entertaining even- 
ing, it didn't guarantee immunity from 
lurking colds 

In reviewing for the coming exams, 
it has been suggested that each of you 
review the article, "Cramitis Epidem- 
ic," which appeared in the October 
29th issue of THE SUSQUEHANNA. 

I noticed an old grad, Preston Smith, 
going up the stairs in G. A. this morn- 
ing. My it's nice that they do return 
to the campus at odd moments during 
the year. 

Just before we departed to our var- 
ious homes for the Christmas vacation, 
the girls of the Cottage were met with 
a disastrous mishap. Marylee had 
caught four baby mice and they were 
taken under the mothering wings of 
the whole house. Sad to state — one 
morning a cold wintry blast stiffened 
the four little figures in death. Tear- 
ful farewells were made and the epi- 
sode of the playful little scamps was 
over. 

Alas, there must have been a short- 
circuit somewhere, because this article 
has unexpectedly run head-on into a 
stone wall. You must admit, however, 
that it makes one feel like a man to 
assert one's right once in awhile! 



MERE SCMIBBLINGS 



Her" we are Struggling away a 
alter the grand vacation, It seems 
everytime one turns around there is a 
term paper assigned. Didn't your prof 
assign you one — well, consider yourself 
lucky! On these windy, blustery days, 
you can see the "scholars" strutting 
acre* the campus to the library to do 

t little research. The worst blow of all 
j.s the Semester Exams, can you Imag- 
ine any person wanting to torture 111 in 
ruei manner? What have we 
ever doa e to deserve such a cruel 
treatment dngi that's |us1 the 

i uble. In no time now the chatter in 
the dorm will die down, snacks will 



cease, and some intensive cramming 
will take place. If you never had a 
chance to live the life of a hermit you'll 
get it now. Dust will accumulate under 
your bed, your clothes will be thrown 
in back of your closet, and .some things! 
wont be found for weeks after. Won'! 
it be just our luck to have a dance at 
the end and we poor girls with OUT 
bags under our eyes. It will give the 
a chance to play porter — better 
apply now in order to avoid the rust 
Okay, kids, all fun aside for a few 
weeks, pass your exams, and then 
you'll have clear sailing again until 
Sprii 



AMONG OUR . . 
. . . ALUMNI 



Elizabeth Fry, '38, of Pittsburgh, has 
just been named librarian for the Car- 
negie-Illinois Steel Corporation, subsid- 
iary of the U. S. Steel Company in 
Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the 
School of Library Science at Carnegie 
Institute and served as assistant librar- 
ian at Slippery Rock State Teachers 

last year. 

* * * 

Rev. Harold Ditzler, '28, formerly 
pastor of the Reformed church in Lock 
Haven, has just accepted the pastorate 
of the First Reformed church of Los 
Angeles, California. The church is just 
eff the campus of the University of 
Southern California and his work will 
deal largely with the 7,000 students on 
that campus. Rev. Ditzler was assistant 
pastor of an Edinburgh, Scotland, 

church before coming to Lock Haven. 

» * * 

The first woman to receive the Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degree from the Uni- 
versity of Calif ornia is Dr. Lillian E, 
Fisher, '12, a native Selinsgrover, who 
has recently completed a novel dealing 
with an old Spanish background which 
is to be produced as a motion picture 
in the British Empire, It is understood 
that negotiations are under way for an 
American motion picture production of 
the same novel. 

The United States Government com- 
missioned Dr. Fisher to study Spanish- 
American histoiy in Spain during the 
winter of 1929 and 1930. She was sta- 
tioned most of the time at Seville, 
where the Spanish government gave 
her full access to their government ar- 
chives on that subject. For this work 
she has received marked recognition 
on the Continent and in this country 
and now in light of the recent develop- 
ments in Spain, her work becomes 
doubly important as many of her re- 
m arch sources have been destroyed. 

Dr. Fisher is now professor of his- 
tory and psychology in Oklahoma Col- 
lege for Women in Chickasha, Okla- 
homa. She has written three textbook! 

on Spanish history. 

• * * 

Claude G. Aikens. 11. son of the late 
Ident Charles T. Aikens and mem- 
ber ot the University's board of trus- 
ses, recently dedicated a new and one 
Of the most modem prinlery in (Vn- 

tral Pennsylvania, h> plant is lo 

in State College where he publishes the 
"Centre Daily Times" and the "Stat* 
College Collegian" which recently be- 
came a daily. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1941 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PA. 



PAGE THREE 



THE SUSQUEHANNA SPORTS 



-«-- 



-<S>- 



Moravian Scores Two Penn State Defeats 
Point Win Over S. U. Susquehanna Cagers 



Templin and Ford Score 19 and 17 
Points Respectively. J. V.'s Defeat 
Tressler's 34-12 



Crusaders Go Down Under a 55-18 
Defeat at State College Court. S. U. 
Scoring Honors Go to Templin 



When the smoke of battle had finally 
cleared on the evening of December 13, 
c'Black Friday" for the Crusaders) 
Moravian College had inflicted a 
heart-breaking 51 to 49 defeat on the 
luckless Susquehanna University cag- 
ers. A near capacity crowd witnessed 
the rough and tumble affair which 
was played in Alumni Gymnasium. 
The fans, largely local enthusiasts, 
were held spellbound as the Grey- 
hounds proceeded to wipe out a 49 to 
41 Susquehanna lead in the final two 
minutes of play. 

The Greyhounds started fast and 
managed to roll up an early lead which 
held out until the half ended at 21 to 
19. However, the second half was a dif- 
ferent story as the Staggmen began to 
find the range. Led by Phil Templin 
and Don Ford, who scored 19 and 17 
points respectively, Susquehanna grab- 
bed what looked like sure victory mid- 
way in th fourth period. Nevertheless, 
McConologue, high scorer for the even- 
ing with 22 points, and Kraus, rangy 
center, unleashed a barrage of field 
goals from all angles and Moravian 
walked off the court with a narrow 
two-point bargin. 

This game marked the opening 
Pennsylvania Conference tilt for the 
Orange and Maroon, and also marked 
their first defeat of the current season. 

The preliminary contest saw the Sus- 
quehanna University Jay Vees continue 
their amazing streak with a 34 to 12 
win over Tressler's Orphanage. The 
Pritchard five has now rolled up a 
grand total of five wins in a row, and 
once again they rolled along with com- 
parative ease. 

Tressler's started strong and held a 
4 to 2 edge at the end of the first per- 
iod. Early in the second period baskets 
by Janson, Grimm, and Stetler placed 
the Jay Vees in a lead which they 
never relinquished. No less J-b&o. 20 
points were dropped through the hoop 
by S. U.'s Jay Vees in a big third per- 
iod, while the Orphanage cagers were 
being held scoreless. 



<f. 



RANDOM SPORTS" 



Displaying plenty of Height and a 
well-balanced attack, the Penn State 
basketball team recorded its third win 
in four games at the expense of the 
Susquehanna University cagers by a 55 
to 18 count. For the S. U. five, it mark- 
ed defeat number two in a row. The 
■ame was played at State College Wed- ; 
nesday, December 18. 

The State cagers took immediate ad- 
vantage of Susquehanna's strangeness 
to their court and to their style of play 
to roll up a comfortable 26 to 5 lead in 
the first half. The Stagg five showed 
vast improvement in the second half, 
but still was unable to cope with the | 
well-polished and experienced Nittanyj 
Lions. 

Phil Templin was again high scorer 
for Susquehanna, although he caged 
only six points throughout the evening. 
Susquehanna Pd.G. FIG. Pts 

Ford, f 

Templin, f 

Smith, f 

McCord. f 

Isaacs, f 

Heaton, c 



Here's hoping that the Alumni game 
will enable the S. U. five to break that 
brief losing spell before it drags too 
much on their spirits... . Mora vian 
College certainly is the team to beat 
in the Pennsylvania Conference this 
year. Susquehanna's win over Moravian 
in football and vice versa in basketball 
makes everything "fifty-fifty" between 
the two schools for 1940-41. The Cru- 
saders' return tilt at Bethlehem on 
February 1 should be a "killer".. . .No 
doubt the unique backboards at State 
caused the Orange and Maroon five a 
little shooting confusion at first. The 
backboards were rounded on the upper 
corners... . Stuard Flickinger. a Jay 
Vee regular, saw action in the final 
minutes of the varsity practice tilt 
against Penn State the other night. Al- 
though "Flick" wasn't in long enough 
for one to pass definite judgment on 
his ability, you can be assured that he 



is a "real comer" — The Crusader cage 
team must start making their fouls. Do 
you know that they made only 5 out of 
20 against Moravian, while the Grey- 
hounds were dropping in 7 out of 14. 
It was this phase of the game which 
spelled the difference between the two 

teams on that particular night 

Penn State's cagers seemed to have 
trouble with dribbling against our Cru- 
saders. Perhaps that is their number 
one weakness. S. U. appears to have a 
number of good dribblers, but cage 
games are won on shooting accuracy.. 
. Many were under the impression that 
our unscheduled game with Penn State 
last Friday night was against only 
their reserves. That impression is abso- 
lutely incorrect. To say that is to de- 
grade our team. There were no less 
than five varsity regulars playing for 
State 



1 

3 

1 





1 

Miller, g 2 

Walsh, g 



2x 4 
Ox 2 
Ox 1 
Ox 1 
Ox 
Ox 
Ox 
Ox 



S. U. Quintet Play WithlFamed Crusader Eleven 
State in Practice Game Receive Jacket Awards 



Totals 8 2x 8 18 

Penn State Fd.G. Fl.G. Pts. 

Moffatt, f 4 Ox 1 8 

Barr. f l Ox 2 

Silan. f 3 2x 2 8 

Egli, f 3 2x 3 8 

Baltimore, c 2 Ox 4 

Linde, c 4 Ox 8 

Grimes, g 1 Ox 2 

Gross, g Ox 

Edgar, g 1 lx 1 3 

Ramin. g 2 Ox 1 3 

Crowell, g 4 Ox 8 



Totals 



.25 



5x 8 55 



Outstanding Courtmen 
Return for Alumni Game 



Junior Girls Take First 
Place in Volleyball Race 



Two weeks before the Christmas va- 
cation began the girls' volleyball round 
robin was played off. So many girls 
signed up to take part in volleyball 
games that it was necessary for W. A. 
A. to make new rules in order that all 
could participate. The Juniors' first 
and second teams won all three of 
their games to become the champs. 
The results of the games are: 
First Teams 

Won Lost 

Seniors 1 2 

Juniors 3 o 

Sophomores 3 

Freshmen 2 1 

Second Teams 

Seniors 1 2 

Juniors 3 o 

Sophomores 1 2 

Freshmen 1 2 

Following the semester exams the 

class basketball games will begin. 
-S- 



I'NIQUE ADVERTISING 

The Theatre Guild has hit upon a 
clever bit of advertising for their cur- 
rent production, Kind Lady, to be pre- 
sented in Seibert Auditorium Friday 
evening a! 8:30. The procedure is 
something like this: The Guild pays 
for a package of bright yellow dye and 
gives it to Lawrence Cady to color a 
shirt for his costume in the play. Law- 
rence wears the gaudy costume to ! 
lunch in Horton Dining Room. As ( 
would be expected he attracts atten- 
tion. The students sing to him and 
*& him to stand. Then with a nourish 
II"' illustrious Mr. Edwuni arises and 
everybody laughs. Meanwhile whisper- 
" . strategically located throughout ' ] 
"»' room, begin sales talks. 



This Saturday evening Susquehanna 
will have one of its toughest basketball 
games. The alumni team that they will 
play is made up of some of Susque- 
hanna's best known basketball stars. 
The grads who will take part in Satur- 
day's game include: 

Robert Herr, '39, was captain of his 
team his senior year and had the high- 
est percentage of fouls in collegiate 
circles. 

Don Wert, '39, was captain of his 
team in 1938 and is now a coach at 
Aaronsburg High School. 

Bob Fisher, '40, was co-captain of the 
team in 1940 and an aggressive forward. 
Bob is now at Gettysburg Seminary. 

Bill Nye, '40, wa.s a very good guard 
although not a high scorer on the 1940 
team. Bill is now at Mount Airy Sem- 
inary in Philadelphia. 

Clair Kaltreider, '40. wa.s co-captain 
of the team his senior year and also a 
guard of note. 

Tom Valunis. '36, was one of Susque- 
hanna's three letter men. He is now a 
coach at Selinsgrove High School. 

Kenneth Badger, '36, also a three let- 
ter man who is occasionally seen on 
the campus refereeing basketball 
games. Badger is at the present em- 
ployed at the Epileptic Colony. 

With this group of Susquehanna': 
leading athletic stars our basketball 
team will have plenty of opposition. 

S 

Boyer and Bonawitz Lead 
First Vespers of New Year 

Vespers last Sunday were led by Irma 
Bonawitz and Marion Boyer. Faith 
Harbeson sang "We Would Be Build- 
ing." 

Marion in her talk suggested that we 
sii.ents should resolve to follow 
Christ. 

The benediction was pronounced by 
Dr, Kretschmann. 



Susquehanna University's basketball ! 
team swung into action again after a 
two weeks layoff for th